The MightySat Medical, an over-the-counter medical fingertip pulse oximeter, has received clearance from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use without a prescription, according to a press release from manufacturer Masimo.

The device is the first and currently the only medical fingertip pulse oximeter available directly to consumers without a prescription, and it includes the same technology used by many hospitals, according to the company.

Pulse oximeter use is important for patients with diagnosed breathing problems or lung diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, lung cancer, flu, pneumonia, or COVID-19 to collect accurate data on arterial blood oxygen saturation that they can share with their healthcare providers, according to the company. However, challenges of pulse oximeter use include measuring accuracy when patients are moving, measuring patients with poor circulation, and measuring patients with darker skin types. The MightySat Medical is designed to provide reliable measures of oxygen saturation and pulse rate across all patient groups, the manufacturers wrote in the press release.

Other over-the-counter pulse oximeters that are not cleared by the FDA may create confusion among patients about the accuracy of their measurements, according to the company.

"Healthcare providers can also now be confident when referring their patients to get MightySat Medical knowing that it has actually been cleared by the FDA as an OTC medical pulse oximeter," said Joe Kiani, Masimo founder and CEO, in the press release.

MightySat Medical is indicated for individuals aged 18 years and older who are well or poorly perfused under no motion conditions and is not intended as a diagnostic or screening tool for lung disease, according to the release. Treatment decisions based on data from the device should be made only in consultation with a healthcare provider, the company said.

The FDA's website offers guidance related to at-home pulse oximeter use, with recommendations and limitations, as well as information on initiatives to ensure accurate and equitable pulse oximetry for all patients.

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Mechanical Ventilators

Mechanical Ventilators

The global ???????????????????????????????????????? ???????????????????????????????????????????? ???????????????????????? is estimated to witness increased sales during forecast period. This increased sales rate is attributed to growing older population and rising cases of respiratory diseases. Mechanical ventilator is an artificial breathing device majorly used for treating patients with severe medical conditions. Growing number of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the worldwide population is driving the growth of the global mechanical ventilators market.

The global mechanical ventilators market was worth US$ 1.9 Bn and is projected to reach a value of US$ 5.5 Bn by the end of 2027, is anticipated to grow at a CAGR of 12.8% during the forecast period.

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Teleflex Incorporated,VYAIRE,Dragerwerk AG & Co. KGaA,GE Healthcare,Medtronic plc,Koninklijke Philips N.V.,Smiths Medical,ResMed Inc.,Bunnell Inc.,,Getinge AB.

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Critical Care Ventilators

Neonatal Ventilators

Transport and Portable Ventilators

Interface

Invasive

Non-invasive

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Home Care

Hospitals and Clinics

Ambulatory Surgical Centers

Others

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In April, 2020, U.S. government under the Defense Production Act- issues US $1.1Bn in ventilator contracts to Koninklijke Philips N.V. and G.E. Healthcare.

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According to the World Health Organization (WHO), chronic respiratory disease comprise all such medical conditions that affect the airways and other lung structures. Some common chronic respiratory diseases are asthma, chronic obstructive lung disease, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchitis and emphysema, lung cancer and neoplasms of respiratory and intrathoracic pulmonary heart disease and diseases of pulmonary circulation.

According to WHO, around 65 million people suffer from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and 3 million die from it each year, making it the third-leading cause of death worldwide.

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Market size and growth projections

Segment-wise analysis

Regional dynamics and trends

Regulatory landscape

Competitive analysis

Technological advancements and innovations

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North America(USA, Canada and Mexico)

Europe(UK, Germany, France and the Rest of Europe)

Asia Pacific(China, Japan, India, and the Rest of the Asia Pacific region)

South America(Brazil, Argentina and the Rest of South America)

Middle East and Africa(GCC and Rest of the Middle East and Africa)

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???????????????????????? ???????????????????????????????????????????? ????????????????????????- www.globenewswire.com/news-release/2023/05/19/2672660/0/en/Cancer-Diagnostics-Market-Set-to-Surpass-USD-335-7-Bn-Revenue-by-2031-with-CAGR-of-7-4-Transparency-Market-Research.html

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Transparency Market Research, a global market research company registered at Wilmington, Delaware, United States, provides custom research and consulting services. Our exclusive blend of quantitative forecasting and trends analysis provides forward-looking insights for thousands of decision makers. Our experienced team of Analysts, Researchers, and Consultants use proprietary data sources and various tools & techniques to gather and analyses information.

Our data repository is continuously updated and revised by a team of research experts, so that it always reflects the latest trends and information. With a broad research and analysis capability, Transparency Market Research employs rigorous primary and secondary research techniques in developing distinctive data sets and research material for business reports.

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Nikhil Sawlani

Transparency Market Research Inc.

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Indians suffer high rates of lung function damage after acute with about half reporting shortness of breath, according to a recent study, a worrying finding that experts attribute to various reasons, including co-morbidities and pollution.

The study by the Christian Medical College, Vellore, is the largest from India to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on lung function. It examined 207 individuals, showcasing substantial impairment in lung function, exercise capacity, and quality of life among recovered individuals.

The study revealed a high prevalence of respiratory symptoms among Indians who recovered, even after a mean of over two months following acute illness, with shortness of breath reported in 49.3% and cough in 27.1% of the cohort.

“It is clear from the study that lung function is affected more in the Indian population compared to data from other countries across every category of disease severity,” said study lead researcher D. J. Christopher, professor of pulmonary medicine at CMC Vellore.

“Although it is impossible to know the exact cause of worse impairment among Indians, co-morbidities may be a factor contributing to lung damage, as our population had much higher co-morbidities than the others ” Dr. Christopher told PTI.

The study, published recently in the journal PLOS Global Public Health, compared data from Europe and China. An Italy-based study, for instance, found dyspnoea or shortness of breath present in 43 per cent and cough in less than 20 per cent of the subjects. The corresponding figures from a Chinese study were also lower than those seen in the Indian study.

Also Read | Lung abnormalities found in long COVID patients with breathlessness

However, the CMC study did not cite any specific data from China or from European countries other than Italy.

In terms of co-morbidities, CMS Vellore researchers found 72.5% of individuals reporting underlying health conditions such as diabetes mellitus, systemic hypertension, and chronic lung diseases.

Lung function tests revealed a concerning trend of impairment, particularly in diffusion capacity (DLCO), a sensitive test to assess the lungs' ability to transfer gas from inspired air to the bloodstream, the researchers said.

Nearly half (44.4%) of the participants showed impaired diffusing capacity, with rates of impairment being higher in those with more severe COVID-19 infection. Therefore, those who needed invasive or non-invasive ventilation and had recovered had the worst lung function impairment.

Links to high TB prevalence, air pollution

Reacting to the study findings, Delhi-based pulmonologist Vivek Nangia said the most unique feature that predisposes Indians to greater damage to COVID-19 or disease-induced lung injury could be a high prevalence of tuberculosis in the country, which is weakening our immune system and also damaging the lungs.

India accounts for about 25% of the global TB burden, with an estimated disease incidence of 2.77 million in 2022, according to a study published last year in the Journal of Infection and Public Health.

However, Dr. Christopher said none of the study subjects had features of active TB at the time of recruitment to the study.

“A second factor that could explain the worse lung damage is the air pollution, which of course is reducing our immunity and damaging the lungs,” Dr. Nangia, principal director and head of pulmonology, at Saket’s Max Super Speciality Hospital, Saket, told PTI.

Deepak Sharma, consultant pulmonologist, Ujala Cygnus Group of Hospitals, Delhi agreed. “Access to quality healthcare during and after the infection can influence recovery outcomes. Also, pollution, particularly in densely populated areas, could exacerbate respiratory issues and hinder recovery,” he told PTI.

Although the study sample is small, he added, several factors could contribute to these outcomes, including the severity of the infection.

“Those with severe COVID-19 cases may experience more pronounced long-term effects on lung function and overall health. Individuals with pre-existing respiratory conditions or other co-morbidities may make patients more susceptible to lasting effects from the virus,” Dr, Sharma said.

While pollution is likely a contributing factor, the experts noted that other variables such as genetics, lifestyle factors, and healthcare infrastructure also play crucial roles.

“In the future what we're going to see is a significant rise in the number of cases of respiratory diseases. This could be in terms of interstitial lung disease, could be in terms of lung cancer, in terms of respiratory infections,” Dr. Sharma said.

“Even now what we're seeing is that minor viral infections are turning into very severe kind of illnesses requiring hospitalisation, ICU care and are even resulting in mortality,” he added.

Extrapolating the findings of his study, Dr. Christopher noted that in the long run, these patients might end up with lungs that function less than optimally.

“The impact on their lung function may improve for up to one year, but some patients may have to live with scared lungs all their lives. If the impairment is relatively smaller, they will carry on with normal activities of life but it may limit their exercise capacity. If it is severe it may become an impediment on a daily basis straight away and a few may be oxygen dependent,” he added.

Addressing these factors requires a multi-faceted approach, including improving healthcare access, reducing pollution levels, and implementing targeted interventions for at-risk populations, the doctors said.

Dr. Nangia said the implications of the study reveal potential long-term health challenges for Indians who have recovered from OVID-19, including lung function impairment and lingering symptoms.

“This suggests a need for comprehensive post-recovery care and monitoring to address these issues,” he explained.

How does one decrease the risk of disease? Regular exercise and yoga, Dr. Nangia said. Appropriate vaccinations may reduce lung infections and thus offer protection. Avoiding air pollution outside can help, he added.

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Once energetic and vibrant, Pradeep Tewari, a seasoned journalist never anticipated that the Covid virus, which has partially damaged his lung, could be so profound and life-altering. Despite eventually recovering from the acute phase of the illness, Tewari continues to grapple with debilitating  scars in the lung tissue and persistent respiratory symptoms.

As a result, he finds himself feeling trapped by his own body, unable to fully participate in family gatherings or official events or even complete simple tasks like climbing stairs or taking a short walk without gasping for breath.

But the inability to lift his small daughter in his arms due to his weakened lungs is one of the most distressing feelings he experiences. Tewari shares that it’s heartbreaking to see her reach out, expecting to be held, only to be met with his physical limitations.

Tewari’s case serves as a poignant example that reflects in the findings of a recent study conducted by doctors from the Christian Medical College, (CMC) Vellore to investigate the impact of Covid-19 on lung function.

The researchers examined 207 individuals, showcasing substantial impairment in lung function, exercise capacity, and quality of life among recovered individuals.  It revealed a high prevalence of respiratory symptoms among Indians who recovered, even after a mean of over two months following acute illness, with shortness of breath reported in 49.3 per cent and cough in 27.1 per cent of the cohort. The study is published in the journal PLOS Global Public Health.

“It is clear from the study that lung function is affected more in the Indian population compared to data from other countries across every category of disease severity,” said study lead researcher D J Christopher, professor of pulmonary medicine at CMC Vellore, while comparing data from Europe and China.

An Italy-based study, for instance, found dyspnoea or shortness of breath present in 43 per cent and cough in less than 20 per cent of the subjects. The corresponding figures from a Chinese study were also lower than those seen in the Indian study.  In terms of co-morbidities, Christian Medical College (CMC) Vellore researchers found 72.5 per cent of individuals reporting underlying health conditions such as diabetes mellitus, systemic hypertension, and chronic lung diseases.

However, Christopher said none of the study subjects had features of active TB at the time of recruitment to the study.

“This study underscores the urgent need for comprehensive post-recovery care and preventive measures to address the long-term health implications of Covid-19 on lung health and overall well-being. This also indicates that there is an anticipated rise in respiratory diseases, including interstitial lung disease (ILD) and lung cancer, among Covid-19 survivors.

As he battles with Long Covid impacts which have partially damaged his lungs and left him disabled in many ways, Tewari now hopes that the study will serve as a wake-up call for the Government to focus its attention to the plight of the patients suffering with Long Covid-19. “There is a need for comprehensive post-recovery care and monitoring as essential services to address these long-term health challenges being faced by patients like us. There is a need to mitigate the risk of lasting lung function impairment,” he says.

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New Delhi, Indians suffer high rates of lung function damage after acute Covid with about half reporting shortness of breath, according to a recent study, a worrying finding that experts attribute to various reasons, including co-morbidities and pollution. The study by the Christian Medical College, Vellore, is the largest from India to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on lung function. It examined 207 individuals, showcasing substantial impairment in lung function, exercise capacity, and quality of life among recovered individuals.

The study revealed a high prevalence of respiratory symptoms among Indians who recovered, even after a mean of over two months following acute illness, with shortness of breath reported in 49.3 per cent and cough in 27.1 per cent of the cohort.

"It is clear from the study that lung function is affected more in the Indian population compared to data from other countries across every category of disease severity," said study lead researcher D J Christopher, professor of pulmonary medicine at CMC Vellore.

"Although it is impossible to know the exact cause of worse impairment among Indians, co-morbidities may be a factor contributing to lung damage, as our population had much higher co-morbidities than the others " Christopher told PTI.

The study, published recently in the journal PLOS Global Public Health, compared data from Europe and China. An Italy-based study, for instance, found dyspnoea or shortness of breath present in 43 per cent and cough in less than 20 per cent of the subjects. The corresponding figures from a Chinese study were also lower than those seen in the Indian study.

However, the CMC study did not cite any specific data from China or from European countries other than Italy. In terms of co-morbidities, CMS Vellore researchers found 72.5 per cent of individuals reporting underlying health conditions such as diabetes mellitus, systemic hypertension, and chronic lung diseases. Lung function tests revealed a concerning trend of impairment, particularly in diffusion capacity (DLCO), a sensitive test to assess the lungs' ability to transfer gas from inspired air to the bloodstream, the researchers said.

Nearly half (44.4 per cent) of the participants showed impaired diffusing capacity, with rates of impairment being higher in those with more severe Covid infection. Therefore, those who needed invasive or non-invasive ventilation and had recovered had the worst lung function impairment.

Reacting to the study findings, Delhi-based pulmonologist Vivek Nangia said the most unique feature that predisposes Indians to greater damage to Covid or disease-induced lung injury could be a high prevalence of tuberculosis in the country, which is weakening our immune system and also damaging the lungs.

India accounts for about 25 per cent of the global TB burden, with an estimated disease incidence of 2.77 million in 2022, according to a study published last year in the Journal of Infection and Public Health.

However, Christopher said none of the study subjects had features of active TB at the time of recruitment to the study.

"A second factor that could explain the worse lung damage is the air pollution, which of course is reducing our immunity and damaging the lungs," Nangia, principal director and head of pulmonology, at Saket's Max Super Speciality Hospital, Saket, told PTI.

Deepak Sharma, consultant pulmonologist, Ujala Cygnus Group of Hospitals, Delhi agreed.

"Access to quality healthcare during and after the infection can influence recovery outcomes. Also, pollution, particularly in densely populated areas, could exacerbate respiratory issues and hinder recovery," he told PTI.

Although the study sample is small, he added, several factors could contribute to these outcomes, including the severity of the infection.

"Those with severe Covid cases may experience more pronounced long-term effects on lung function and overall health. Individuals with pre-existing respiratory conditions or other co-morbidities may make patients more susceptible to lasting effects from the virus," Sharma said.

While pollution is likely a contributing factor, the experts noted that other variables such as genetics, lifestyle factors, and healthcare infrastructure also play crucial roles.

"In the future what we're going to see is a significant rise in the number of cases of respiratory diseases. This could be in terms of interstitial lung disease, could be in terms of lung cancer, in terms of respiratory infections," Sharma said.

"Even now what we're seeing is that minor viral infections are turning into very severe kind of illnesses requiring hospitalisation, ICU care and are even resulting in mortality," he added.

Extrapolating the findings of his study, Christopher noted that in the long run, these patients might end up with lungs that function less than optimally.

"The impact on their lung function may improve for up to one year, but some patients may have to live with scared lungs all their lives. If the impairment is relatively smaller, they will carry on with normal activities of life but it may limit their exercise capacity. If it is severe it may become an impediment on a daily basis straight away and a few may be oxygen dependent," he added.

Addressing these factors requires a multi-faceted approach, including improving healthcare access, reducing pollution levels, and implementing targeted interventions for at-risk populations, the doctors said.

Nangia said the implications of the study reveal potential long-term health challenges for Indians who have recovered from Covid, including lung function impairment and lingering symptoms.

"This suggests a need for comprehensive post-recovery care and monitoring to address these issues," he explained.

How does one decrease the risk of disease?

Regular exercise and yoga, Nangia said.

Appropriate vaccinations may reduce lung infections and thus offer protection, Avoiding air pollution outside can help, he added.

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OSHA cites Henry Brick Co. Inc. with 11 serious violations, proposes $124K in penalties

SELMA, AL – U.S. Department of Labor safety investigators found a Selma brick manufacturer exposed workers to silica crystalline respiratory hazards that have the potential to lead to lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and kidney disease. 

The department’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited Henry Brick Co. Inc. – a clay brick manufacturer – with 11 serious citations and proposed $124,212 in penalties. Specifically, the agency found the employer: 

  • Exposed workers to airborne concentrations of respirable crystalline silica of up to six-and-a-half times the permissible exposure level. 
  • Failed to evaluate and implement engineering controls and work practices to reduce and maintain employee exposure to respirable crystalline silica to or below the permissible exposure. 
  • Failed to provide effective training on crystalline silica to employees exposed over the permissible exposure level. 
  • Neglected to offer free medical surveillance, at a reasonable time and place, to employees exposed to respirable crystalline silica above the action level for 30 or more days per year.
  • Required employees to wear respirators without first providing training as required.
  • Neglected to fit test or provide medical evaluation for workers required to wear respirators
  • Allowed employees to work in areas that required respirators without providing a respiratory protection program that met requirements.

“Crystalline silica can be deadly. Workers who are overexposed to it can contract incurable, progressively disabling and sometimes fatal illnesses. This is why employers must take every precaution to protect employees from this danger,” said OSHA Area Office Director Jose Gonzalez in Mobile, Alabama. “Employers with questions about how to develop respiratory protection programs can contact our trained professionals for assistance.”

Nearly 2.3 million workers in the U.S. are exposed to silica while on the job. Breathing crystalline silica can cause multiple diseases, including incurable lung disease that can lead to disability and death. To help protect workers, OSHA has issued two respirable crystalline silica standards. Learn more about crystalline silica.

The company has 15 business days from receipt of their citations and penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission

Visit OSHA’s website for information on developing a workplace safety and health program. Employers can also contact the agency for information about OSHA’s compliance assistance resources and for free help on complying with OSHA standards

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At 9 on a cold January morning, Sami Iqbal got ready for work at his home in Lahore’s old quarter, a stone’s throw from the historic Badshahi Mosque. It was 6 degrees Celsius and the city was beginning to come alive — chai stalls in the vicinity pushed open their shutters and the doughy smell of flatbreads puffing up in iron skillets filled the air. Iqbal wrapped a muffler around his face before revving up his Honda motorbike to begin his day as a bike-taxi rider. 

Iqbal is a self-employed gig worker who works across multiple ride-hailing apps, including Careem, Bykea, and inDrive. As he set off for his first job that day, the city was covered in a thick, poisonous smog. He drove through visible specks of reddish dust and other particulate matter, breathing through his muffler and trying to ignore the metallic, almost sulfurous stench permeating his nostrils.

“I’ve been ill for a week,” Iqbal told Rest of World, his voice hoarse. “It’s probably because of the smog. I’m on the road for so long.”

Lahore is the most polluted city in the world, according to Swiss air quality monitoring platform IQAir. In November, the air was so poisonous that authorities issued a citywide lockdown, closing schools, markets, and parks for four days, and advising people to stay indoors.

Other cities in South Asia have similarly alarming levels of air quality: Eight out of the top 10 most polluted cities globally are in the region. Causes include rapid urbanization, construction, vehicular pollution, coal-fueled power plants, crop burning, and the operation of brick kilns. Air quality in the region is at its worst from October to February due to atmospheric conditions which cause pollutants to be trapped closer to the ground.

Exposure to this pollution can have serious health impacts — from headaches and breathing difficulties to heart and lung disease, stroke, and cancer. For gig workers, who often have no choice but to work in the smog, the effects are clear. By the end of a day’s work, Iqbal said, his whole body feels lifeless. “I also experience exhaustion, I get a lot of headaches. I get body aches,” he said.

Rest of World spoke to 25 gig workers in Lahore, New Delhi, and Dhaka, all of whom reported symptoms that health experts believe are the consequence of routine exposure to carcinogenic pollutants, including eye and throat irritation, persistent coughs, dizziness, and nausea. “I can’t even stand because of how tired I get, and most days I just cough and cough the entire shift,” Sachin Gupta, a 29-year-old Swiggy and Zomato delivery worker in New Delhi, told Rest of World.

“Outdoor workers are particularly vulnerable because of the number of pollutants they’re inhaling,” Muhammad Irfan Malik, a pulmonologist in Lahore, told Rest of World. “Pollution [has become] an invisible killer that we are seeing all year long.”

To better understand air quality exposure among gig workers in South Asia, Rest of World gave three gig workers — one each in Lahore, New Delhi, and Dhaka — air quality monitors to wear throughout a regular shift in January. The Atmotube Pro monitors continually tracked their exposure to carcinogenic pollutants — specifically PM1, PM2.5, and PM10 (different sizes of particulate matter), and volatile organic compounds such as benzene and formaldehyde.

The data revealed that all three workers were routinely exposed to hazardous levels of pollutants. For PM2.5, referring to particulates that are 2.5 micrometers in diameter or less — which have been linked to health risks including heart attacks and strokes — all riders were consistently logging exposure levels more than 10 times the World Health Organization’s recommended daily average of 15 micrograms per cubic meter. Manu Sharma, in New Delhi, recorded the highest PM2.5 level of the three riders, hitting 468.3 micrograms per cubic meter around 6 p.m. Lahore was a close second, with Iqbal recording 464.2 micrograms per cubic meter around the same time.

A line chart showing the PM levels during a set amount of time recorded in Lahore.

Alongside tracking specific pollutants, the Atmotube Pro gives an overall real-time air quality score (AQS) from 0–100, with zero being the most severely polluted, and 100 being the cleanest. According to Atmo, the company that makes the Atmotube monitors, a reading of 0–20 should be considered a health alert, under which conditions “everyone should avoid all outdoor exertion.” But the three gig workers found their monitors consistently displayed the lowest possible score. 

As Iqbal went about his work picking up and dropping off customers, his pollution monitor barely budged from a score of zero. “Is this device even working?” he asked.

He only briefly achieved a score over 40 — considered simply “polluted” — when he went indoors to eat lunch and pray.

An evening street scene in Dhaka.

Rest of World followed gig workers during their shifts in three of the world’s most polluted cities.

A portrait of RedX delivery rider MD. Nur Afsar taken indoors.

In Dhaka, we met with 30-year-old Mohammad Noor Afsar, who is all too familiar with the city’s pollution — first as a battery salesman and now as a delivery person.

A bicycle with a delivery box attached to the rear.

Afsar rides a bicycle for RedX, a logistics company with a vast delivery network across Bangladesh.

A RedX delivery rider sips tea on a break at a road side tea stall.

“School traffic clogs the roads twice daily, with private car fumes choking the air,” Afsar said. “It’s a nightmare on a bike.”

Danger to health

When Manu Sharma, a 35-year-old rider for Indian food delivery platform Swiggy, set out for his shift on his electric bike around 2:45 p.m. that day, he couldn’t see through the smoke in the air. “There is so much pollution and smog that I can’t even see the next building,” he told Rest of World

Intrigued by Rest of World’s experiment, Sharma initially doubted there was anything left to learn about New Delhi’s polluted air. “You can just have a look around, and with decreasing visibility it’s obvious,” he said. He hadn’t noticed any health issues until he started gig work, and now has constant headaches and fever, Sharma said. He often feels as if he cannot breathe. When he heads out to work, he wears a cloth mask over his face. “In a few days, I think we will have to carry oxygen cylinders with us,” he joked. 

But as Sharma’s shift came to an end around 7:45 p.m., he was concerned about what the pollution monitor showed he had been inhaling through the day. Similar to Iqbal, the device’s AQS reading had been stuck on zero for the majority of the day, with PM2.5 levels mostly oscillating between 100–200 micrograms per cubic meter. Sharma, who moved to New Delhi from the eastern state of Bihar in July, said he is now contemplating moving back out of the city.

A line chart showing the PM levels during a set amount of time recorded in New Delhi.

Mohammad Noor Afsar, the 30-year-old RedX delivery rider who carried the Atmo device for Rest of World on a foggy January morning in Dhaka, has been battling the fumes from the city’s traffic for years. Before joining the courier service, he worked as a battery salesman. Though it has been a welcome change, he said, he continues to struggle with the pollution.

As traffic intensified around him toward the evening, so did the air’s heaviness. The metallic tang of exhaust, the grit of dust — Afsar felt the grim cocktail filling his lungs. “You can just feel the pollution,” he said. “But thankfully, my shift ends soon.”

Just as for Iqbal and Sharma, the air quality monitor showed Afsar was routinely breathing in much higher levels of PM2.5 and PM10 than are considered healthy. A single notable moment of respite — visible in the data — occurred around 7 p.m., when Afsar retreated to his office for a while. Even then, PM levels were well above the WHO’s guidelines.

Among health experts, PM2.5 is a particular concern. According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, particles of this size can get deep into the lungs, and some particles may even get into the bloodstream. Health effects attributable to long-term exposure to PM2.5 include “ischemic heart disease, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lower-respiratory infections (such as pneumonia), stroke, type 2 diabetes, and adverse birth outcomes,” according to the State of Global Air initiative, a collaborative project which analyzes trends in air quality around the world.

“There is so much pollution and smog that I can’t even see the next building.”

As South Asia’s megacities top global air pollution rankings, hospitals are piling up with patients suffering from pollution-related illnesses. In November, a pulmonologist at New Delhi’s Manipal Hospital noted that up to 50% of the beds in their intensive care unit had filled up with patients who had respiratory illnesses such as pneumonia and asthma, despite having no history of these conditions. 

Physicians Rest of World spoke with sounded alarm bells. “We’ve found people who don’t have a family history of asthma coming to us with severe lung disease,” Malik, the Lahore-based pulmonologist, said. “This is called chemical-induced lung injury because of exposure to particulate matter, such as PM2.5.”

A line chart showing the PM levels during a set amount of time recorded in Dhaka.

Malik and his colleagues have now begun to associate cases of respiratory distress with a new subclassification of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease called COPD-P — in which P stands for pollution. 

Neetu Jain, a New Delhi-based pulmonologist, has also been witnessing a rise in patients reporting coughs, shortness of breath, and wheezing. “There is a definite increase in viral and bacterial lung infections,” she told Rest of World

Pollution-related conditions can have long-term health impacts. The 2023 Air Quality Life Index, carried out by the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago, found that air pollution shortens lives by an average of 11.9 years in New Delhi, 8.1 years in Dhaka, and 7.5 years in Lahore. A nonprofit called Fair Finance Pakistan has estimated that air pollution leads to at least 128,000 deaths every year in the country. In India, pollution has led to more than 1.6 million premature deaths, according to a 2019 study by The Lancet. And in Bangladesh, the World Bank projects that air pollution will be responsible for 186,000 premature deaths by 2030. 

Although pollution can affect anyone exposed to it, delivery riders are particularly vulnerable owing to the nature of their work: They are outside for extended periods of time, often on congested streets, with little shelter from the smog.

In September 2020, environmental scientist Ahmad Kamruzzaman Majumder from the Center for Atmospheric Pollution Studies in Dhaka and three other researchers published a case study on the impact of air pollution on rickshaw pullers in Dhaka. Majumder and his team spoke with 35 rickshaw pullers — all non-smokers with no history of respiratory issues — and measured their lung function. 

“The majority of the respondents had various seasonal and environmental disorders since coming to Dhaka,” Majumder told Rest of World. “Forty-six percent of the respondents mostly had eye irritation, fever, and cough during winter, which decreased their ability to pull their rickshaws.”

A study on gig workers in Ghaziabad, a city adjoining New Delhi, found that they were exposed to levels of particulate matter and carcinogenic compounds such as benzene that were much higher than the safe levels set by local authorities and the WHO. 

Mannu Kumar, Zomato’s delivery partner speaks on his phone while parked on a busy street.

Manu Sharma, 35, works as a delivery rider for Indian online food delivery giant Swiggy in New Delhi.

A closeup of a car exhaust with fumes next to a motorbike.

Sharma did not have health issues until he moved to New Delhi from Bihar, a state in eastern India, eight months ago.

Zomato’s Delivery partner Mannu Kumar, on his way to pickup an order from Khan Market.

After experiencing frequent headaches and bouts of fever, Sharma said he is considering moving back to his village.

Zomato's delivery partner, Mannu Kumar, checks his phone while parked on his bike by a street.

“I haven’t seen the sun rise in this city for almost two weeks,” Sharma said. “This job and this city are not for me.”

Broken solutions

Part of the reason air quality is so poor in these South Asian cities is due to what environmental author Siddharth Singh calls a “meteorological misfortune.” In his book The Great Smog of India, he explains that the landlocked parts of the country are geographically positioned such that the winds from the coastal regions collect pollutants on their way inland, which then get “trapped” before the Himalayas. “The air pressure pushes from one direction, and with the inability to escape quickly in the other, the particulate matter accumulates over the northern plains,” he writes. “This accumulation and entrapment affect not only Delhi, but the entire expanse between Punjab in the west to West Bengal in the east.”

Abid Omar, founder of the Pakistan Air Quality Initiative, a think tank focused on air pollution research, told Rest of World this affects other South Asian cities too, especially in winter. “That misfortune is what results in temperature inversion, which keeps the pollution trapped close to the lower atmosphere, where it builds up,” he said. Temperature inversion occurs as warmer air rises, trapping pollutants in a blanket of cooler air close to the Earth’s surface, such that they can’t escape. It is also why pollution isn’t such a visible problem in the summer months, even if the number of harmful emissions does not change. 

Iqbal, the Lahore-based bike-taxi rider, noted that he experienced more symptoms in the winter months. “I’ve ridden my bike in the summer months, too. The effects aren’t as adverse,” he said. “I don’t experience eye irritation in the summer. But I do in the winter.”

On the day Rest of World followed Iqbal, he could not stop coughing through his muffler by the time he finished work. “I’ve been ill for a week, have had fever, chills, and a bad cough,” he said. “You could say that my cough is due to air pollution, because I’m out on the road for up to 10–12 hours a day.”

Measures of air quality

PM1

Particulate matter (PM) refers to microscopic particles in the air that are small enough to be inhaled. These can include dust, dirt, or soot. PM1 are particles equal to or less than a single micrometer in diameter.

PM2.5

PM2.5 — any particulate matter that is 2.5 micrometers or less in diameter — is particularly harmful to human health, causing conditions including heart disease and lung cancer.

PM10

All particulate matter under 10 micrometers in diameter is of concern, as these particles are small enough to get into the lungs and may even enter the bloodstream.

VOCs

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are gasses that can harm human health, and include benzene and formaldehyde. Most come from manmade sources such as solvents and industrial emissions.

AQI

Air Quality Index (AQI) is an overall measurement of air quality, based on the density of pollutants in the air. The best score is 0; the worst is 500.

AQS

AQS is Atmo’s own overall air quality score, intended to give a real-time idea of general air quality. For AQS, 100 represents the cleanest air; 0 is the most polluted.

Temperature

Temperature can impact air quality in different ways. One phenomenon is temperature inversion, which occurs when a layer of warm air traps cooler air — and the pollutants in it — closer to the Earth’s surface.

As pollution climbs to worrying levels in the subcontinent, local governments are scrambling for solutions. In Lahore, some officials are washing roads in an attempt to reduce dust and other pollutants, while others are trying out a technology called cloud seeding to create artificial rain in 10 locations around the city using a small Cessna plane. Indian scientists, too, are mulling the use of cloud seeding to trigger heavy rain in some parts of New Delhi.

In Bangladesh, officials have brought in carbon taxes in an attempt to reduce the number of vehicles on the road — a measure they claim will help decrease both the emissions and traffic congestion. But experts say these attempts aren’t tackling the biggest source of Dhaka’s pollution: the at least 1,252 brick kilns operating in the suburbs, which account for more than 58% of the pollutants circulating in the city’s air. 

Similarly, Omar, of the Pakistan Air Quality Initiative, said cosmetic technical fixes like road washing do not solve air pollution. Instead, he said, the country’s environmental laws should be improved and enforced. “You have to measure factory emissions, make sure they stay within certain limits. And there are different standards that apply to a cement plant versus a power plant. All of these rules and regulations exist, but they’re not enforced.”

In some cases, gig workers told Rest of World the attempts to reduce the effects of pollution had had negative impacts for them. Iqbal, the bike-taxi rider in Lahore, said he spent more time on the road when Lahore locked down some institutions due to pollution. “Because people were out and about, there was actually more traffic on the streets,” he said.

“[Lockdowns to reduce pollution] don’t help in a city like Lahore where there aren’t alternatives for transport,” Hassan Aftab Sheikh, a climate scientist from Lahore based in Oxford, told Rest of World. “You need to have alternatives for mobility if you’re restricting mobility.” 

Gig platforms operating in these cities are aware of the pollution their workers face. In a November social post, Indian food delivery giant Zomato even joked about the conditions, telling customers that their chat support “can’t help if your chicken gets delivered as smoked chicken.” 

In November 2020, Pakistan’s leading ride-hailing platform, Careem, distributed “smog kits” — consisting of masks, paracetamol, and nasal spray — to its riders in Islamabad and Lahore. Careem’s parent company, Uber, had launched a similar initiative in Lahore in 2017.

Rest of World asked Careem if these kits are still being distributed among riders, but received no response. Rest of World also reached out to Pathao, Bykea, inDrive, Zomato, and Swiggy to ask if they had introduced smog-combating initiatives — such as mask mandates or smog kits — for riders, or offered any other accommodations. Most did not reply; Zomato and Swiggy declined to comment.

Delivery rider Sami Iqbal checks his phone by the side of street covered in smog.

Thirty-two-year-old Sami Iqbal has been a gig worker in Lahore since 2019.

A road beneath an overpass in Lahore, Pakistan with heavy smog.

He spends 10 hours a day riding a motorbike-taxi, and earns about 90,000 rupees ($322) a month.

A closeup of people riding a bike near a street market in Lahore.

Scientists say Lahore’s residents may lose up to seven years of life expectancy from breathing toxic air.

A phone showing the air quality through the Atmotube app in Lahore.

“My whole body feels lifeless by the time I get home,” Iqbal said.

Inequity in breathing

Gig workers told Rest of World they were left with no choice but to continue working on the streets, breathing toxic air day in and day out. 

Gupta, the New Delhi-based delivery worker, said he was “well aware” that his health symptoms were a direct fallout of the severe pollution, but that he couldn’t quit the work — even though his family had asked him to. “We can’t quit the job just because of pollution and risk our livelihood, can we? We aren’t that privileged,” he said.

Malik, the pulmonologist from Lahore, has been telling his patients with COPD and asthma to consider moving away from the city. “But when I suggest this to them, they look at me, and they cry,” he said. “They say, ‘Where will we go? We don’t have money to resettle. Where will we work?’”

Though the air has changed for everyone in the region, there remains an “inequity in exposure to air pollution,” Pallavi Pant, an air quality scientist from New Delhi, told Rest of World. “Who among us has the means to reduce exposure? Many people are getting exposed to high levels of air pollution as a result of their job or their occupation. How can we best protect people knowing that some cannot afford to sit at home, or purchase air purifiers?” 

Many workers told Rest of World they were also concerned about the impact of pollution on their families. Lahore-based Foodpanda delivery rider Rizwan Khan said he had considered sending his children away for short stretches to their grandfather’s village, just so they could breathe fresh air. “You know kids, they want to run around outside and want fresh air, but the air is so poisonous. I can’t keep them shut inside the house,” he said. Khan’s youngest, a 2-year-old boy, has a wheezing cough. “You can hear a whistling sound.”

Iyaz Kamran, 30, who works with inDrive in Lahore, migrated to the city with his wife and two children in 2019. Now, his 6-year-old daughter has been diagnosed with asthma, and he takes her to Sir Ganga Ram Hospital every few days so she can get nebulized — a treatment for the condition. “I can’t afford to buy a nebulizer because it costs 60,000 rupees [$215] and that’s how much I make in a month,” he told Rest of World. But Kamran said he can’t go back home to Hafizabad, where the air is cleaner and there are fields where his children can run and play. 

“What will I do there? Sit at home? Over here, my wife has started working … We are able to feed our children, send them to English-medium schools, [and] secure their futures,” he said. “I will stay in Lahore, and maybe my children will have a better life than me.”



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Lung Clear Pro is a 7-second ritual that claims to clear stuck mucus and help with breathlessness in just four days.

Available exclusively online through TruthAboutLungs.com, the supplement uses a blend of natural ingredients to help with coughing, mucus, and respiratory tract health without the side effects or cost of medication.

Does Lung Clear Pro really work? How does Lung Clear Pro clear your airways? Keep reading to find out everything you need to know about Lung Clear Pro and how it works today in our review.

What is Lung Clear Pro?

Lung Clear Pro is a liquid nutritional supplement available through TruthAboutLungs.com.

The supplement was specifically formulated to promote respiratory health. By taking drops of the formula daily, you can purportedly help support clearer breathing, flush away mucus, and promote overall respiratory health.

Lung Clear Pro is primarily marketed to people with stuck mucus, breathlessness, low blood oxygen levels, and other respiratory health issues. Some take it because they want to solve their problem without expensive or dangerous medication, while others take it because they want to avoid inhalers and other solutions.

Lung Clear Pro was developed by Mark Silva, a lung rejuvenation specialist based in Arizona. After treating thousands of patients with breathing issues over the years, Mark created Lung Clear Pro as part of a 7-second daily ritual for permanently clearing airways.

Lung Clear Pro is priced at $79 per bottle and is backed by a 180-day money-back guarantee.

Lung Clear Pro Benefits

Some of the benefits of Lung Clear Pro, according to the official website, include:

  • Help keep lungs healthy
  • Helps with deep, clear breathing
  • Helps flush out mucus, attacking a root cause of breathing problems
  • Helps you enjoy walks and other normal activities again
  • Includes 6 premium lung-healing nutrients
  • Backed by 180-day moneyback guarantee

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How Does Lung Clear Pro Work?

Lung Clear Pro works by targeting the root cause of respiratory health problems: stubborn, hard mucus that clogs your lungs, making it harder to breathe.

The makers of Lung Clear Pro specifically advertise the formula as an alternative to other respiratory health solutions – like inhalers, prescription medication, and over-the-counter drugs.

Some conventional respiratory health solutions are dangerous, according to the manufacturer, while others only mask symptoms, causing your problems to return time and time again.

Lung Clear Pro doesn’t just target inflammation. Instead, it targets the root cause of that inflammation in the first place: an airborne toxin that causes mucus in your lungs and airways, leading to inflammation.

To activate these benefits, just take one full dropper of Lung Clear Pro daily. Each dropper of Lung Clear Pro contains six active ingredients – including mullein, bromelain, and others – to promote clear breathing.

Who Should Use Lung Clear Pro?

Some people take Lung Clear Pro to help with breathing disorders and respiratory issues. Others take it because they live in polluted cities or are dealing with wildfire smoke.

The manufacturer of Lung Clear Pro specifically recommends it to smokers, people with allergies and asthma, and even those with long COVID, COPD, and other serious medical conditions:

“Lung Clear Pro works if you’ve smoked for 20 years, have asthma, allergies, long COVID, suffer from COPD or just live in polluted cities!”

Some of the people who could benefit from Lung Clear Pro, according to the manufacturer, include:

  1. Smokers and former smokers
  2. Anyone with mucus buildup in the lungs and airways or trouble clearing their throat
  3. People with asthma or allergies
  4. Those with long COVID
  5. Patients with COPD
  6. Anyone living with wildfire smoke or air pollution

Whether targeting a medical condition or supporting general respiratory health, Lung Clear Pro aims to be the best respiratory health supplement on the market.

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How to Take Lung Clear Pro

The makers of Lung Clear Pro recommend taking one serving of Lung Clear Pro before meals with a glass of water:

Place 1 full dropper of Lung Clear Pro into a glass of water or the beverage of your choice, then drink as normal

For best results, take Lung Clear Pro 20 minutes before meals

Some customers also take Lung Clear Pro sublingually, holding the liquid under their tongue for maximum absorption before swallowing. You can place the dropper directly in your mouth or add it to the beverage of your choice.

Lung Clear Pro Ingredients

Lung Clear Pro contains six natural, science-backed ingredients to promote the healing of your lungs.

By taking the Lung Clear Pro liquid formula daily, you can allow these ingredients to go to work from the inside out. They enter your bloodstream through the sensitive blood vessels around your mouth, then circulate throughout your body, eventually reaching the blood vessels leading to your lungs and airway.

Here are the six active ingredients in Lung Clear Pro and how they work, according to the manufacturer:

Mullein:

Mullein tea has been used for centuries as a natural solution for respiratory health problems. The makers of Lung Clear Pro condensed the plant extract into a liquefied form, concentrating it for superior absorption and bioavailability. Mullein, according to Mark Silva, “acts like an army of soldiers,” marching to your lungs to clear away toxins, black carbon, and mucus.

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Bromelain:

Bromelain is a natural enzyme found in pineapple and certain other foods. It’s typically found in digestive health supplements, but it’s also found in a growing number of respiratory supplements. Studies show bromelain can help clear airways and the mucus within your airways, supporting overall breathing. Bromelain “has a powerful anti-inflammatory effect on lung tissue and cells,” according to Mark Silva, which is why he added it to the formula.

Cordyceps:

Cordyceps is a mushroom extract used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries as a general health and wellness aid. Some take it for cognition, while others take it for physical energy. Today, researchers believe cordyceps works because it’s packed with natural antioxidants called beta-glucans, helping to target toxins within your airways and support healthy inflammation. Cordyceps, according to Mark, “goes to work directly in the lungs to break down stuck mucus and quickly and automatically flush it from the lungs.”

Ginger:

Ginger has similar effects to cordyceps: it’s packed with natural antioxidants that could support healthy inflammation throughout your body. And, like cordyceps, ginger has been used in traditional Asian medicine practices for centuries. Mark describes ginger as a powerful superfood” that “has amazing lung health benefits, especially when it comes to stuck mucus.”

Lemon Peel:

Lemon peel is packed with citrus bioflavonoids, or natural molecules linked to healthy inflammation. Instead of eating lemons daily to get these bioflavonoids, you can get a concentrated version in each serving of Lung Clear Pro.

Other Ingredients: The official Lung Clear Pro website discloses five of the six active ingredients in the formula upfront. The company also does not disclose other, inactive ingredients within the formula – like sweeteners, additives, and preservatives that bind the formula together.

The Lung Clear Pro formula is gluten-free, GMO-free, BPA-free, and contains no added chemicals. According to the manufacturer, Lung Clear Pro also contains organic ingredients.

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What to Expect After Taking Lung Clear Pro

According to the makers of Lung Clear Pro, the supplement can promote benefits like:

  • Combat the #1 Lung Destroyer by Flushing Out Mucus-Causing Toxins: The primary goal of Lung Clear Pro is to combat the #1 lung destroyer: stuck mucus in your lungs caused by the toxins in black carbon. According to the team that created Lung Clear Pro, stuck mucus in your lungs is the root cause of breathing problems, respiratory health issues, and other disorders. After taking Lung Clear Pro, “you’ll be able to finally take deep, full breaths again,” according to the manufacturer. The supplement clears away the toxins that cause this mucus to build up in the first place.
  • Better Sleep: People with breathing problems tend to wake up at night because of coughing or low oxygen. According to the official Lung Clear Pro website, “waking up nightly with trouble breathing or coughing will be a thing of the past” after taking Lung Clear Pro.
  • Breathe Easy: People with mucus in their lungs tend to have difficulty breathing. The mucus clogs your airways and lungs, making it harder to get a full breath. According to the official Lung Clear Pro website, the supplement will allow you to “feel powerful, deep, clear breaths every day.”
  • Avoid the Feeling of Breathing Through a Straw: People with respiratory disease, mucus in their lungs, and other breathing disorders often feel like they’re breathing through a straw. According to the makers of Lung Clear Pro, the supplement can help you avoid this feeling, promoting deeper, clearer breaths every day.
  • Enjoy Everyday Activities & Exercise Again: Respiratory diseases and breathing disorders can make it hard to enjoy normal activities – like a walk in the park. Lung Clear Pro can purportedly help you “enjoy everyday activities again like walking without breathing troubles,” according to the manufacturer.
  • Improve Blood Oxygen Levels: Many people who take Lung Clear Pro do so because they have low blood oxygen levels. Generally, your blood oxygen levels should be well above 90%. Levels below 90% can lead to breathlessness, poor stamina, and an increased risk of cognitive and physical health problems. According to the makers of Lung Clear Pro, the supplement can help “improve blood oxygen levels from the comfort of home.”
  • Flush Away Lung Toxins: The makers of Lung Clear Pro developed the formula based on the idea people with breathing problems have a common root problem: toxins in the lungs.
  • Other Benefits – From Sex Drive to Anti-Aging Benefits: According to the makers of Lung Clear Pro, you’ll feel lighter, happier, and more in control after using Lung Clear Pro. The formula can even help with sex drive, anti-aging effects, and more, according to the manufacturer.

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Lung Clear Pro Targets the True Cause of Breathing Problems: A Common Toxin in Your Lungs

Typically, doctors blame breathing problems on age, smoking, genetics, or environmental pollution.

The makers of Lung Clear Pro acknowledge these factors can “contribute” to lung problems. However, they claim all people with lung problems have a common root cause: a toxin within your lungs that causes thick, stuck mucus to accumulate.

Making matters worse, this toxin is particularly common in the United States. The makers of Lung Clear Pro claim it’s more widespread in America “than anywhere else in the world.”

Have you ever wondered why some people smoke two packs a day and live to 100 – while others die from lung cancer in their 40s? This specific toxin is the reason.

Some of the ingredients in Lung Clear Pro are specifically designed to target this toxin, helping to remove it from your body and eliminate the root cause of mucus and inflammation.

Lung Clear Pro Eliminates Black Carbon Toxins

Mark Silva, creator of Lung Clear Pro, found lung health disorders have skyrocketed in the United States over the last century. He wanted to determine why that was the case.

Mark traced the issue to black carbon, which is created when coal and other fuels are burned.

Starting in the 1840s and the Industrial Revolution, black carbon emissions increased dramatically, causing rates of lung cancer to also rise.

By taking Lung Clear Pro daily you can purportedly eliminate the toxin in black carbon that causes inflammation and mucus buildup in your airways.

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Lung Clear Pro is a 7-Second Lung Clearing Ritual

Many people who take Lung Clear Pro have rapidly cleared their lungs and airways using Lung Clear Pro.

Some feel relief immediately after taking Lung Clear Pro for the first time, while others notice dramatic improvements after four to 10 days.

According to the makers of Lung Clear Pro, the 7-second Lung Clear Pro ritual won’t just temporarily help your breathing problems; instead, it will permanently resolve them:

“This simple ritual will free you and your loved ones from coughing and breathing issues for good.”

While doctor-prescribed breathing medication can temporarily help, Lung Clear Pro is marketed as a permanent solution.

Who Created Lung Clear Pro?

Lung Clear Pro was created by a health professional named Mark Silva.

Mark introduces himself as a “lung rejuvenation specialist.” He claims to treat patients with respiratory health problems, breathing disorders, and other serious conditions. Mark doesn’t claim to be a medical doctor, although he does treat patients while wearing a stethoscope and lab coat.

Mark claims that, in 2024, he was voted the “Top Lung Rejuvenation Expert in Arizona.”

Before running a clinic in Arizona, Mark “practiced in Los Angeles, where [he] treated many well-known celebrities and athletes.”

Mark used his medical expertise and firsthand experience treating patients to develop the Lung Clear Pro formula.

Mark was motivated to create a solution to lung problems after witnessing his brother die in a fire at age 10 in his hometown of Toronto. Mark dedicated his life to making a real impact in the world.

Mark has a degree from the University of Toronto. Later, he specialized in “external respiratory factors,” exploring how the airway makes us sick.

Today, Mark uses his medical expertise to solve serious and unique lung problems for people across North America:

“Because of my deep and vast experience with real-world lung issues, I’m known across the US for solving complicated respiratory mysteries.”

To make a long story short, Mark used his experience treating patients with lung problems to develop the ultimate natural solution to respiratory health: Lung Clear Pro.

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Lung Clear Pro vs. Other Respiratory Health Solutions

Mark Silva claims many doctors recommend “failed solutions” for lung health problems. Mark recommends a different approach: taking Lung Clear Pro instead.

Here are some of the differences between Lung Clear Pro and “failed” respiratory health solutions:

Failed Solution #1: Neti Pots, Essential Oil Diffusers, & Similar Products: Neti pots and diffusers aim to clear out sinuses, lungs, and airways. However, Mark claims there’s almost “zero research” supporting these solutions. Some even make breathing problems worse. They contain harmful fragrances that irritate the lungs of people who didn’t have issues in the first place. Others have chemicals leading to fatigue, brain problems, inflammation, and more. Mark cites one study by researchers showing that 100% of essential oils contained volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Mark recommends “throwing it in the trash” if you have a Neti pot or similar solution at home.

Failed Solution #2: Prescription Medications, Nebulizers, & Albuterol Inhalers: Many doctors prescribe medications – like nebulizers and Alubertol inhalers – to treat breathing disorders. Mark admits these solutions can lower inflammation, but they only provide “temporary” relief. They don’t target the true cause of the inflammation, causing it to return time and time again. Even if a doctor prescribed these solutions to you, Mark seems to advise against it, recommending Lung Clear Pro and his 7-second instead.

Failed Solution #3: Oxygen Therapy & Pulmonary Rehabilitation: Mark describes oxygen therapy as a “last resort option.” It can provide relief, but it’s expensive and requires you to visit a clinic or be tied to a machine for the rest of your life.

Mark even advises against lung transplants because they have a “high risk of complications” while costing over $1 million.

Scientific Evidence for Lung Clear Pro

Can taking a liquid formula daily really solve your respiratory problems? What does science say about Lung Clear Pro? We’ll review some of the scientific evidence for Lung Clear Pro below.

First, Lung Clear Pro was developed by a medical professional Mark Silva, who claims to have firsthand experience treating respiratory health problems in patients. Although Mark doesn’t claim to be a medical doctor, he wears a white lab coat and stethoscope, suggesting he has formal medical or scientific experience and used that experience to develop Lung Clear Pro.

Visit the official website to get discounted prices!

Mark Silva and his team cite 9 studies on the Lung Clear Pro references page, including studies showing the dangers of particulate matter in the air and the benefits of specific ingredients in Lung Clear Pro. Mark cites one study, for example, showing indoor air pollution increased the risk of respiratory health problems in dogs.

The makers of Lung Clear Pro also cite research by the Cleveland Clinic showing how mullein, one of the active ingredients in Lung Clear Pro, “benefits your lungs.” As the Cleveland Clinic explains, people have been drinking mullein tea for respiratory health for centuries, and it’s becoming more popular in the nutritional supplement space today. Verbascum Thapsus, better known as mullein, is generally considered a weed, but studies show it can help with allergies, sore throat, and tonsillitis.

As further proof mullein works, Mark cites a 2012 study published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine. In that study, researchers found mullein was packed with flavonoids, saponins, tannins, and other natural molecules that helped to relax certain cells. Researchers tested mullein on roundworms and tapeworms and found they helped these organisms relax.

Bromelain could also promote anti-inflammatory effects in your lungs and airways. In a 2008 study, for example, researchers found bromelain exerted “anti-inflammatory effects” in mice with allergic airway disease. Bromelain is an enzyme found in pineapple extract and certain other foods. After being treated with bromelain, mice tended to experience a significant improvement in allergic airway disease (AAD). Mark Silva and his team cite a separate study showing bromelain could have potential therapeutic effects in respiratory complications caused by COVID-19.

Overall, Lung Clear Pro contains ingredients shown to help clear airways and promote respiratory health in different ways. However, there’s no evidence these natural ingredients can replace inhalers, doctor-prescribed respiratory medication, and other doctor-recommended solutions for respiratory disease.

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Lung Clear Pro Reviews: What Do Customers Say?

Lung Clear Pro seems primarily marketed to people with respiratory health problems, breathing disorders, mucus buildup in the lungs, and similar health issues.

Others, however, have taken it to help with air pollution, wildfire smoke, and other issues not related to chronic health problems.

Here are some of the reviews shared by verified purchasers on the official website and other sources online:

One 72-year-old customer started using Lung Clear Pro to combat wildfire smoke from summer fires in her area, finding it “really loosens up the airways.”

Many customers have been skeptical about Lung Clear Pro after being disappointed with other respiratory health solutions. One customer was “very skeptical” about Lung Clear Pro, for example, only to find the supplement worked as advertised to clear his lungs.

One customer claims he was a “lifelong smoker” and had to use an inhaler “several times a day” before taking Lung Clear Pro, claiming his “lungs felt like hard wet sponges” and it was “very hard to breathe.” After using Lung Clear Pro for just two weeks, however, he found his breathing is “so so much better.” Today, thanks to Lung Clear Pro, he “hardly” uses his inhaler at all and his chest feels “clear, light and airy.”

One 77-year-old customer claims he hadn’t had a clear breath in “years” before taking it. He used to spend four to five hours “hacking and coughing” to clear his airways. Since taking Lung Clear Pro, however, he clears his throat in around an hour with minimal discomfort. Today, thanks to Lung Clear Pro, his “breath is reaching the bottom” of his lungs and he feels “happy and exhilarated.”

One customer claims his breathing issues have “been diminished by about 90%” after taking Lung Clear Pro. He still has to clear his throat, but he finds it “effortless” to do so.

Many Lung Clear Pro customers are former smokers with severe breathing problems later in life – only to rapidly resolve those breathing problems with Lung Clear Pro. One ex-smoker, for example, was having “trouble breathing” before taking Lung Clear Pro and was frequently coughing up mucus. After taking 2mL of Lung Clear Pro daily, she found the problem had “almost completely cleared up.”

Overall, the official Lung Clear Pro website is filled with testimonials from verified purchasers who have resolved everything from serious breathing problems to general respiratory issues using the supplement.

Hear from real people who have used Lung Clear Pro >>>

Lung Clear Pro Pricing

Lung Clear Pro is priced at $79 per bottle or $79 for a one-month supply. All purchases come with free shipping, and you can save money by ordering multiple bottles of Lung Clear Pro per purchase.

Here’s how much you pay when ordering Lung Clear Pro through the official website today:

  • 1 Bottle: $79 + Free Shipping
  • 3 Bottles: $177 ($59 Per Bottle) + Free Shipping
  • 6 Bottles: $294 ($49 Per Bottle) + Free Shipping

Each bottle of Lung Clear Pro contains a one-month supply, or 30 servings (30 full droppers’ worth of liquid formula, or 60mL). You take one full dropper daily to promote clearer breathing.

The ordinary retail price of Lung Clear Pro is $147 per bottle. As part of a 2024 promotion, Mark and his team have lowered the price to $79 per bottle or less.

Act quickly to secure the limited-time discounted price today!

Lung Clear Pro Refund Policy

All Lung Clear Pro purchases have a 180-day money-back guarantee. You have 180 days (6 full months) to try the supplement and request a refund if you’re unhappy for any reason.

About Lung Clear Pro

Lung Clear Pro was created by a group of self-described “health enthusiasts,” including a lung rejuvenation expert named Mark Silva.

You can contact Mark Silva and the Lung Clear Pro customer service team via the following:

Lung Clear Pro is made at a lab in Ohio.

Final Word

Lung Clear Pro is a nutritional supplement marketed to people with respiratory health problems, difficulty breathing, and other lung health disorders.

By taking one full dropper’s worth of Lung Clear Pro daily, you can purportedly resolve these issues permanently, clearing a toxin from your body that causes stuck mucus to build up in your lungs in the first place.

(Flash Sale) Purchase Lung Clear Pro For The Lowest Prices!!

The news and editorial staff of the Santa Cruz Sentinel had no role in this post’s preparation. This is a paid advertisement and does not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Santa Cruz Sentinel, its employees, or subsidiaries.

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New Delhi: Indians suffer high rates of lung function damage after acute COVID with about half reporting shortness of breath, according to a recent study, a worrying finding that experts attribute to various reasons, including co-morbidities and pollution. The study by the Christian Medical College, Vellore, is the largest from India to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on lung function. It examined 207 individuals, showcasing substantial impairment in lung function, exercise capacity, and quality of life among recovered individuals.

The study revealed a high prevalence of respiratory symptoms among Indians who recovered, even after a mean of over two months following acute illness, with shortness of breath reported in 49.3 per cent and cough in 27.1 per cent of the cohort.

"It is clear from the study that lung function is affected more in the Indian population compared to data from other countries across every category of disease severity," said study lead researcher D J Christopher, professor of pulmonary medicine at CMC Vellore.

"Although it is impossible to know the exact cause of worse impairment among Indians, co-morbidities may be a factor contributing to lung damage, as our population had much higher co-morbidities than the others " Christopher told PTI.

The study, published recently in the journal PLOS Global Public Health, compared data from Europe and China. An Italy-based study, for instance, found dyspnoea or shortness of breath present in 43 per cent and cough in less than 20 per cent of the subjects. The corresponding figures from a Chinese study were also lower than those seen in the Indian study.

However, the CMC study did not cite any specific data from China or from European countries other than Italy.

In terms of co-morbidities, CMS Vellore researchers found 72.5 per cent of individuals reporting underlying health conditions such as diabetes mellitus, systemic hypertension, and chronic lung diseases.

Lung function tests revealed a concerning trend of impairment, particularly in diffusion capacity (DLCO), a sensitive test to assess the lungs' ability to transfer gas from inspired air to the bloodstream, the researchers said.

Nearly half (44.4 per cent) of the participants showed impaired diffusing capacity, with rates of impairment being higher in those with more severe COVID infection. Therefore, those who needed invasive or non-invasive ventilation and had recovered had the worst lung function impairment.

Reacting to the study findings, Delhi-based pulmonologist Vivek Nangia said the most unique feature that predisposes Indians to greater damage to COVID or disease-induced lung injury could be a high prevalence of tuberculosis in the country, which is weakening our immune system and also damaging the lungs.

India accounts for about 25 per cent of the global TB burden, with an estimated disease incidence of 2.77 million in 2022, according to a study published last year in the Journal of Infection and Public Health.

However, Christopher said none of the study subjects had features of active TB at the time of recruitment to the study.

"A second factor that could explain the worse lung damage is the air pollution, which of course is reducing our immunity and damaging the lungs," Nangia, principal director and head of pulmonology, at Saket's Max Super Speciality Hospital, Saket, told PTI.

Deepak Sharma, consultant pulmonologist, Ujala Cygnus Group of Hospitals, Delhi agreed.

"Access to quality healthcare during and after the infection can influence recovery outcomes. Also, pollution, particularly in densely populated areas, could exacerbate respiratory issues and hinder recovery," he told PTI.

Although the study sample is small, he added, several factors could contribute to these outcomes, including the severity of the infection.

"Those with severe COVID cases may experience more pronounced long-term effects on lung function and overall health. Individuals with pre-existing respiratory conditions or other co-morbidities may make patients more susceptible to lasting effects from the virus," Sharma said.

While pollution is likely a contributing factor, the experts noted that other variables such as genetics, lifestyle factors, and healthcare infrastructure also play crucial roles.

"In the future what we're going to see is a significant rise in the number of cases of respiratory diseases. This could be in terms of interstitial lung disease, could be in terms of lung cancer, in terms of respiratory infections," Sharma said.

"Even now what we're seeing is that minor viral infections are turning into very severe kind of illnesses requiring hospitalisation, ICU care and are even resulting in mortality," he added.

Extrapolating the findings of his study, Christopher noted that in the long run, these patients might end up with lungs that function less than optimally.

"The impact on their lung function may improve for up to one year, but some patients may have to live with scared lungs all their lives. If the impairment is relatively smaller, they will carry on with normal activities of life but it may limit their exercise capacity. If it is severe it may become an impediment on a daily basis straight away and a few may be oxygen dependent," he added.

Addressing these factors requires a multi-faceted approach, including improving healthcare access, reducing pollution levels, and implementing targeted interventions for at-risk populations, the doctors said.

Nangia said the implications of the study reveal potential long-term health challenges for Indians who have recovered from COVID, including lung function impairment and lingering symptoms.

"This suggests a need for comprehensive post-recovery care and monitoring to address these issues," he explained.

How does one decrease the risk of disease?

Regular exercise and yoga, Nangia said.

Appropriate vaccinations may reduce lung infections and thus offer protection, Avoiding air pollution outside can help, he added.

  • Published On Feb 27, 2024 at 12:36 PM IST

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Lingering Cough After A Cold? Expert Explains Reasons For Coughing And What You Can Do About It

Are you still troubled with coughing even after weeks of getting over a cold? The common cold often has a lasting impact on our respiratory health, with persistent coughs lingering even after the initial symptoms have subsided. We spoke to our expert Dr Piyush Mishra, District Immunisation Officer, North East Delhi, who sheds light on the reasons behind the phenomenon of a lingering cough and offers guidance on managing this post-cold concern.

Understanding the Phenomenon

coughing

Dr Mishra explained, “While the cold virus itself may be defeated by the immune system, the respiratory tract can remain sensitive and inflamed. This inflammation triggers the body's natural defence mechanism, leading to a lingering cough that persists even after the initial illness has passed.”

According to StatPearls, a cough is considered acute if it has persisted for less than three weeks. A cough is classified as subacute if it lasts for 3-8 weeks. Similarly, a cough is classified as chronic if it persists for longer than eight weeks.

A cough that persists after an infection is likely a result of increased sensitivity of cough receptors and temporary bronchial hyperresponsiveness as the body recovers from a severe pulmonary infection. This sensitivity is closely associated with the epithelial damage caused by the initial illness.

Also Read: Do Not Ignore Persistent Cough, It May Be A Sign Of Lung Cancer

Factors Contributing to a Lingering Cough

cold-infection

The respiratory tract's sensitivity is often a result of the body's response to the initial viral infection. Dr Mishra underscores the importance of understanding that the cough is not necessarily an indication of a persistent infection but rather a part of the body's healing process. However, it's crucial to differentiate between a normal post-cold cough and potential complications.

According to a 2006 study, approximately one in four individuals who contract an upper respiratory infection encounter post-infectious coughs, which are a common form of persistent cough.

nasal-drip

Individuals experiencing a lingering cough should consider the following factors, as listed by the expert:

  • Post-Nasal Drip: Post-nasal drip, where mucus drips down the back of the throat, can contribute to persistent coughing. Hence, staying hydrated and using saline nasal sprays may help alleviate this symptom.
  • Reactive Airways: The respiratory tract's reactivity may persist, leading to coughing triggered by irritants, such as smoke or strong odours. Avoiding such triggers and maintaining a well-ventilated environment can be beneficial.
  • Secondary Infections: In some cases, a lingering cough may indicate a secondary bacterial infection. If the cough is accompanied by symptoms, such as fever, chest pain, or coloured phlegm, seeking medical advice is advisable.

Managing Post-Cold Symptoms

Dr Mishra emphasises that patience is key when dealing with a post-cold cough. He added, “Hydration, rest, and maintaining a healthy lifestyle can support the body's recovery. However, individuals should be vigilant and consult a healthcare professional if the cough persists, worsens, or is accompanied by concerning symptoms.”

According to Harvard Health Publishing, after the onset of the cough, it typically persists for a duration of four to eight weeks. It's advisable to refrain from inducing a cough whenever feasible, as doing so can exacerbate airway irritation and impede the healing process. When you sense the urge to cough, consider using throat lozenges or increasing fluid intake to reduce the frequency of coughing episodes.

[Disclaimer: This article contains information provided by an expert and is for informational purposes only. Hence, we advise you to consult your expert if you have any health issues to get the necessary treatment.]

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What is secondhand and thirdhand smoke?

Secondhand smoke is a mixture of the smoke given off by the burning ends of tobacco products, such as cigarettes, cigars or pipes along with the smoke exhaled by the user to bystanders involuntarily. When you breathe in secondhand smoke, you take in the nicotine and toxic chemicals the same way that people who smoke do. There is no safe level of exposure to secondhand smoke.

Research has shown that even brief exposure can cause immediate harm. Secondhand smoke exposure has caused an estimated 41,000 deaths each year in the U.S. among adults who do not smoke. Research has also discovered that the vapor products such as e-cigarettes have secondhand emissions known as an aerosol that can be exhaled from the device can contain potentially harmful substances breathed in by the user and bystander.

Thirdhand smoke consists of tobacco residue from cigarettes, cigars, and other tobacco products that are left behind after smoking. This residue is made up of chemicals such as nicotine and other cancer-causing substances that cling to walls, floors, and ceilings and are absorbed into soft surfaces such as carpets, draperies, bedding, clothes and other surfaces.

The residue also settles as dust-like particles on hard surfaces. When thirdhand smoke particles are resuspended into the air after contaminated surfaces are disturbed, they are inhaled, absorbed or ingested. These harmful substances remain at high levels long after smoking has stopped. Research shows that as thirdhand smoke ages, it becomes more toxic.

Who is exposed?

Most adults and children are exposed to secondhand smoke in common places. The home is the primary location of exposure especially if they live in multi-unit housing like an apartment building or homes connected next to one another in the same place. Even if no one in the home smokes, secondhand smoke can drift from one unit to another through doorways, hallways, stairwells, electrical lines, plumbing and ventilation systems.

Many think that they can open windows, use a fan or even that their ventilation systems will eliminate the secondhand smoke, but these systems actually help distribute the secondhand smoke throughout the building.

The other location where people are exposed are at their workplaces where smoking is allowed or in public places like bars, restaurants, and casinos. Creating separate smoking sections or using sophisticated ventilation systems do not protect people from the health impact of secondhand smoke.

Vehicles can also be another location where adults and children are exposed to secondhand smoke. Children can be regularly exposed if parents or other adults smoke in the vehicles while they are present. But even if they do not smoke in their presence the concentrations of secondhand smoke in vehicles where smoking is occurring can reach very high levels leading to smoke being absorbed into the upholstery and other surfaces inside a car resulting in thirdhand smoke exposure.

Children have increased risk of exposure to thirdhand smoke due to their tendency to put objects in their mouth and touch affected surfaces. Pets are also at risk as they groom themselves by licking their fur. If that fur is coated with smoke residue, they ingest carcinogens and toxins on top of the ones their lungs are taking in.

Thirdhand smoke can stick to your skin, hair, and clothing, and can be transferred into the environment. Something to note is that common cleaning methods such as vacuuming, wiping surfaces, and airing out rooms do not completely remove thirdhand smoke.

Let’s talk about health:

According to the Center for Disease Control, secondhand smoke contains over 7,000 chemicals and at least 70 of them are known to cause cancer. Regular exposure to secondhand smoke increases the risk of developing lung cancer, heart disease, and stroke in non-smoking adults by 20-30 percent. Even brief exposure to secondhand smoke can interfere with normal functioning of heart, blood, and vascular systems and people with chronic conditions are more likely to suffer when exposed.

Secondhand smoke exposure is especially dangerous to children because their lungs and immune systems are still developing. Studies show that children of parents who smoke get sick more often and are at an increased risk for acute respiratory infections such as pneumonia and bronchitis, middle ear disease, more frequent and severe asthma, respiratory symptoms, and slowed lung growth.

Additionally, babies exposed to secondhand smoke are at increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome. SIDS is the sudden, unexplained, unexpected death of an infant in the first year of life. It has been found that infants who die from SIDS have higher concentrations of nicotine, a major ingredient of tobacco smoke, in their lungs and higher levels of cotinine, a byproduct the body creates when it breaks down nicotine, than infants who die from other causes. The chemicals in secondhand smoke affect the brain in ways that can interfere with an infants’ breathing.

Thirdhand smoke is known to become more toxic over time. Exposure to these harmful pollutants can damage human cells and DNA and may be associated with short and long-term health problems such as asthma and cancer.

Tips to help protect yourself and your family:

• Eliminating smoking is the only way to fully protect people from secondhand and thirdhand smoke exposure. As the harms caused by these are not preventable.

• Choose smoke-free locations and businesses to frequent

• Do not smoke or let anyone smoke in your home or car

• Encourage friends and family members to quit smoking

To successfully quit tobacco use it is encouraged for people to talk to their doctor, use a counseling services and medications such as nicotine replacement therapy. Have them put a plan in place, this can include identifying their triggers and how to address them.

Making sure they have a support system in case they have setbacks and encouraging them not to give up. They are also able to use the support from the Nevada Tobacco Quitline by calling 1-800-QUIT NOW (1-800-784-8669) or text “start” or “enroll now” to 300800 for free services or go to www.nevadatobaccoquitline.com for more information.

Remember that opening windows and using fans, air conditioners, air purifiers, air fresheners, or ventilation systems cannot get rid of secondhand smoke. And smoking in another room like a bathroom or bedroom will not protect children and others from secondhand smoke.

What laws do we have in place to protect us?

On Dec. 8, 2006, the Nevada Clean Indoor Air Act officially went into effect as Nevada voters chose to protect the public from the harmful effects of secondhand smoke exposure. The passage of this measure provided substantial changes to Nevada smoking laws and protects children and adults from secondhand smoke in most indoor public places.

During the 2019 legislative session the law was updated to include electronic cigarettes, or vaping products also known as e-cigarettes. While exposure to secondhand smoke has declined in Nevada, not everyone is equally protected. The following are the only public places allowed by law to allow the use of tobacco products, electronic cigarettes, or vaping products:

• Areas of casinos where minors are prohibited

• Stand-alone bars, taverns, and saloons in which patrons under 21 years of age are prohibited

• Retail tobacco stores

• Strip clubs or brothels

• Convention floors at tobacco-related trade shows

However, these establishments or venues may choose to implement voluntary “No Smoking/No Vaping” policies.

Currently 14.8 percent of adults in Nevada smoke and 23.5 percent vape or use e-cigarettes. Nevada smoking rate for high school students is 3.4 percent but e-cigarette use is 17.5 percent, according to the 2021 Youth Risk Behavior Survey. We need to continue our efforts in reducing smoking and vaping rates and protect all Nevadans from exposure to secondhand smoke and vape emissions.

For additional resources and information about department programs and services, check out our website at www.gethealthycarsoncity.org, follow us on X formerly Twitter @CCHealthEd, “Like” us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/cchhs, follow us Instagram @gethealthycarsoncity, call us at 775-887-2190, or visit us at 900 E. Long St., in Carson City. 



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Since 2020, the average annual level of PM 10 in the city's air - a measure of large suspended particulate matter, essentially dust - has jumped by more than 50%. That year, the pandemic had struck, lockdowns shut off economic activity and there was little traffic on roads.

dust trap

Focus was on checking Covid infections, but it also presented an opportunity for a civic correction.With no possibility of traffic disruption, engineering changes, landscaping and other measures needed to check pollution could have been undertaken.
More & more dust
That was, however, not to be. From 150 g/m³ in 2020, the annual average of PM 10 rose to 187 g/m³ in 2021, 210 g/m³ in 2022 and 233 g/m³ in 2023. A brown aura that hangs over the city most of the year is its most visible manifestation. Yes, the Thar desert isn't far away and climatic factors do put the city in a dusty spot.
But the dust bowls - construction sites, unpaved roads, broken pavements, burning garbage - are local creations that drive the PM 10 average up. No amount of health warnings seem to work in triggering a civic response on a war footing from govt and the city administration.
Shortening lives
Last year, the Air Quality Life Index released by University of Chicago's Energy Policy Institute said air pollution is shortening lives in Delhi-NCR, the world's most polluted region. Meeting World Health Organisation standards on pollution would, according to the report, add 11.2 years to the life span of a person living in Gurgaon. Also last year, Medanta released a study that concluded around half of the patients diagnosed with lung cancer at its OPD over a 10-year period were non-smokers.
When we breathe in pollutants, we expose our respiratory tracts to tiny, harmful particles that irritate our airways and cause shortness of breath, coughing, wheezing, asthma episodes and chest pain. Over time, exposure to air pollution can lead to other health issues, affecting our heart, brain, skin and other organs.
"There are two basic issues with air quality in NCR - smoke and dust," said Dr Arvind Kumar, chairman of the Institute of Chest Surgery, Chest Onco-Surgery and Lung Transplantation at Medanta. "I have been seeing a lot of patients who have damaged lungs because of the air that surrounds us," he added.
Compounding effect
Air pollution, said Dr Kumar, needs to be treated as a "grave public health emergency". "Air pollution affects everyone and all age groups. Some might not know how it is affecting them because not everyone feels the drastic impacts," he said.
Dr Arunesh Kumar, senior consultant and head (pulmonology and respiratory medicine) at Paras Health, said prolonged exposure to airborne particles can "severely affect the respiratory system". "Inhalation of these particles can lead to acute or chronic inflammation of airways and aggravated symptoms in patients with existing respiratory conditions. These particles can also infiltrate the bloodstream, impacting cardiovascular health, potentially contributing to heart diseases and stroke," he said.
"Pollution affects the whole body. Its musculoskeletal symptoms include muscle pain, fatigue, cramps and irritated bowel. As a respiratory system specialist, I see a rise in cases involving sudden breathlessness, frequent coughing and flu-like symptoms and also an exacerbation of bronchial asthma and COPD episodes," said Dr Kuldeep Kumar Grover, head of critical care, CK Birla Hospital.
More people coughing
Pollution has a significant impact on the eyes as well. Dry eyes, discomfort and irritation are the most common manifestations. Since polluted air often carries a cocktail of environmental toxins, prolonged exposure to these substances can lead to accumulation of toxins in the body.
In OPDs, particularly in the winter months when smoke from farm fires add to toxic pollution, people are experiencing more prolonged coughing episodes that are often triggered by viral infections. The most vulnerable groups, according to doctors, are children and the elderly. Children because their immune and respiratory systems are still developing, putting them at risk of increased respiratory infections. And the elderly because of pre-existing health conditions that are worsened by exposure pollution.
Check construction dust
Rapidly urbanising localities and construction activity generate enormous amounts of dust. A significant portion of construction and demolition waste (C&D) can be recycled and reused but large volumes end up as debris dumps along roadsides. Construction sites need better monitoring of adherence to emission and dust control norms as well as debris management. Also, dust management from C&D activities and greening measures are needed.
Tackle at source
"Govt needs to focus on reducing pollution at source. Vehicular pollution, road dust and industrial residues releases toxic substances into the air, and it needs to be curtailed immediately. There is no quick fix to this situation. We have over the years created this issue and it can be rectified eventually by taking a series of measures," said a senior doctor.



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Imagine sending your child off to school, only for them to return with complaints of headaches, nausea, and difficulty breathing. For Areli Sanchez, this scenario is a daily reality. Her daughter, Aida, who suffers from asthma, consistently complains about the exhaust fumes from her diesel-fueled school bus. This isn't just an isolated incident; around 20 million students across the United States face similar exposure, with significant health implications. The question then arises: why, in an era increasingly aware of environmental and health issues, do diesel buses still dominate our school transportation systems, and what can be done to ensure the safety and well-being of our children?

The Health Impact of Diesel Exhaust

The dangers of diesel exhaust are well-documented. Studies have shown that long-term exposure can lead to serious health problems, including respiratory issues like asthma, and even lung cancer. A report from Newsweek highlights how diesel exhaust particles cripple our immune systems, emphasizing the risk for individuals with respiratory infections. For children like Aida, the daily commute can become a source of anxiety and physical discomfort, signaling a clear need for change. Diesel exhaust doesn't just affect those with pre-existing conditions; it poses a risk to all children, whose developing bodies are especially vulnerable to pollutants.

The Push for Electric School Buses

In response to these concerns, a growing number of parents, educators, and environmental advocates are rallying for a shift towards electric school buses. Electric buses promise a cleaner, safer ride, free from the harmful emissions of their diesel counterparts. The benefits extend beyond just the health of the students; transitioning to electric buses represents a significant step towards reducing our overall environmental impact. However, the transition is not without its challenges. High upfront costs and infrastructure updates are among the primary hurdles, but the long-term health and environmental benefits argue strongly in their favor. The move towards electric school buses isn't just an investment in cleaner technology; it's an investment in the future well-being of our children.

Voices from the Ground

Areli Sanchez's fight for cleaner transportation options for her daughter and millions of other children is gaining traction. Stories like hers bring a personal dimension to the statistics, highlighting the real-world implications of policy decisions. "Every day, I worry about Aida's health," Sanchez shares. "I know we're not the only ones. It's time for a change." This sentiment is echoed by many parents who witness the effects of diesel exhaust on their children's health. As awareness grows, the push for electric school buses becomes not just a possibility, but a necessity.

The transition to electric school buses represents a crucial step in our ongoing journey towards a healthier, more sustainable future. It's a challenge that requires the collective effort of communities, school districts, and policymakers. For the sake of our children's health and the planet, it's a challenge we must meet head-on. As we continue to advocate for cleaner transportation options, the hope is that stories like Aida's become the exception, not the norm. Together, we can turn the tide and ensure a cleaner, safer commute for the next generation.



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Asthma, cardiac drug sales peak in January, doctors blame it on poor air quality

Reports by data analytical companies IQVIA and Pharmarack suggest that asthma and cardiac drug sales peaked in January and it is credited to dangerous levels of pollution and breathing problems.

New Delhi: Reports by data analytical companies IQVIA and Pharmarack suggest that asthma and cardiac drug sales peaked in January and it is credited to dangerous levels of pollution and breathing problems. Pharmacies also reported high sales of anti-infection and gastrointestinal drugs. In December, heart health drugs were sold the most and IQVIA’s in January noted that asthma and respiratory infection drugs were sold the most.

The highest growth in sales was also noted followed by insulin, antiseptic, epilepsy drugs, and medication for bacterial infections. Among heart medications, patients were given drugs to prevent blood clots in the legs in patients who have undergone knee placement or stomach surgery or are on bed rest. These medicines saw a 20 per cent increase in sales in January.

How does pollution contribute to a spike in respiratory medication sales?

During January, doctors said there was an increase in asthma patients and this was not restricted to any particular age group. The rise was seen across all age groups, however, the infection was more severe in the elderly. As a precautionary measure, nebulisers and inhalers were prescribed to asthma patients in case of emergency. Patients were managed with an asthma action plan to give treatment at home in emergency cases. In Delhi, January was the most polluted month since 2016 with an AQI of 354.

Talk of the repercussions of pollution on health, doctors say that bad air quality not just affects the respiratory system, but also takes a toll on heart health and may even raise the risk of lung cancer and depression. More severe repercussions are likely to occur in children who are already ill. The elderly and children are more susceptible to serious health problems.

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Switching to electric vehicles by 2050 could prevent thousands of premature deaths, along with millions of asthma attacks and respiratory illnesses in children in the United States, reveals a new report.

The American Lung Association (ALA) released the report Wednesday advocating for a widespread transition to zero-emission vehicles and electricity, emphasizing the substantial health improvements for children. By 2050, this transition could prevent 2.79 million pediatric asthma attacks, alleviate numerous respiratory symptoms and save hundreds of infant lives in the U.S., the report said.

“Air pollution harms children’s health and wellbeing today, and the transportation sector is a leading source of air pollution. Vehicle emissions are also the nation’s biggest source of carbon pollution that drives climate change and associated public health harms,” Harold Wimmer, president and CEO of the American Lung Association, said in a media release on Wednesday.

Traffic is one of the biggest sources of carbon pollution in U.S., making up 28 per cent of the greenhouse emissions in the country, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

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The report comes just months after Canada outlined a roadmap to have all cars on the market produce zero emissions by 2035.

In Canada, the government says traffic-related air pollution contributes every year to 1,200 premature deaths, 210,000 asthma symptom days and 2.7 million acute respiratory symptom days. It’s also associated with the development of allergies, childhood leukemia and worsening pediatric asthma.


Click to play video: 'Pregnant women exposed to traffic pollution could lead to asthma for child'


Pregnant women exposed to traffic pollution could lead to asthma for child


The ALA report, called Boosting Health for Children: Benefits of Zero-Emission Transportation and Electricity, outlines the projected health impacts if all new passenger vehicles sold in the U.S. become zero-emission by 2035, and all new trucks follow suit by 2040. It also projects that the U.S. electric grid will be powered by clean, non-combustion renewable energy by 2035.

According to the report, the transition would not only prevent millions of pediatric asthma attacks by 2050 but also:

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  • 147,000 pediatric acute bronchitis cases
  • 2.67 million pediatric upper respiratory symptoms
  • 1.87 million pediatric lower respiratory symptoms
  • 508 infant mortality cases

A 2021 report by Health Canada estimates that air pollution contributes to 15,300 premature deaths per year in Canada. This includes an estimated 6,600 premature deaths in Ontario, 4,000 in Quebec, 1,900 in British Columbia and 1,400 in Alberta.


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Air pollution is recognized globally as a major contributor to the development of disease and premature death and represents the largest environmental risk factor to human health, the Health Canada report said. Exposure to air pollution increases the risk of premature mortality from heart disease, stroke and lung cancer.

As climate change ramps up, the ALA report points out that we can expect extreme weather events to hit harder. And with more wildfire smoke, allergens, and heatwaves in the mix, the effects on children are bound to get worse.

Why children are more susceptible to air pollution

One of the main reasons children are more susceptible to air pollution is because their bodies, especially their lungs, are still developing, the ALA said.

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The growth and development of a child’s lungs and breathing ability start in utero and continue into early adulthood, the report said. The body’s defences that help adults fight off infections are still developing in children.

The protective barrier surrounding the brain is not fully developed in young children, while their nasal passages aren’t as effective at filtering out pollutants.

The report highlighted that children breathe more rapidly than adults and inhale a greater volume of air relative to their body weight.

Additionally, they tend to spend extended periods outdoors and engage in more physical activity, resulting in increased exposure to outdoor air pollution compared to adults.

What are the health impacts on children?

The health risks for children exposed to polluted air are wide-ranging and long-lasting, the report warned.

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Breathing polluted air can lead to immediate respiratory issues such as coughing, wheezing and exacerbation of conditions like asthma. Long-term exposure can hinder lung growth and function and raise the likelihood of developing asthma. Pollution exposure in children is also linked to neurodevelopmental disorders, decreased IQ, pediatric cancers and elevated risks for chronic adult diseases like cardiovascular issues, the report said.

Air pollution is also a concern for pregnant people.


Click to play video: 'Vehicle-produced air pollution connected to childhood asthma: study'


Vehicle-produced air pollution connected to childhood asthma: study


Exposure to ozone and particle pollution during pregnancy significantly heightens the risks of premature birth, low birth weight and stillbirth, the report said.

These dangers are even more pronounced in high-risk pregnancies, such as those involving people of colour or individuals with chronic conditions like asthma. It can also cause preeclampsia and  placental damage, disrupting fetal growth and development.

Fetal health may also be impacted in several ways by environmental contaminants that have been shown to cross the placenta, the report warned.

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Canada's electric vehicle goal

The ALA report concluded that policymakers at the federal, state and local levels must focus strategies to rapidly move away from combustion technologies and toward zero-emission
technologies to best protect health today and ensure children have safe and sustainable communities in which to grow.

The U.S. has set a target for half of all new vehicles sold in the country by 2030 to be zero-emissions vehicles. In Canada, government leaders have set similar goals.

On Dec. 19, 2023, the Liberal government said that all new cars will have to be zero emissions by 2035.

The Canadian government is also requiring 20 per cent of all cars, SUVs, crossovers and light-duty pickups sold by carmakers to emit zero emissions by 2026. By 2030 60 per cent of all cars sold must be zero emissions.

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Click to play video: 'Guilbeault lays out roadmap for 2035 electric vehicle targets'


Guilbeault lays out roadmap for 2035 electric vehicle targets


The government’s strategy also states regulations are designed to bring more EVs into the market, which coupled with incentives from the federal and some provincial governments will make them more affordable for lower-income Canadians.

Environment and Climate Change Minister Steven Guilbeault said during a media conference in December that he expects EVs to reach similar prices as conventional vehicles by the late 2020s — and to become cheaper over the lifespan of a vehicle.

— With files from Global News’ Nathanial Dove



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“In the last 2 months 200 cases spread across all age groups, but mainly old age and adults with comorbidities like diabetes and heart disease.”
As a result of poor air quality, many residents in the capital are experiencing respiratory and cardiac issues. Instances of cardiac arrest, stroke, and gastric problems have risen significantly. It is crucial to refrain from going outdoors during periods of low air quality or to wear a mask as a precaution.
“With levels of particulate matter (PM) reaching hazardous levels, the impact on respiratory and cardiac health is becoming increasingly evident. There is a spike in cases of asthma, bronchitis, and other respiratory illnesses, while individuals with pre-existing heart conditions are experiencing exacerbated symptoms. The high levels of pollutants in the air can lead to inflammation in the lungs and heart, putting individuals at a higher risk for cardiovascular diseases. There has been a notable rise in the number of patients seeking medical care for a variety of health concerns, including respiratory issues like asthma, chronic coughs, colds, viral infections, and abdominal distress. This increase has also been observed in cases related to cardiac conditions. People come with signs and symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath, which are often exacerbated by pollutants. Children and the elderly population are particularly vulnerable to these effects due to weakened immune systems or respiratory function. Air pollution has been linked to cardiovascular problems such as heart attacks and strokes. Last 2 months 200 cases spread across all age groups, but mainly old age and adults with comorbidities like diabetes and heart disease.” said Dr Dixit Thakur, Pulmonologist, Apollo Spectra Delhi, Chirag Enclave.

Key symptoms of lung cancer you must pay attention to

Dr Thakur added, “ The high levels of pollutants in the air have been linked to respiratory issues such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and bronchitis, as well as an increase in cardiovascular diseases. The presence of smog can cause direct irritation to the lungs and throat, especially impacting individuals with pre-existing respiratory issues. Common issues include upper respiratory problems such as nasal congestion, coughing, wheezing, difficulty breathing, and a sore throat. Individuals may also experience chest discomfort and fever. However, the majority of these symptoms are mild and typically resolve on their own. Urgent action must be taken to address this pressing issue and improve air quality in Delhi for the well-being of its residents.”

Invest in high quality air purifiers

Investing in high-quality air purifiers equipped with HEPA filters can significantly improve indoor air quality and help combat the effects of pollution in Delhi. Limit outdoor activities during peak pollution hours, typically early morning and late evening when the pollutant levels are at their highest. Opt for indoor exercises or activities during these times to reduce exposure to toxic air pollutants and protect your respiratory health in the long run. Avoiding venturing out of the house or wearing a mask can help to keep the lungs and heart healthy,” concluded Dr Thakur.



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In a world where the air we breathe is becoming increasingly compromised, the demand for innovative solutions to respiratory disorders is on the rise. The latest report from Coherent Market Insights shines a spotlight on the lung stent industry, projecting a notable growth from $206.5 million in 2023 to a staggering $333.8 million by 2030, marking a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 7.1%. This surge is attributed to the escalating prevalence of respiratory disorders such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and lung cancer, alongside significant advancements in stent technology and an aging global population.

The Catalysts of Growth

The lung stent market is witnessing a transformative phase, fueled by several key factors. Foremost among these is the increasing prevalence of respiratory disorders, a consequence of rising pollution levels, smoking rates, and an aging population vulnerable to such diseases. Additionally, the sector is benefiting from technological advancements, including the development of drug-eluting stents and bioresorbable stents, which promise improved patient outcomes. The shift towards self-expandable stents, known for their ease of use and adaptability, further exemplifies the market's evolution. With these innovations, patients suffering from narrowed airways due to lung cancer or other diseases are finding new hope in the form of enhanced breathing assistance.

Geographical Frontiers and Market Leaders

North America is poised to lead the charge in the lung stent market, driven by a high prevalence of respiratory disorders within the region. This leadership is supported by robust healthcare infrastructure and a keen focus on research and development activities. However, the market's dynamics are not confined to North America alone; Europe and Asia-Pacific regions are also significant contributors, thanks to their growing geriatric populations and increasing healthcare expenditures. At the forefront of this market are major players such as Boston Scientific, Cook Medical, and Medtronic, companies that are not only innovating lung stent technologies but also expanding their global footprint through strategic collaborations and acquisitions.

The Future of Lung Stent Technology

As we gaze into the future of lung stents, several trends hint at the market's direction. The development of bioresorbable stents stands out as a game-changer, offering the promise of stents that naturally dissolve after healing the airways, thereby eliminating the need for removal surgery. Moreover, the dominance of tracheobronchial and metal lung stents is expected to continue, given their proven efficacy and reliability. Yet, the quest for innovation does not stop here. The lung stent market is on the brink of exploring new frontiers with the potential for personalized stent solutions tailored to individual patient needs, marking a new era in respiratory care.

In conclusion, the lung stent market is on a trajectory of remarkable growth and innovation, driven by the urgent need for effective respiratory aids amidst rising global health challenges. As technology advances and the world grapples with an aging population and increasing respiratory disorders, the demand for lung stents is set to soar, offering a beacon of hope for millions struggling to breathe freely. The path ahead is paved with opportunities for improving lives through enhanced respiratory care, underscoring the vital role of lung stents in the healthcare landscape of tomorrow.



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Imagine a world where the simple act of breathing, something most take for granted, becomes a daily struggle. For millions globally, this is not a hypothetical scenario but their reality, grappling with respiratory disorders that narrow airways and threaten life's basic necessity: air. In this arena of human health, a remarkable evolution is unfolding - the rise of the lung stent market, projected to grow from $206.5 million in 2023 to $333.8 million by 2030, marking a significant Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 7.1%. This growth narrative is not just about numbers but a testament to human ingenuity and resilience, driven by the increasing prevalence of respiratory diseases and groundbreaking advancements in lung stent technology.

The Heart of Innovation: Advancements in Lung Stent Technology

At the core of this market surge are the technological advancements that have transformed lung stents from mere palliative tools to sophisticated devices offering new hope. The development of drug-eluting stents and bioresorbable materials are pivotal, providing targeted therapy and reducing long-term complications. The spotlight shines brightly on tracheobronchial stents, designed for the intricate airway anatomy, and metal lung stents, celebrated for their durability and efficacy. These innovations underline a shift towards minimally invasive procedures, echoing the medical fraternity's commitment to enhance patient outcomes while minimizing discomfort and risk.

Riding the Wave: Market Drivers and Trends

The lung stent market's trajectory is influenced by a confluence of factors, each amplifying the other. The increasing prevalence of respiratory disorders, such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), asthma, and lung cancer, forms the bedrock of this demand surge. Coupled with the rising geriatric population, susceptible to airway obstructions, the stage is set for unprecedented market growth. However, the landscape is not without its challenges. High costs and the presence of alternative treatments pose hurdles, yet the market finds resilience in the growing preference for minimally invasive procedures and continuous technological advancements in stent designs.

Geographical Frontiers and Future Projections

North America emerges as the market's frontrunner, attributed to its high incidence of respiratory disorders and favorable reimbursement policies. This region's dominance is a beacon for other geographical areas, underscoring the importance of healthcare infrastructure and access to cutting-edge medical technologies. As the market propels forward, key players are zeroing in on product innovation and strategic collaborations to cement their positions and expand their global footprint. The focus on self-expandable stents and the significance of hospitals as major end users highlight the market's dynamic nature, adapting to the evolving needs of patients and practitioners alike.

As we look towards 2030, the lung stent market stands as a remarkable emblem of progress, charting a course where technology and human need converge. This growth story, underscored by a projected CAGR of 7.1%, is not merely about market dynamics but a reflection of our collective endeavor to enhance the quality of life. In the face of respiratory ailments, the promise of improved airway management through lung stents offers a breath of fresh hope, marking a significant stride in our journey towards better health and wellbeing.



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These days, there is a serious risk to public health due to the rising rate of cardiac arrest, particularly among young and middle-aged individuals. Anybody, regardless of age or background, can experience cardiac arrest, a sudden stoppage of heart function that frequently has catastrophic results. People can, however, take proactive actions to protect their cardiovascular well-being by being aware of the signs, implementing preventive measures, and encouraging heart-healthy activities.

Recognizing the symptoms of cardiac arrest

Since cardiac arrest frequently happens suddenly, it's critical to notice the warning signals and take immediate action.Sudden unconsciousness, respiratory cessation, and lack of pulse are common signs. In certain instances, people may feel palpitations, dizziness, shortness of breath, or chest discomfort in the seconds before cardiac arrest. Early identification of these warning indicators can greatly increase the likelihood of survival because time is of the essence in the restoration of normal cardiac function.

Prevention tips for cardiac arrest

Although age and family history are uncontrollable risk factors for cardiac arrest, there are a number of preventive steps that people can do to lower their risk:

  • Maintain a healthy lifestyle: Cardiovascular health depends on a healthy weight, a balanced diet full of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, and regular exercise. Preventing heart disease and lowering the risk of cardiac arrest also require abstaining from tobacco use and consuming alcohol in moderation.
  • Regularly check yourself: Regular screenings can help you monitor your blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar levels. Increased risk of heart disease may be indicated by elevated levels of these markers, which call for additional testing and care.
  • Learn CPR: In the event of cardiac arrest, having a basic understanding of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can be lifesaving. Take a CPR training to acquire the abilities and methods required to offer emergency care until medical assistance arrives.
  • Always stay connected: In the event of a cardiac emergency, wearable technology with heart rate monitors and automated emergency response features can notify emergency personnel and offer useful data. Keep in touch with your loved ones and let them know about any cardiac issues or underlying diseases.
  • Seek medical attention: Get medical help right away if you suffer any heart disease or cardiac arrest symptoms, such as palpitations, shortness of breath, or chest pain. Prompt intervention and therapy may prevent difficulties and enhance results.

At last, cardiac arrest is still a major public health problem, but people may take proactive efforts to protect themselves and their loved ones by being aware of the signs, implementing preventive measures, and encouraging heart-healthy habits. Through ongoing training, vigilance, and emphasis on heart health, we can collaborate to lower the risk of cardiac arrest and save lives. Never forget that taking good care of your heart now will lead to better health tomorrow.
(Author: Dr. Sameer Gupta, Senior Interventional Cardiologist, Group Director - Cardiac Cath Lab, Director - Metro Group of Hospitals, Noida)

Key symptoms of lung cancer you must pay attention to



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Stopping tobacco use can help reduce your risk of developing heart disease, stroke, lung cancer, and other serious health problems. Within a few months after you stop smoking, you may notice improved breathing, circulation, and overall energy levels.

“There are so many benefits from stopping tobacco use,” Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas Clinical Pharmacy Services Manager Jennelle Knight, PharmD, CDCES, says. “It can improve your mental health, reduce stress and increase your lifespan. We at CHC/SEK are committed to assisting all who want to take back control of their health and gain freedom from tobacco.”

CHC/SEK helps patients take the first step towards stopping tobacco use including smoking, vaping, chewing and other forms of tobacco. The health center has a team of counselors, healthcare professionals, and peer support that can provide individual counseling, group counseling, nicotine replacement therapy and other resources.

Patients are provided with the information and support they need to make an informed decision about their health. Staff help patients develop a plan that is tailored to their individual needs. CHC/SEK offers several treatment options to help you stop using tobacco products.

Even for long-term heavy tobacco-users at any age, it can increase life expectancy. Additionally, stopping can improve quality of life as it can reduce the risk of respiratory infections, gum disease, and improve sense of smell and taste.

Tobacco Cessation Medications

Utilizing FDA-approved medication in addition to counseling can more than double your chances of success.

Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) is a proven and effective way to stop using tobacco. It works by supplying the body with small doses of nicotine without the harmful chemicals found in tobacco. Nicotine is an addictive substance — tobacco contains harmful chemicals. These small doses of nicotine from NRT help reduce cravings and withdrawal symptoms associated with stopping the use of tobacco such as smoking, vaping, and chewing. NRT comes in various forms such as gum, lozenges, and patches.

There are also prescription-only treatment options available to help reduce withdrawal symptoms and cravings.

Health Benefits of Stopping Smoking

Stopping smoking can significantly reduce your risk of developing smoking-related diseases, even if you’ve smoked for many years. The health benefits start almost immediately after you stop smoking, and they continue to improve over time.

Within twenty minutes of stopping smoking, your heart rate and blood pressure drop. Within twelve hours, your carbon monoxide levels return to normal. Within two to twelve weeks, your circulation improves, and lung function increases. These improvements make it easier to exercise and breathe.

Health Benefits of Stopping Vaping

Stopping vaping can have tremendous health benefits, both in the short and long term. By stopping vaping, you are reducing the risks of lung, heart, and brain damage, improving your overall health and well-being.

Within twenty minutes of stopping vaping, your blood pressure and pulse return to typical levels, and the blood circulation throughout your body improves. Your lungs have already begun to clear out mucus and other debris that may have accumulated from vaping. Within 8-12 hours, the high levels of carbon monoxide in your blood significantly decrease, making more oxygen available quickly.

By stopping vaping, you give your body a chance to heal and recover from the damage caused by vaping. You will breathe easier, have more energy, and reduce your risk of developing chronic diseases.

Health Benefits of Stopping Chewing

Chewing tobacco is a harmful habit that can lead to serious health problems. Not only does it increase your risk of oral cancer, but it can also damage your teeth and gums, cause bad breath, and even contribute to heart disease and stroke.

Stopping chewing tobacco can have dramatic health benefits. Within just twenty minutes of stopping, your blood pressure and heart rate begin to reduce, and within a year, your risk of oral cancer decreases by half. Additionally, your sense of taste and smell will improve, and your teeth and gums will become healthier and less prone to decay.

 

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