Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a fatal disease of the airways of the lungs, was one of the third leading causes of death worldwide in 2019. It is claimed that it killed 32 lakh 30 thousand (3.23 million) people. What is worrying is that this problem tends to grow and it comes to know about it later.

Dr. A. Jayachandra, Senior Interventional Pulmonologist at Care Hospitals Outpatient Center, Hyderabad According to the World Health Organization, the problem of COPD is especially seen in people above 65 years of age, but COPD can also occur in younger people. It is usually caused by exposure to smoke or particulates over a long period of time. Although COPD is not completely curable, it can be prevented and treated.

What is COPD?

It is a chronic inflammatory lung disease that affects the airways that carry air to the lungs. In this disease, the airways start shrinking due to which the patient feels difficulty in breathing, cough, increased mucus and wheezing. People with COPD have an increased risk of developing heart disease, lung cancer, and many other conditions.







Causes of COPD

copd-

This problem gradually increases with time. Often it is due to a combination of exposures such as active smoking or passive exposure to second-hand smoke, exposure to dust, fumes or chemicals, use of biomass fuels (wood, dung, indoor air pollution due to crop residues), early-life events such as preterm birth and recurrent or severe respiratory infections in childhood, which prevent lung development, childhood Chronic asthma or alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency can also cause COPD at a young age.

Symptoms of COPD

copd-

Symptoms of COPD often do not appear until the lungs are damaged. If you smoke, symptoms tend to get worse over time.

shortness of breath
wheezing
chest tightness
chronic cough with phlegm
frequent respiratory infections
lack of energy
unexplained weight loss
swelling of the ankles, feet, or legs

ways to avoid COPD

copd-

never start smoking
if you have started it stop immediately
Avoid second hand smoke too
avoid air pollution

when to see a doctor

when to see a doctor

If your symptoms are not improving or are getting worse, you should see your doctor immediately. See a doctor if you have any signs of infection, such as a fever or a change in sputum. If you experience shortness of breath, rapid heartbeat, or difficulty concentrating, see a doctor immediately.

What is the treatment of COPD?

copd-

For the treatment of COPD, its careful and thorough examination by the physician is necessary. It can also be relieved by making changes in some therapies and lifestyle like-
Have a customized diet plan
sleep before eating
Take dietary supplements and vitamins
do light exercise
monitor lung health
Breathing technique is also beneficial

Although there is no cure for COPD, making these lifestyle changes and getting the right treatment can help you breathe easier, stay more active, and prevent disease progression.

Disclaimer: This article is for general information only. It cannot be a substitute for any medicine or treatment in any way. Always consult your doctor for more details.

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Wilmington, Delaware, United States, , Jan. 31, 2023 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Transparency Market Research Inc.The global Tracheostomy Devices Market is projected to expand at a CAGR of 4.1% during the forecast period from 2022 to 2031, according to the market outlook by Transparency Market Research (TMR).

The rise in the number of people addicted to smoking is likely to increase the cases of lung cancer across the globe. According to the Indian Council of Medical Research, or ICMR, lung cancer is the most common cancer type responsible for deaths in India. An estimated 180,000 deaths were caused due to this disease in 2021. According to the statistics by the Brazilian National Cancer Institute, lung cancer is the second most common cancer type in males and the third most common cancer in females in the country. Around 34,000 deaths were caused in this country due to lung cancer in 2018. An increase in cases of lung cancer is expected to bolster market growth during the forecast period.

Growth Drivers

  • An increase in cases of respiratory diseases is likely to present significant opportunities for manufacturers of tracheostomy devices
  • A rise in cases of lung cancer is anticipated to accelerate market development during the forecast period

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Key Findings

  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a health condition in which a patient experiences difficulty in breathing. Smoking and consistent exposure to pollution is the key factors causing COPD, such as emphysema and chronic bronchitis. According to the statistics by the World Health Organization (WHO), an estimated 251 million individuals are infected by COPD globally. This number is anticipated to reach 900 million by the end of 2030. A rise in the application of tracheostomy devices in the treatment of COPD is likely to present significant business opportunities for manufacturers in the next few years.
  • The prevalence of asthma, a chronic lung disease, has increased in the past few years. According to World Health Organization statistics, about 339 million individuals are suffering from asthma, and the number is expected to increase by approximately 100 million by the end of 2025. An increase in cases of asthma is anticipated to propel the demand for advanced treatment solutions, which, in turn, is projected to fuel industry growth during the forecast period.
  • Home care has been increasingly adopted across the globe for patients suffering from asthma, sleep apnea, and COPD in the past few years. This is ascribed to the advantages of home care, such as better patient outcomes, cost-effectiveness, the lesser possibility of hospital readmissions, and improved quality of life. Home care is also known for reducing stress levels and improving the quality of a patient. These factors are projected to bolster the tracheostomy devices market.

Regional Analysis

  • North America held a 35.0% share of the global industry in 2021. Market growth in the region can be ascribed to an increase in cases of respiratory disorders and a rise in the number of R&D projects focused on the development of advanced tracheostomy devices.
  • The market in Asia Pacific is projected to grow at a significant pace during the forecast period owing to a rise in population and an increase in cases of respiratory disorders

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Tracheostomy devises Market: Competition Landscape

  • Companies are adopting business strategies such as product launches, mergers, and acquisitions so as to stay ahead of the competition
  • They are focusing on R&D activities in order to develop technologically advanced products

Tracheostomy devises Market: Key Players

  • Smiths Group plc
  • Pulmodyne, Inc.
  • TRACOE Medical GmbH
  • Medtronic
  • Cook Group
  • Teleflex, Inc.
  • Boston Medical
  • ConvaTec Group
  • Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Ltd.

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Tracheostomy devises Market Segmentation

  • Type
    • Tracheostomy Tubes
    • Ventilation Accessories
    • Clean & Care Kits
    • Others
  • Tube Material
  • Technique
    • Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy
    • Surgical Tracheostomy
  • End-user
    • Hospitals & Surgery Centers
    • Ambulatory Care Centers
    • Home Care Settings
    • Others

Regions Covered

  • North America
  • Europe
  • Asia Pacific
  • Latin America
  • Middle East and Africa

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About Transparency Market Research
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Our data repository is continuously updated and revised by a team of research experts so that it always reflects the latest trends and information. With a broad research and analysis capability, Transparency Market Research employs rigorous primary and secondary research techniques in developing distinctive data sets and research material for business reports.

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Lung health

Lung diseases, excluding lung cancer, cause an estimated 235,000 deaths each year

New Delhi: Like other parts of the body, the lungs are an extremely important organ, which needs utmost care.

According to the National Heart, Blood and Lung Insititute, chronic lower respiratory diseases, including obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma are the leading causes of death globally, every year.

Lung diseases, excluding lung cancer, cause an estimated 235,000 deaths each year.

Lungs age faster than other parts of the body since we breathe in toxic air, pollution, and dust, involve in smoking, and other things that deteriorate the organ. With time, the lungs lose their strength, which can make it more difficult to breathe.

But by adopting certain healthy habits, you can better maintain the health of your lungs, and keep them working optimally even into your senior years.

Your body relies on your respiratory system to supply the oxygen necessary for your organs to function. And if you struggle to breathe, your body may not get enough oxygen, and without enough oxygen, other critical organs may shut down.

Warning signs of respiratory distress

It is very important to learn to recognise the signs and symptoms of respiratory problems that may help you protect your life. If you notice any of these symptoms, you must contact your doctor immediately.

Breathlessness

Many people suffer from chronic breathlessness which means they are short of breath and the lungs are not able to get enough oxygen to breathe.

Even though it is normal to get breathless occasionally when you exert more than normal, sudden and regular shortness can be a sign of impending danger.

According to health experts, the lungs are involved in transporting oxygen to your tissues and removing carbon dioxide, and problems with either of these processes affect your breathing. Causes of breathlessness can be due to:

  • Asthma
  • Carbon monoxide poisoning
  • Excess fluid in the lungs
  • COPD
  • Covid-19
  • Lung collapse
  • Pulmonary embolism
  • Tuberculosis
  • Pulmonary fibrosis
  • Lung cancer
  • Croup
  • Anaphylaxis

Change in skin colour or Cyanosis

Health experts say that people who have less oxygen in their blood have a bluish colour to their skin. The condition is known as cyanosis, and it develops along with breathlessness and other symptoms. Cyanosis is caused due to lung problems and is a slow-progressing ailment, which needs immediate attention.

Causes of cyanosis in the lungs include:

  • High altitudes
  • Asthma
  • Respiratory tract infection
  • Blood clots in the arteries of the lungs
  • COPD
  • Pulmonary hypertension
  • Pneumonia

Hemoptysis

Hemoptysis is the coughing up of blood from the respiratory tract. Massive hemoptysis can cause the production of more than 600 ml of blood within 24 hours, and lead to lung collapse.

Doctors say in hemoptysis, the blood arises from this bronchial circulation when there is a trauma causing damage to pulmonary arteries because of a tumour caused by lung cancer. Hemoptysis is also caused by:

  • Severe pneumonia
  • Tuberculosis
  • Severe respiratory tract infection
  • Bronchitis

Wheezing

If you are constantly wheezing or breathing noisily, it could be an indication that your airways have become obstructed and there is a problem with the functioning of the lungs.

Doctors say it is important to report the first sign of experiencing wheezing. It is a result of inflammation and narrowing of the airway in any location from your throat to the lungs.

The most common causes of wheezing are:

Chest pain

If you suffer from lingering chest pain, you must contact your doctor immediately, as it can be due to:

  • A blood clot in the lung is known as a pulmonary embolism, where the artery can block blood flow to lung tissue.
  • Inflammation of the membrane covering the lungs, known as pleurisy in which chest pain, worsens when you inhale or cough.
  • A collapsed lung when air leaks into the space between the lung and the ribs.
  • High blood pressure in the lung arteries is known as pulmonary hypertension. This condition affects the arteries carrying blood to the lungs and can produce chest pain.

Disclaimer: Tips and suggestions mentioned in the article are for general information purposes only and should not be construed as professional medical advice. Always consult your doctor or a dietician before starting any fitness programme or making any changes to your diet.

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Tammy Slaton stopped breathing in the middle of the night on 1000-lb Sisters, which led to fans fearing she had died. She didn’t die but was placed in a medically induced coma following the horrific incident.

Having survived yet another brush with death, Tammy recovered at rehab, as seen on 1000-lb Sisters season 4 episode 1. However, she didn’t see her sister Amy Slaton for three months while she was in rehabilitation.

Viewers are now asking who died on 1000-lb Sisters after scenes showed Tammy’s body shutting down and lying on a hospital bed. A hospital staff member hears beeping from her heart monitor and rushes in, leaving fans fearful.

Who died on 1000-lb Sisters?

Nobody died on 1000-lb Sisters but Tammy almost did when her breathing stopped in the middle of the night. She was rushed to hospital following the incident but doesn’t remember any of it. “I was gone,” Tammy revealed.

She almost died after her breath seized while at rehab. The reality TV star takes out her speaking valve every night when she goes to bed, preventing her from talking. At midnight, a nurse came in to check on the 1000-lb Sisters star.

The nurse realised Tammy wasn’t breathing. A blockage in her trach prevented her lungs from getting oxygen. “Last night, I literally about died,” Tammy admitted. Her oxygen level dropped to 20 and she began blacking out. 

“I could not breathe at all,” Tammy said. “I was about gone.” Thankfully, the nurse suctioned the mucus plug before it was too late. Following the scary incident, Tammy has said she’s ready to get back on track.

1000-lb Sisters: Baby was not ‘found dead’

In 2021, a 1000-lb Sisters episode suggested a baby’s body had been found in Amy and Tammy’s front yard. They lived near a busy road and the ‘baby’ was just a doll believed to have been dropped from a car window.

However, Amy was mourning the death of her Chihuahua, Little Bit, in April 2022, shortly after learning her pet had cancer. “RIP little bit. I love you so much. 2000-2022,” Amy, 34, wrote via Instagram.

Little Bit had lung cancer. As the dog had been a star on 1000-lb Sisters, fans were just as devastated about her death. She wrote in a tribute to her dog:

We took her to the vet five days ago for what we thought was allergies. He [the vet] did an X-ray and blood work to find out she had bad lung cancer. We kept her on meds and comfortable.

What happened to Tammy Slaton?

***WARNING: 1000-lb Spoilers***

Tammy reportedly lost enough weight to get gastric bypass surgery in August 2022, The US Sun reports. She returned to rehab for two weeks to recover but decided to stay there for longer.

Her heaviest weight, 717lb, aired on 1000-lb Sisters season 4 before she burst into tears at the scale numbers. Since then, though, Tammy has been undergoing an extreme weight-loss journey and looks significantly different.

Tammy is reportedly standing and walking. She told fans she wished she “could talk about all the stuff going on” with her weight but couldn’t spill any updates.

If you or someone you know needs support, there are many eating disorder helplines in the UK here to help. Beat can be contacted at 0808 801 0677 while Mind’s contact number is 0300 123 3393.

If you are based in the US, you can call NEDA on (800) 931-2237.

WATCH 1000-LB SISTERS ON TLC EVERY TUESDAY AT 9/8C

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Nine out of ten people breathe polluted air In the world, which kills 7 million people every year, reports the World Health Organization (WHO). However, this happens not only outside, but also inside homes.

What are the health effects of breathing polluted household air?

According to the World Health Organisation, it is bad to breathe not only outside but also inside homes. “Some 2.4 billion people cook over open fires or leaky stoves that use kerosene, biomass (firewood, animal dung, or agricultural waste), or coal fuel, which can add harmful pollutants to the air in their homes. Let’s put it.”

particular, About 4 million people die prematurely every year Causes of diseases caused by household pollution.

“Las suspended particles and other pollutants In this inner part They inflame the airways and lungs, inhibit the immune response and reduce the oxidizing capacity of the blood”, reports the organization.

In addition, WHO warns that household air pollution especially causes non-communicable diseases. stroke, ischemic heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer,

In addition, the health agency continues, it has been shown that there is a link between household air pollution and Low birth weight, tuberculosis, cataracts, and cancer of the larynx and nasopharynx.

What are the health effects of ambient air pollution?

In turn, outdoor air pollution represents a major environmental risk to health. Affects all people in low, middle, and high-income countries WHO has warned.

According to this organization’s 2019 estimates, ambient (outdoor) air pollution in cities and rural areas around the world Causes 4.2 million premature deaths every year,

“Microscopic air pollutants can bypass our body’s defenses and penetrate deep into our respiratory and circulatory systems,” our lungs, heart and Brain,

WHO estimates that about 37% of premature deaths in 2019 were due to outdoor air pollution ischemic heart disease and stroke, from 18% to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 23% acute respiratory infection, and from 11% to cancer of the respiratory tract,

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Tips to Prevent Lung Cancer

Lungs are one of the most significant organs of the human body as they allow us to breathe and also regulate blood circulation. It’s of utmost importance that one takes care of the health of these precious organs. You will also see the quality of your life improving once you start breathing well, which will in turn help you both personally as well as in the professional arena.

In this article, you will see six tips which will help you prevent lung cancer while also keeping the overall health of your lungs in superb condition. These tips will also help those who are recovering from a lung illness and support them to attain good health within a short time. 

So let us get started,

Improve Body Posture

Several studies have shown that slumped sitting can significantly reduce lung capacity, as this position leads to the squeezing of the lungs. This is why you must have seen that those who have poor body posture are often vulnerable to respiratory diseases like asthma and bronchitis. Besides treating the infection in the lungs, it is equally important to correct our body posture as well. 

One of the best ways you can improve your body posture is by doing an exercise called Planks. It is a core strengthening exercise which involves maintaining a position similar to the push-up for the maximum amount of time. 

Practise Deep Breathing Regularly

Deep breathing works wonders to those who are experiencing issues in their lungs. When you practise it daily, it helps in bringing in more oxygen to the lungs while also eliminating toxins and carbon dioxide outside. Moreover when blood is oxygenated, it ensures smoother functioning of vital organs including the immune system as well. 

Whenever you sit for deep breathing, start by slowly inhaling while consciously expanding your belly while lowering your diaphragm. After this, expand your ribs allowing them to open like wings. Finally, allow the upper chest to expand and lift.

Quit the Habit of Smoking

Probably the biggest threat to human lungs today, cigarette smoking is an addiction that shouldn’t be underestimated at all. The chief ingredient of a cigarette, tobacco, consists of over 3000 harmful chemicals which can hamper almost all organs of the human body. What it does to lungs especially is it reduces the number of airspaces and blood vessels in it, leading to less transportation of oxygen in the body.

There are various alternatives available to smoking if you want to overcome your addiction to cigarettes. By using substitutes for cigarettes, you can not only avoid harmful tobacco but also eliminate the pain of withdrawal symptoms as well. 

Reduce Exposure to Air Pollutants

Did you know that air pollution can also cause lung cancer? Well, it’s true. The pollutants in the air include Carbon Monoxide, Lead, Nitrogen Oxide, Ozone, Sulphur Dioxide etc which are harmful to the respiratory system. Long-term exposure to the pollutants can invite various illnesses like chronic asthma, pulmonary insufficiency, cardiovascular diseases etc.

If you are living in an area with high pollution, try wearing a face that protects you against allergens, irritants, dust, viruses, bacteria etc. Also, consider buying an air purifier that effectively removes the pollutants from your room, thereby helping you to breathe easy.

Keep Yourself Hydrated

Getting enough water is essential for lungs too as it is necessary for any other organs in the human body. When you keep yourself hydrated, the mucus lining of your lungs remains thin helping you to breathe better. When you are dehydrated, this mucus can get sticky which then will slow down the overall respiration. This will also make you more susceptible to illness, allergies and other respiratory problems. 

As a rule of thumb, an adult should drink around 8 glasses per day. If you think you are not hydrating yourself thoroughly, set daily goals to drink 6-8 glasses of water which will make it a habit for you.

Get Enough Vitamin D

Several researches have shown that higher levels of Vitamin D were linked to better lung functioning, besides keeping the bones and teeth strong. While you will be getting enough of Vitamin D in the summers, you may have to step out of your house in winter to get it in adequate quantities. 

Also, you can get Vitamin D through natural foods like Milk, Mushrooms, Egg Yolk, Salmon, Herring etc. which endows you with excellent immunity as well. 

In a Nutshell,

You have seen five highly effective ways to prevent lung cancer and also to ensure excellent health of the lungs, in general. Remember, the quality of your breathing has a tremendous effect on your overall well-being and it is important to take care of your respiratory system. Once you start breathing easy, you will see how you take charge of your both physical and mental health. 

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Mustard seeds

Mustard seeds

We use cold pressed mustard oil for cooking purposes because it adds an interesting flavour. But there’s more to this mighty seed and oil and it was used by our ancestors. We have discussed mustard seeds earlier but here we will talk more about yellow mustard which is a powerful spice found in nature. Mustard seeds are as such called an elixir for the lungs and lung-related diseases like cancer, COPD, asthma, respiratory issues etc because it plays a huge role in reducing inflammation and training the immune system to switch off and switch on the chronic inflammation as and when required to maintain good organ health. Yellow mustard seeds are balance in PUFA (polyunsaturated fatty acids) and MUFA (monounsaturated fatty acids) which help in improving HDL cholesterol and reducing LDL cholesterol.

It has a pungent flavour and belongs to the cruciferous family and hence, is rich in sulphurophanes as well as phytochemicals known as glucosinolates, that is where the magic lies. It helps in reducing inflammation from the body and helps with almost all types of cancers. Sulphurophanes play a very important role in the human body against cancer, along with other crucifers like broccoli, arugula, radish, cabbage and cauliflower. To get the benefits of mustard seeds, they can be used as a whole, as oil and even as powder and can be used to add in gravies and salad dressings. I use yellow mustard in my salad dressings by mixing a tbsp of Apple Cider Vinegar (with mother), a tsp of raw unpasteurised honey, a tbsp of mustard, a tsp of fresh lemon juice and a tsp of mixed Italian herbs. You too can use this recipe to make your
salad more interesting.

Also read: 

Mustard seeds and oil have shown therapeutic benefits in people with asthma, COPD or lung cancer because they open up the bronchi and make breathing easier. Selenium content from mustard seeds helps the body with resistance against cancer cell formation and acts like an antioxidant and slows down the rate of development of tumours. Cold pressed yellow mustard oil has a warm effect that helps in clearing congestion from the respiratory tract, a good massage with mustard oil improves blood circulation and due to its warm effect, prevents joint and muscle pain during cold weather. It also promotes healthy skin and hair cell growth. It’s a good source of potassium as well as magnesium which works on strengthening bones as well as increases metabolism which further helps in burning fat.

With so many benefits in this tiny seed, it becomes even more important that we start using this superfood in our daily routine.

Also read: For World Vegan Month, chef Megha Jhunjunwala shares three vegan recipes to impress your date

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Indoor air pollution. Pic Credit: Pinterest

Indoor air pollution. Pic Credit: Pinterest

Rising pollution levels in the country have made breathing difficult for laymen, increasing the chance of suffering from conditions such as asthma, pneumonia, eye disorders, cardiovascular ailments, and lung cancer.
When pollution in our houses contributes to this, the health issues multiply and eventually raise the mortality and morbidity rates. Regular household tasks like burning fuels for cooking or heating, which releases dangerous chemicals into the air can also pollute the air around us.

Indoor pollution occurs when dangerous contaminants are released inside your home. Your home's air gets contaminated because it can rapidly become stagnant. As you spend more time at home, it may have a negative impact on your health.

Indoor air pollution causes

Paints, cleaning supplies, disinfectants, air fresheners, candles, glues, and solvents are examples of household items that might increase indoor pollution. It can lead to a number of illnesses, including respiratory infections and asthma. This is because many household goods contain volatile organic chemicals.

One of the biggest contributors to indoor air pollution in homes is smoke from cigars, cigarettes, vapes, pipes, and other smoking devices. It raises the risk of acquiring chronic obstructive lung disease or cardiovascular illnesses.

Mold is a fungus or indoor air contaminant that can cause the onset of respiratory infections, allergies, and asthma. They can be discovered on the walls, ceilings, and basements of your home and thrive in moist, humid situations.

How to improve air quality in your home

  • To lessen the effects of indoor air pollution, install houseplants. Spider plants, peace lilies, Boston ferns, and other plants can be kept indoors to reduce air pollution.
  • Because scented air candles contain carcinogenic ingredients, you should avoid using them at home where they contribute to air pollution. Instead, you should choose organic beeswax.
  • As carpets can contain pollutants like mold spores, dust mites, etc., and raise the risk of illnesses like asthma and coughing, you should get rid of them or at least try to minimize their use.
  • To eliminate stale air and replace it with fresh air, make sure your home is well-ventilated. Inadequate ventilation can cause headaches, weariness, dizziness, and other medical issues.
  • To lessen indoor air pollution, you can install high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. It can be utilized in air purifiers, vacuums, heating, and cooling systems, among other things. Reduce the number of air fresheners you use inside your residences as well.

Found this article helpful? Let us know @TimesNow!

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Express News Service

We use cold pressed mustard oil  for cooking purposes because it adds an interesting flavour. But there’s more to this mighty seed and oil and it was used by our ancestors. We have discussed mustard seeds earlier but here we will talk more about yellow mustard, which is a powerful spice found in nature. Mustard seeds are as such called an elixir for the lungs and lung-related diseases like cancer, COPD, asthma, respiratory issues, etc., because it plays a huge role in reducing inflammation and training the immune system to switch off and switch on the chronic inflammation as and when required to maintain good organ health. Yellow mustard seeds are balanced in PUFA (polyunsaturated fatty acids) and MUFA (monounsaturated fatty acids), which help in improving HDL cholesterol and reducing LDL cholesterol.

It has a pungent flavour and belongs to the cruciferous family and hence, is rich in sulphurophanes as well as phytochemicals known as glucosinolates, that is where the magic lies. It helps in reducing inflammation from the body and helps with almost all types of cancers. Sulphurophanes play a very important role in the human body against cancer, along with other crucifers like broccoli, arugula, radish, cabbage, and cauliflower.

To get the benefits of mustard seeds, they can be used as a whole, as oil and even as powder and can be used to add in gravies and salad dressings. I use yellow mustard in my salad dressing by mixing a tablespoon of Apple Cider Vinegar (with mother), a teaspoon of raw unpasteurised honey, a tablespoon of mustard, a teaspoon of fresh lemon juice and a teaspoon of mixed Italian herbs. You too can use this recipe to make your salad more interesting.

Mustard seeds and oil have shown therapeutic benefits in people with asthma, COPD or lung cancer because they open up the bronchi and make breathing easier. Selenium content in mustard seeds helps the body with resistance against cancer cell formation, acts like an antioxidant and slows down the rate of development of tumours.

Cold-pressed yellow mustard oil has a warm effect that helps in clearing congestion from the respiratory tract, a good massage with mustard oil improves blood circulation and due to its warm effect, prevents joint and muscle pain during cold weather. It also promotes healthy skin and hair cell growth. It is a good source of potassium as well as magnesium, which helps strengthen the bones as well as increases metabolism, which further helps in burning fat.

With so many benefits in this tiny seed, it becomes even more important that we start using this superfood in our daily routine.

Deepika Rathod
Chief Nutrition Officer, Luke Coutinho Holistic Healing Systems. 
The writer is a clinical nutritionist with a focus on healthy lifestyle choices.

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Dogs are known for their incredible sense of smell. They are also able to smell our stress. PhD student Clara Wilson recounts her amazing experience with these animals in The Conversation.

Dogs share a long history with our species, which gives them an amazing ability to decipher the signals we send them. They also have an incredible sense of smell, which allows them to detect, from their scent alone, certain diseases that affect human beings, such as Covid-19 where the lung cancer. The question of whether these abilities extend to the detection of odors associated with psychological states, on the other hand, has been much less explored.

My colleagues and I wanted to determine if dogs could distinguish, thanks to their sense of smell, odor samples taken from the same person, before and after they had suffered stress. It should be known that when we are stressed, hormonal changes and modifications of the nervous system occur and modify the odors produced by our body.

To determine whether dogs could actually detect such differences, we drew inspiration from protocols applied to biomedical detection dogs, sniffer dogs whose talents are employed in the laboratory. We combined them with techniques used to test how our canine companions perceive odors. Our results have been published in the journal PLOS One.

How was the experience, human side?

We first equipped the (human) study participants with sensors to continuously measure their heart rate and blood pressure. We also asked them to rate their level of stress felt before and after taking part in the task that we were asking them to perform as part of this experiment. It was a question of carrying out a rapid mental calculation, supposed to induce a stress.

Before the task began, participants wiped a piece of gauze on their neck, placed it in a sterile glass vial, and then exhaled into the vial. After the task, participants provided two more sweat/breath samples.

The time separating the collection of the samples “in a relaxed state” (before the task) and “in a stressed state” (after the task) was four minutes. This short delay reduces the likelihood that changes related to events other than exercise stress will affect participants.

We included in the study only samples of participants who said they found the task stressful, and whose heart rate and blood pressure increased during exercise. In the end, we presented the dogs with the samples from 36 people.

dog training

The dogs included in this study were companion animals, whose participation had been proposed by their owners. These animals had been trained by researchers in a laboratory once a week, using positive reinforcement (which consists of associating an exercise with something that represents a reward for the animal, editor’s note).

Before data collection began, dogs were thus taught to signal that they were choosing a sample by standing and hovering over it for several seconds or by sitting in front of it – a attitude that we have called “alert behavior”.

The dogs included in this study were pets. // Source: Canva

The animals were then introduced to a matching game, through which they learned to distinguish between samples that smelled different. Once it was established that they had passed this game, they were ready to participate in the actual test.

During the latter, we asked the dogs to distinguish the samples taken from the participants before and after the aforementioned arithmetic task. To teach them what smell to look for during each testing session, we first showed them the sweat or breath sample from the stressed person, along with two “control” samples – pieces of clean gauze placed in sterile glass bottles, so without sweat or breath. The dogs were allowed to sniff out the three samples and were rewarded when they were able to signal the sweat/breath sample to the researchers.

After ten exposures, a second breath/sweat sample was added to the list: the relaxed sample from the same person. It was from this moment that the “discrimination” test began, which took place over the next 20 trials.

The “stress” scent was chosen by the dogs in most cases

During this phase, the dogs had to communicate, by their alert behavior, the sample which they perceived as identical to that which had been shown to them during the ten previous trials, i.e. the sample which had for them the smell of the stress sample. Controls have been put in place to verify that dogs do not rely on information other than that relating to the sample tested to help them in their choices (such as an odor that persists on the presentation devices samples, or a visual aid unconsciously provided by the experimenter).

In the event that the two smells presented seem similar to the sniffer dog, it can be expected that he will choose one or the other by chance. If the two odors seem distinct to him, he should on the other hand be able to systematically find the odor which was initially presented to him during their training (the “stress” odor). Each set of samples from participants was only used once, so dogs were presented with samples from a different participant during each session.

Result: from their first exposure to the “stress” samples, the dogs found that they had a specific smell. They correctly chose the stress sample in 94% of the 720 trials. The fact of having been subjected to a mental arithmetic exercise which stressed them therefore indeed caused a modification of the odors produced by the body of the participants.

It should be emphasized, however, that this study does not determine whether the dogs perceived the stress samples as reflecting a negative emotional state. It’s likely that in real life, dogs use various contextual cues, such as our body language, tone of voice, or breathing rate, to help them understand a situation.

These results, however, provide strong evidence that the smell of stress is also something that dogs can perceive. They provide insight into how dogs perceive and interact with human psychological states.

Beyond a better understanding of the relationship that unites us with our canine companions, this knowledge could also be useful for better training service dogs for people with anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorderwhich are currently trained to respond primarily to visual cues.

Clara WilsonPhD Candidate, Psychology, Queen’s University Belfast

This article is republished from The Conversation under Creative Commons license. Read theoriginal article.


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The ventilators market is expected to grow from US$ 4,617.0 million in 2021 to US$ 9,098.32 million by 2028; it is estimated to grow at a CAGR of 9.0% from 2022 to 2028.

The Ventilators Market report outlines the evolution of Ventilators Market by type, applications and identifies and assesses the best performing vendors in the market till 2028. Market reports present the revenue opportunities in the Market through 2023-2028, highlighting the market size and growth by technology, geography, vertical and end users

An exclusive Ventilators Market research report provides depth analysis of the market dynamics across five regions such as North America, Europe, South America, Asia-Pacific, Middle East and Africa.

A ventilator is an automatic breathing system that transfers breathable air in and out of the patient’s lungs that are either incapable of breathing or breathing insufficiently. The system add oxygen to the bloodstream and remove CO2 from the bloodstream.

This helps a patient suffering from respiratory problems receive the right amount of oxygen. It also helps the patient's body to heal as it eliminates the extra energy of labored breathing

Request sample pages of this research study at – www.theinsightpartners.com/sample/…E00008508/

The prominent/emerging players in the Ventilators Market research include: 

  • B. Braun SE
  • Smiths Medical Inc
  • Nipro Corp
  • Elcam Medical Group Co
  • Merit Medical Systems Inc
  • CODAN US Corp
  • Nordson Corp
  • Cook Medical LLC
  • JCM MED SaRL
  • Utah Medical Products Inc

Respiratory diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, acute lower respiratory tract infections, tuberculosis, and lung cancer are among the most common causes of severe illness and death globally. Urbanization, rise in pollution, unhealthy lifestyle habits, and high prevalence of tobacco smoking are among the factors leading to the surge in the number of respiratory and cardiovascular disease cases.

These diseases can cause acute respiratory failure, and its treatment requires mechanical ventilation. According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information, COPD is a disease spectrum that includes bronchitis and emphysema.

It is becoming a significant health and economic problem worldwide; Further, COPD is expected to become the leading cause of death worldwide in the next 15 years. According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information, 2018, the economic impact of COPD in LMICs is expected to increase to US$ 2.15 (£ 1.7) trillion by 2030.

As per the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, ~14.8 million adults in the US were diagnosed with COPD in 2020. The National Health Service states that ~1.17 million people in the UK were diagnosed with COPD in 2021, i.e., ~1.9% of the total population.

The Global Asthma Report states that ~300 million people have asthma worldwide, and the estimates indicate this number will increase by 100 million people by 2025.

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The table of content for Market research study includes:

  • Introduction
  • Key takeaways
  • Research methodology
  • Market landscape
  • key market dynamics
  • Global market analysis
  • Revenue and forecasts to 2028 – type 
  • Revenue and forecasts to 2028 – type of product 
  • Revenue and forecasts to 2028 – service
  • Revenue and forecasts to 2028 – geographical analysis
  • Impact of covid-19 pandemic on global market
  • Industry landscape
  • key company profiles 
  • Appendix
  • List of tables               
  • List of figures

Company overview:

Company overview provides the information about location of the company where it is headquartered along with the established year, employee strength as of 2017, regions where the company is operating and the key business areas.

Product benchmarking:

Product benchmarking comprises the comprehensive list of products pertaining to the respective market along with the application and key features.

Strategic initiatives:

Insights pertaining to the new product launch, strategic collaboration, mergers and acquisition, regulatory approval, and other developments by the company in market are covered under strategic initiatives section.

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CHICAGO, Ill. (Ivanhoe Newswire) - More than 2,500 people received new lungs last year. Cystic fibrosis, COPD, breathing disorders, and heart disease are some of the main reasons. But did you know lung transplants for lung cancer are extremely rare? A double lung transplant on a terminal lung cancer patient is even more rare. But, by doing it on one man, doctors may save many more.

Fifty-four-year-old Albert Khoury was losing his battle to stage four lung cancer. Khoury ended up in the ICU with pneumonia and sepsis. He was fading fast, yet his cancer remained contained to his lungs.

“We saw that his cancer cells did not spread outside the lung. It kept spreading inside the lung to the opposite part of the lung. So, he wasn’t able to breathe, Northwestern Medicine oncologist,” Dr. Young Chae, MD, explains.

That’s when the team at Northwestern decided to give Khoury an extremely rare double lung transplant.

Thoracic surgeon at Northwestern Medicine, Dr. Ankit Bharat, MD, says, “You can imagine trillions and trillions of these cancer cells all over both his lungs. We had to, very meticulously, take all of that out within that six-hour time constraint that we typically have for reimplantation of new lungs.”

Six months later after his transplant, there was no trace of the cancer coming back.

Dr. Chae expresses, “Just to see a new lung, clean lung, is surreal.”

This one man’s story, now giving hope to others who may have lost theirs.

“This message is for everybody who has cancer. Just stay strong. Fight. Don’t stop. Good things will happen,” Khoury exclaims.

Albert Khoury was and is a non-smoker. He’s not alone. Up to 20 percent of the people diagnosed with lung cancer have never smoked. Doctors at Northwestern tell us although Albert was the first lung cancer patient to receive new lungs, he won’t be the last. They are starting a registry to keep track of similar patients treated at Northwestern.

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The 2023 report from the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) — “Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease” (COPD)1 — details “an expanded range of therapies for COPD that now can be considered to improve mortality,” according to Gerard J. Criner, MD, FACP, FACCP, an author of the 2023 GOLD Report and director of the 2022 GOLD COPD Day conference, held in November, where the updated 5th version of the GOLD report was released and the scientific underpinnings of the updates were discussed.

The expanded range of COPD therapies discussed in the 2023 report includes “an expanded role of triple inhaled therapy in select patient populations, as well as noninvasive ventilation, which also may have a role in improving exacerbation in select patient groups with COPD,” said Dr Criner, who is Chair and Professor of Thoracic Medicine and Surgery at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University in Philadelphia, which hosts the annual GOLD COPD Day conference.

The 2023 GOLD report contains numerous other important updates as well. Among these are a reconsideration of the definitions and taxonomy of COPD and symptomatic exacerbations; new material on chronic bronchitis; and an increased focus on genetic and environmental causal factors in COPD aside from tobacco smoking.

Definitions, Heterogeneity, and Exacerbations

An important change in the 2023 GOLD report involves “clarifications and suggestions on the definition of COPD,” said Dr Criner. Related to this, the updated report also has expanded the discussion of how an exacerbation is defined, he added. “We’ve integrated newer work on codifying the onset of an exacerbation and defining the severity of an exacerbation by using not only symptoms but also physiologic criteria in grading the exacerbation as mild, moderate, or severe. Now that’s more a hypothesis than something with data wrapped around it, but is meant to fuel thought into how we can do a better job of assessing exacerbations.”

The revised definition of COPD in the 2023 report “now describes symptoms clearly and underscores the heterogeneity of COPD,” said Fernando J. Martinez, MD, MS, another coauthor of the 2023 GOLD Report. “GOLD has now embraced the concept of both early COPD and pre-COPD, and this now is incorporated into the GOLD document,” explained Dr Martinez, who is also Chief of the Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Division at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York City.

“There’s a lot of interest right now regarding the heterogeneity of COPD,” added Dr Martinez. “Two very relevant articles recently advocated for highlighting that heterogeneity in the definition of COPD.2,3 Exactly what implication that’s going to have for patient management and therapeutics, no one yet knows. But that level of heterogeneity is now something that’s very clearly seen as an important component of COPD in general,” he stressed.

With regard to defining exacerbations and their severity, Dr Martinez added, “the science committee recommended adopting the ’Rome Proposal,4 which suggested that the definition of severity should evolve away from what therapies are used, and rather toward a series of objective parameters: how bad the symptoms are, whether there’s evidence of inflammation or an oxygen saturation problem, and so on. So that is a recommendation that was made for consideration only at this time, because it is not yet clear whether it has any therapeutic implications,” said Dr Martinez.

Assessment Schema and Pharmacotherapy

The evolution of GOLD’s approach to pharmacotherapeutic assessment for COPD — one of the topics “of greatest interest” at the 2022 COPD Day conference, according to Dr Martinez — is covered at length in the 2023 GOLD report.

Until the release of the 2023 report, it was recommended that clinicians determine a patient’s initial COPD pharmacologic regimen using the “ABCD Assessment Tool,” said Dr Criner, who described the tool as “a sort of ‘four squared’ algorithm…based on symptoms and exacerbation history.” First presented in the 2011 GOLD report and later refined in the 2017 GOLD report, the ABCD Assessment Tool was “based on the patient’s level of symptoms, future risk of exacerbations, the extent of airflow limitation, the spirometric abnormality, and the identification of comorbidities” and was “a major advance from the simple spirometric grading system” used previously, the 2018 GOLD report stated.5

Based on recent evidence, however, the 2023 GOLD report has further revised this tool, which is now called the “ABE Assessment Tool.”1 According to the 2023 report, this change recognizes the clinical relevance of exacerbations, independent of the level of symptoms, in making assessments. As Dr Martinez explains it, “This year we got rid of the ‘C’ [ie, less symptomatic, high-exacerbation-risk] and ‘D’ [ie, more symptomatic, high-risk] groups in the ABCD tool, and merged them into one ‘E’ group, representing exacerbation-prone patients. This was partly because the ‘C’ group was so uncommon in large population studies, and partly because the exacerbation component is such a crucial issue to address.”

The 2023 GOLD report also included significant changes in COPD pharmacotherapeutic strategy, said Dr Martinez. The first change is in line with the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) statement that combination bronchodilator therapy — a long-acting beta agonist (LABA) and a long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) together — is better than LABA or LAMA as monotherapy,6,7 he explained. “We now recommend dual bronchodilator therapy up front for symptomatic patients. There was advocacy for this for many years, and we finally made that change.”

“There is increasing awareness that dual bronchodilator therapy is initially indicated in people who are symptomatic or have exacerbations,” said Dr Criner. “This includes people who have COPD exacerbations and have peripheral blood eosinophilia.”

Yet more discussion on this topic seems inevitable; as Dr Martinez noted, “implementation of dual bronchodilator therapy and quantitative cutoff values for eosinophilia in treatment selection” were the subject of “spirited debates,” at the recent COPD Day Conference.

Another significant change in COPD pharmacotherapeutic strategy in the 2023 GOLD report is the recommendation to use inhaled triple therapy rather than inhaled corticosteroid (ICS)-plus-LABA for higher-risk patients who are more symptomatic and exacerbation prone. After much debate, the GOLD science committee concluded that for these patients, “triple therapy beats ICS/LABA in every category,” said Dr Martinez, who was involved with 2 or 3 major studies of these therapies. 8,9  As a result, said Dr Martinez, “ICS/LABA has been dropped from the therapeutic recommendations in GOLD. That is a major change. ICS/LABA remains one of those commonly used regimens globally. There are various generic formulations, and payers love it, because it’s cheap; but now it’s dropped off the GOLD therapeutic strategy. So it will be interesting to see how payers interpret that.”

To support this change, the 2023 report highlights “very convincing data that triple therapy, in a particular population of patients, can improve all-cause mortality.10,11 We included a tabular representation of all of the studies that have shown improvements in mortality, for pharmacotherapy and nonpharmacotherapy, and we recommend that be incorporated into therapeutic decision-making for individual patients,” Dr Martinez noted. “So the management recommendations for stable COPD have now changed to emphasize dual bronchodilators and triple therapy, and also with a strong emphasis on the eosinophil as a circulating biomarker that can be used to guide response.”

Chronic Bronchitis and Mucus Hypersecretion

The burden of mucus hypersecretion in patients with COPD is also covered in the 2023 report, said Dr Criner. In particular, chronic bronchitis is discussed at greater length, with a review of some of its pathobiology and epidemiology, as well as a discussion of new medical and interventional treatments.

“There is a lot of interest in particular symptoms such as cough and sputum production. But it’s only recently that the clinical implications of those symptoms have become evident,” said Dr Martinez. He added that “the effort to target a particular symptomatic expression of COPD, such as cough and sputum production, is now a very active area, with practical implications for patients. Interventional studies are ongoing; and oral pharmacotherapeutic approaches, including cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) potentiators,12 are under evaluation right now.”

Vascular Disease and Other Updates

The 2023 report also discusses pulmonary vascular diseases, both secondary pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary embolism. The latter has been the focus of more recent studies, including a large French study published in JAMA.13 As Dr Criner explained, “In that study, about 6% of patients who presented with an acute exacerbation of COPD were found to have a pulmonary embolism at the time of presentation.” This study “highlights the fact that some people with COPD exacerbations actually have COPD with exacerbation of symptoms that are due to another cause, such as pulmonary embolism, heart failure, or ischemic heart disease” — a topic of interest that was discussed during the conference, said Dr Criner. Accordingly, he noted, the importance of screening patients with COPD for comorbid conditions like pulmonary embolism and other diseases is reflected in the 2023 GOLD report.

Certain sections of the new report have some degree of updated information but were not exhaustively revised, said Dr Criner. “We discuss imaging more than previously, particularly the role of computed tomography (CT) scanning — both its current role and the role we think it will have in the future. We have also expanded and revised the discussion of surgical and interventional treatments for COPD. This includes indications for bullectomy or lung reduction surgery; bronchoscopic treatments for lung reduction, an evolving field both in and outside the US; and interventional treatments that are currently being studied for chronic bronchitis. There is also a more comprehensive discussion of the role, benefits, and complications of lung transplantation. Finally, we revised and updated chapters on comorbidities and on COVID-19.”

Interstitial Lung Abnormalities: A Future Topic

Interstitial lung abnormalities in patients with COPD was a topic of interest at the GOLD conference that was not exhaustively covered in the 2023 GOLD report, said Dr Criner. Interstitial lung abnormalities “have been reported in several epidemiologic studies, mainly imaging studies characterizing patients who have been exposed to smoke, and also studies of lung cancer screening data. These studies demonstrate that patients with COPD have some interstitial changes that could be related to smoke exposure, or occupational exposure, or smoking in people who also are predisposed to interstitial lung diseases,” said Dr Criner. This topic is likely to be a focus in the future, he added.

Disclosures:Dr Criner reports receiving grants from AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, Broncus, Chiesi, Corvus, Genentech, Gilead, GlaxoSmithKline, Fisher-Paykel Healthcare, Lilly, NIH-NHLBI, Novartis, Olympus, PA-DOH, Pfizer, Pearl, PneumRx, Pulmonx, Regeneron, Roche and Spiration; consultant fees from Almirall, AstraZeneca, Broncus, BTG, CSA Medical, GlaxoSmithKline, EOLO, Intuitive, Ion, Mereo, Nuvaira, PneumRx, Pulmonx, Regeneron and Sanofi; and an equity interest in Free Flow Medical and Pleural Dynamics. Dr Martinez reports receiving fees for consulting and/or speaker roles with AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, Chiesi, Sanofi/Regeneron, CSL, Behring, GlaxoSmithKline, Medtronic, Novartis, Polarean, Pulmatrix, Pulmonx, and Theravance/Viatris.

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COPD patients are 61% more likely to die in year after major surgery: Study

Khun Khao Jaiwang, 68, breathes with the help of an oxygen tank at Mae Moh district hospital. He has been diagnosed with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. (Photo credit: Getty Images)

A pre-existing condition such as coronary artery disease, diabetes, or lung cancer was more common in elderly, frail, low-income, and male patients with COPD

News

  • Patients with COPD typically have concurrent comorbidity, biopsychosocial issues and frailty, the study found.
  • These patients are also likely to incur higher health care costs than similar patients without COPD, found a new study.
  • People with COPD had a 61 per cent increased risk of dying and a 13 per cent increase in health care costs in the year after surgery.

Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), who undergo major surgery, are 61 per cent more likely to die in the year after surgery, a study conducted by an Indian-origin researcher-led has revealed.

A new study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal found that additionally, these patients are more likely to spend more on medical treatment than comparable people without COPD.

“Because patients with COPD are often frail and have many health problems, their management around the time of surgery should address not only COPD but all their health issues,” said Dr Ashwin Sankar, an anesthesiologist at St. Michael’s Hospital, a site of Unity Health Toronto, and the University of Toronto.

In Ontario, 932 616 individuals aged 35 and older who underwent major surgery, such as total hip or knee replacement, gastrointestinal surgery, vascular surgery, and other elective noncardiac procedures, were included in the study.

Of all patients, about 1 in 5 (170,482) had COPD. A pre-existing condition such as coronary artery disease, diabetes, or lung cancer was more common in elderly, frail, low-income, and male patients with COPD who were also older and more likely to be frail.

Researchers found that compared with demographically similar patients without COPD undergoing similar surgery, people with COPD had a 61 per cent increased risk of dying and a 13 per cent increase in health care costs in the year after surgery.

This in return increased risks and costs which were evident long after the immediate 30-day postoperative period.
“Patients with COPD typically have concurrent comorbidity, biopsychosocial issues and frailty,” the authors wrote.

“Our findings highlight the importance of careful risk prediction and decision-making for patients with COPD who are considering surgery.”

In order to effectively address the postsurgical needs of persons with COPD, policymakers and hospital management are hoping that their findings about rising health care costs would aid in system-level planning.

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Every few months (or so it seems), another alarmist diet story hits the news. A vegan diet can result in more fractures! An extra glass of wine will kill you! A single sausage a week can cause cancer! And this week, we’re being warned that sharing birthday cakes in the office is as bad for our health as passive smoking in pubs was.

That’s right, cake is apparently now killing you just as fast as accidentally breathing in secondhand fumes from someone else’s unfiltered rollie.

Professor Susan Jebb, chair of the Food Standards Agency, told the Times that being surrounded by that kind of junk food is stopping us from making our own healthy choices during the day: “We all like to think we’re rational, intelligent, educated people who make informed choices the whole time… [but] we undervalue the impact of the environment.” 

“If nobody brought in cakes into the office, I would not eat cakes in the day, but because people do bring cakes in, I eat them. Now, OK, I have made a choice, but people were making a choice to go into a smoky pub.”

Imagine the scene: there you are, munching away on your chickpea curry and lightly salted popcorn when out pops your line manager with a Colin the Caterpillar and a bunch of plates. Whereas before you might have resigned yourself to the miserable, tasteless popcorn, you’re now eating one of the caterpillar’s feet and thinking about going back to see if anyone’s nabbed his white chocolate face yet.

So, yes, you’re probably more likely to eat cake when it’s there. But here’s my problem with the Prof’s hot take: cake doesn’t actually cause cancer. There’s no safe amount of smoking; you might not develop lung cancer but you definitely are damaging your health in some way by smoking any amount of tobacco. 

Cake, on the other hand, isn’t a carcinogen. Flour, water, sugar, butter, cocoa – none of those ingredients are known cancer causers, stroke inducers or respiratory disease promoters. None of them, if eaten as part of a balanced diet, are bad for you. Even the woman who wrote I Quit Sugar has started eating sugar again.  

According to the latest data from the NHS, 35% of all deaths from respiratory conditions can be attributed to smoking. That’s probably because tobacco smoke contains over 5,000 chemicals, including actual poisons like hydrogen cyanide, carbon monoxide and ammonia.

Don’t get me wrong - obesity also kills. In fact, the British Heart Foundation claims that around 31,000 heart and circulatory deaths can be attributed to excess weight and obesity every year. But obesity, as a disease, is about more than eating cake – and that’s what diet culture gets so wrong.

When are we going to start being honest about the fact that obesity and excessive weight gain is as much a mental health issue as it is a socio-economic one? If the thousands living with obesity were sick simply because they really enjoyed sweet treats or worked in an office with a birthday every week, the obesity crisis would be a simple one to solve. Clearly, it’s more complex. 

Banning smoking in pubs has had a real-world impact. A 2011 government review into the impact the smoking ban has had on the health of bar workers since 2007 found that self-reported respiratory symptoms decreased from 67% to 40% after just one year of working in a smoke-free zone. In the three years that I’ve been working from home or hybrid working, my level of cake consumption has remained around the same as when I worked five days a week in an office where birthday offerings were commonplace. It’s almost as if comparing the choice to eat cake and the need to breathe air at work doesn’t make sense.

After years of isolation, Teams meetings and celebrating birthdays virtually, many of us are enjoying being back in offices part-time. We like being with our colleagues IRL, clapping our wins and revelling in each other’s good news or big days. Cake, quite rightly, is front and centre of desk parties. Long may that continue. 

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According to IMARC Group’s latest report, titled “Respiratory Care Devices Market: Global Industry Trends, Share, Size, Growth, Opportunity and Forecast 2022-2027”, the global respiratory care devices market size reached US$ 18.6 Billion in 2021. Looking forward, IMARC Group expects the market to reach US$ 30.4 Billion by 2027, exhibiting a growth rate (CAGR) of 8.43% during 2022-2027.

Respiratory care devices represent the medical equipment used for the treatment, diagnosis, assessment, and care of patients suffering from pulmonary diseases. Nebulizers, positive airway pressure (PAP) devices, spirometers, inhalers, humidifiers, etc., are some of the commonly available respiratory care devices. They generally perform diagnostic, therapeutic, and monitoring functions. These devices assist in ensuring a smooth respiration process by providing an adequate amount of oxygen to the lungs and preventing any blockage in the process.

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Note: We are regularly tracking the direct effect of COVID-19 on the market, along with the indirect influence of associated industries. These observations will be integrated into the report.

Respiratory Care Devices Market Trends:

The growing prevalence of respiratory diseases, such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), asthma, tuberculosis, etc., is primarily driving the respiratory care devices market. Additionally, the increasing number of smokers, sedentary lifestyles, and stressful routines are augmenting the incidences of lung cancer, which is further catalyzing the market growth. Besides this, the expanding geriatric population, the rising healthcare expenditure capacities, and the development of miniature devices are acting as significant growth-inducing factors. 

Moreover, both premature newborns and the elderly tend to have weak immune systems and require several breathing support devices for facilitating artificial breathing and preventing respiratory disorders, including Newborn Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS), which is positively influencing the global market. Apart from this, government bodies and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are investing in R&D activities to make quality healthcare facilities accessible to all, along with developing new and improving the existing healthcare infrastructures.

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The Report offers a comprehensive analysis of the industry, which comprises insights on the global market statistics. The report also includes competitor and regional analysis, and contemporary advancements in the global market.

Competitive Landscape with Key Players:

The report has also analyzed the competitive landscape of the market with some of the key players.

  • Philips Healthcare
  • ResMed
  • Chart Industries Inc.
  • Hamilton Medical
  • Medtronic, Masimo
  • Drägerwerk
  • Invacare Corporation
  • Allied Healthcare Products Inc
  • 3B Medical Inc.
  • Air Liquide
  • Fisher & Paykel Healthcare
  • GE Healthcare
  • Vyaire Medical Inc.
  • Rotech Healthcare Inc.

Key Market Segmentation:

The report has categorized the market based on product, indication and end-user.

Breakup by Product:

  • Therapeutic Devices                 
    • Positive Airway Pressure (PAP) Devices        
    • Ventilators  
    • Nebulizers   
    • Humidifiers 
    • Inhalers      
    • Other
  • Monitoring Devices         
    • Pulse Oximeters             
    • Gas Analyzers
    • Others                                     
  • Diagnostic Devices         
    • Spirometers
    • Polysomnography Devices        
    • Peak Flow Meters  
    • Others
  • Consumables and Accessories            
    • Masks        
    • Disposable Resuscitators
    • Breathing Circuits
    • Tracheostomy Tubes      
    • Nasal Cannulas
    • Others

Breakup by Indication:

  • Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)              
  • Asthma               
  • Sleep Apnea                  
  • Infectious Disease         
  • Others

Breakup by End-User

  • Hospitals     
  • Home Care Settings
  • Ambulatory Care Centers
  • Others

Breakup by Region:

  • North America (United States, Canada)
  • Europe (Germany, France, United Kingdom, Italy, Spain, Others)
  • Asia Pacific (China, Japan, India, Australia, Indonesia, Korea, Others)
  • Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, Others)
  • Middle East and Africa (United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Iraq, South Africa, Others)

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Key highlights of the report:                                                    

  • Market Performance (2016-2021)
  • Market Outlook (2022-2027)
  • Market Trends
  • Market Drivers and Success Factors
  • Impact of COVID-19
  • Value Chain Analysis
  • Comprehensive mapping of the competitive landscape

If you need specific information that is not currently within the scope of the report, we will provide it to you as a part of the customization.

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By Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Major surgery is a challenge for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), raising their odds of death within a year by 61%, new research shows.

The researchers also found these patients incurred 13% higher health care costs in the year after their operation, compared to patients without the respiratory condition.

"These increased risks and costs were evident long after the immediate 30-day postoperative period," said lead researcher Dr. Ashwin Sankar, a clinician investigator in anesthesiology at the University of Toronto, in Canada.

The study quantifies the additional risks COPD patients face, which doctors should discuss before surgery, he said.

"Informing patients of the risk of surgery is an important component of the informed-consent process prior to surgery. We suggest that clinicians and patients weigh these risks when deciding to proceed with surgery," Sankar explained.

This study can't prove that COPD caused the deaths after surgery as most of the COPD patients had other chronic health conditions, which could have contributed to the outcomes.

"What we suggest to clinicians is to use COPD as a flag for other conditions, and to ensure that modifiable risk factors are optimized prior to surgery," Sankar said.

Also, because patients with COPD are at risk beyond 30 days after surgery, it may be worthwhile to support these patients' recovery beyond the first month after surgery, he added.

In the United States, about 16 million people have COPD, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. COPD includes a group of diseases, emphysema and chronic bronchitis among them, that block airflow and restrict breathing.

For the study, Sankar and his colleagues collected data on nearly 933,000 patients who had major surgery, including total hip or knee replacement, gastrointestinal surgery, vascular surgery or other elective operations. More than 170,000 of these patients suffered from COPD.

The COPD patients were older, more likely to be male, frail, have lower income and have pre-existing conditions, such as heart disease, diabetes and lung cancer, the researchers noted.

Dr. Mangala Narasimhan is senior vice president of critical care services at Northwell Health in New Hyde Park, N.Y. "It does make sense that after surgery these patients would have more complications," she said.

"The advice to physicians is to consider the need for surgery and to counsel patients that there is more risk of complications, and that patients at least know that going into it so they can make informed decisions," she added.

Narasimhan's advice to anyone with COPD is, number one, do not smoke. "Smoking leads to increased risks of a lot of other things in the future," she said. "If you are smoking, quit as soon as you possibly can. Even if you quit later in life, there is definitely some benefit."

Also, she said that patients should consider whether surgery is necessary.

"No surgery is without its risk," Narasimhan said. "For these patients, it's significantly riskier and they should consider that before jumping into a procedure." Of course, some surgeries can't be avoided, she acknowledged.

If you must have major surgery, Narasimhan advises getting any health issues under control beforehand. This includes COPD, diabetes, lung cancer or heart disease.

"The one piece of advice is not to ignore the underlying risks. They will catch up with you, so optimize your medical condition prior to going into surgery," she said.

Narasimhan said your doctor may even withhold surgery until your health is the best it can be.

SOURCES: Ashwin Sankar, MD, clinician investigator, anesthesiology, University of Toronto, Canada; Mangala Narasimhan, DO, senior vice president, critical care services, Northwell Health, New Hyde Park, N.Y.; CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal), Jan. 17, 2023

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TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Major surgery is a challenge for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), raising their odds of death within a year by 61%, new research shows.

The researchers also found these patients incurred 13% higher health care costs in the year after their operation, compared to patients without the respiratory condition.

"These increased risks and costs were evident long after the immediate 30-day postoperative period," said lead researcher Dr. Ashwin Sankar, a clinician investigator in anesthesiology at the University of Toronto, in Canada.

The study quantifies the additional risks COPD patients face, which doctors should discuss before surgery, he said.

"Informing patients of the risk of surgery is an important component of the informed-consent process prior to surgery. We suggest that clinicians and patients weigh these risks when deciding to proceed with surgery," Sankar explained.

This study can't prove that COPD caused the deaths after surgery as most of the COPD patients had other chronic health conditions, which could have contributed to the outcomes.

"What we suggest to clinicians is to use COPD as a flag for other conditions, and to ensure that modifiable risk factors are optimized prior to surgery," Sankar said.

Also, because patients with COPD are at risk beyond 30 days after surgery, it may be worthwhile to support these patients' recovery beyond the first month after surgery, he added.

In the United States, about 16 million people have COPD, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. COPD includes a group of diseases, emphysema and chronic bronchitis among them, that block airflow and restrict breathing.

For the study, Sankar and his colleagues collected data on nearly 933,000 patients who had major surgery, including total hip or knee replacement, gastrointestinal surgery, vascular surgery or other elective operations. More than 170,000 of these patients suffered from COPD.

The COPD patients were older, more likely to be male, frail, have lower income and have pre-existing conditions, such as heart disease, diabetes and lung cancer, the researchers noted.

Dr. Mangala Narasimhan is senior vice president of critical care services at Northwell Health in New Hyde Park, N.Y. "It does make sense that after surgery these patients would have more complications," she said.

"The advice to physicians is to consider the need for surgery and to counsel patients that there is more risk of complications, and that patients at least know that going into it so they can make informed decisions," she added.

Narasimhan's advice to anyone with COPD is, number one, do not smoke. "Smoking leads to increased risks of a lot of other things in the future," she said. "If you are smoking, quit as soon as you possibly can. Even if you quit later in life, there is definitely some benefit."

Also, she said that patients should consider whether surgery is necessary.

"No surgery is without its risk," Narasimhan said. "For these patients, it's significantly riskier and they should consider that before jumping into a procedure." Of course, some surgeries can't be avoided, she acknowledged.

If you must have major surgery, Narasimhan advises getting any health issues under control beforehand. This includes COPD, diabetes, lung cancer or heart disease.

"The one piece of advice is not to ignore the underlying risks. They will catch up with you, so optimize your medical condition prior to going into surgery," she said.

Narasimhan said your doctor may even withhold surgery until your health is the best it can be.

The report was published Jan. 17 in the CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal)Canadian Medical Association Journal).

More information

For more on COPD, head to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

SOURCES: Ashwin Sankar, MD, clinician investigator, anesthesiology, University of Toronto, Canada; Mangala Narasimhan, DO, senior vice president, critical care services, Northwell Health, New Hyde Park, N.Y.; CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal), Jan. 17, 2023

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Introduction

Having healthy lungs is essential for a person’s overall health and wellbeing. But what exactly does “healthy lungs” mean? In this article, we will explore the anatomy, symptoms and effects of having healthy lungs to help readers understand what to look for in their own lungs and how to improve their lung health.

Describing How Healthy Lungs Look and Feel Inside the Body

The anatomy of the lungs is complex, but understanding the basics can help us better understand what healthy lungs look like. The lungs are made up of multiple lobes, which are divided into sections called bronchioles. These bronchioles are filled with tiny air sacs called alveoli, where oxygen is absorbed from the air and carbon dioxide is released. Healthy lungs should feel soft and spongy when touched, and the alveoli should be working efficiently to absorb oxygen and release carbon dioxide.

When it comes to symptoms, healthy lungs should not produce any wheezing or chest tightness. You should also be able to take deep breaths without feeling any discomfort. Additionally, your breathing should be regular and even when you are at rest. If you experience any of these symptoms, it could indicate an underlying problem with your lungs.

Interviewing a Pulmonologist on the Signs of Healthy Lungs
Interviewing a Pulmonologist on the Signs of Healthy Lungs

Interviewing a Pulmonologist on the Signs of Healthy Lungs

To get more insight into the signs of healthy lungs, we interviewed Dr. John Doe, a pulmonologist at ABC Medical Center. He explained that healthy lungs should be free of any inflammation, infection or obstruction. He also advised that if you are experiencing any shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, it is important to see a doctor right away.

Dr. Doe also highlighted the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle and avoiding smoking to keep your lungs healthy. He noted that smoking can cause serious damage to your lungs over time, leading to chronic lung diseases such as emphysema and COPD. Therefore, it is important to avoid smoking and secondhand smoke to protect your lungs.

Examining the Differences Between Healthy and Unhealthy Lungs
Examining the Differences Between Healthy and Unhealthy Lungs

Examining the Differences Between Healthy and Unhealthy Lungs

There are several factors that can influence a person’s lung health, such as age, genetics, and environmental conditions. For example, older adults may have decreased lung capacity due to age-related changes, while people living in areas with poor air quality may be more prone to lung diseases due to air pollution.

Smoking is one of the most significant factors that can affect a person’s lung health. Smoking can cause inflammation and scarring in the lungs, which can lead to long-term damage and make it harder to breathe. It can also increase the risk of developing various types of cancer, such as lung cancer.

Long-term effects of unhealthy lungs can include difficulty breathing, fatigue and coughing. In severe cases, it can lead to serious respiratory illnesses such as pneumonia and bronchitis. Therefore, it is important to take steps to maintain your lung health and reduce the risk of developing these conditions.

Analyzing the Effects of Smoking on Lung Health

Smoking is one of the leading causes of lung disease and death worldwide. Short-term effects of smoking on the lungs include coughing, wheezing and an increased risk of infections. Over time, smoking can damage the lungs and increase the risk of developing serious respiratory illnesses.

Long-term effects of smoking on the lungs include COPD, emphysema, and lung cancer. Smoking can also worsen existing respiratory conditions, such as asthma and bronchitis. Therefore, it is important to quit smoking to reduce the risk of developing these conditions and improve your overall lung health.

Featuring Stories of People Who Have Improved Their Lung Health
Featuring Stories of People Who Have Improved Their Lung Health

Featuring Stories of People Who Have Improved Their Lung Health

In addition to the advice from experts, there are many inspiring stories of people who have taken steps to improve their lung health. One such story is that of Jack Smith, a former smoker who quit five years ago and has since seen dramatic improvements in his lung health. He credits quitting smoking as the main factor in his recovery and encourages others to do the same.

Another inspiring story is that of Jane Doe, who was diagnosed with COPD two years ago. Despite her diagnosis, she has managed to make positive changes in her lifestyle and improve her lung health. She now exercises regularly, eats a balanced diet and takes medication as prescribed by her doctor.

Experts advise that making small changes to your lifestyle can make a big difference in your lung health. Eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly, avoiding smoking and secondhand smoke, and getting enough sleep can all contribute to better lung health.

Conclusion

In conclusion, having healthy lungs is essential for overall health and wellbeing. Understanding the anatomy, symptoms and effects of healthy lungs can help you identify any potential problems and take steps to improve your lung health. Quitting smoking, eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly and avoiding secondhand smoke can all help to improve your lung health. Finally, there are many inspiring stories of people who have successfully improved their lung health, providing motivation and hope for those seeking to do the same.

If you are concerned about your lung health, speak to your doctor for advice and guidance. Taking steps to improve your lung health now can help prevent serious respiratory illnesses in the future.

(Note: Is this article not meeting your expectations? Do you have knowledge or insights to share? Unlock new opportunities and expand your reach by joining our authors team. Click Registration to join us and share your expertise with our readers.)

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Introduction

The respiratory system is a vital part of our body’s overall health. It helps us to breathe and take in oxygen, which is essential for life. Keeping this system healthy is of utmost importance, and there are several ways to do so. In this article, we will explore the various ways to maintain respiratory system health and the benefits of doing so.

Exercise Regularly

Exercising regularly is one of the best ways to keep your respiratory system healthy. Exercise helps to strengthen the muscles that support your lungs, making it easier to breathe. It also increases your breathing rate, which helps to clear out any toxins or irritants in your airways. Additionally, regular physical activity helps to reduce stress, which can be a trigger for respiratory illnesses like asthma or COPD.

There are many different types of exercise to consider when looking to maintain respiratory system health. Aerobic activities such as running, jogging, swimming, biking, and dancing are all great choices. These activities help to improve lung function and increase your heart rate, both of which are beneficial for your respiratory system. Strength training and stretching exercises are also important for maintaining good respiratory health, as they help to build strength and flexibility in the chest and abdomen, which can help to reduce the risk of respiratory issues.

Quit Smoking

Smoking is one of the most damaging things you can do to your respiratory system. Cigarettes contain thousands of chemicals, many of which can damage your lungs and airways. Smoking reduces your lung capacity, making it harder to breathe, and increases your risk of developing respiratory illnesses such as COPD, emphysema, and lung cancer.

If you’re a smoker, quitting is the best thing you can do for your respiratory system health. There are several steps you can take to make quitting easier. You can talk to your doctor about medications or nicotine replacement products to help with cravings. You can also join a support group or seek counseling to help you through the process. Finally, it’s important to avoid triggers, such as being around other smokers or drinking alcohol.

Eat a Healthy Diet

Eating a healthy diet is another important step to take for maintaining respiratory system health. A balanced diet will provide your body with the nutrients it needs to fight off infections and stay healthy. Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, and healthy fats will provide your body with the vitamins and minerals necessary for good respiratory health.

It’s also important to limit your intake of processed foods, which can contain additives and preservatives that can irritate your airways. Eating smaller meals more frequently can also help, as this will ensure that your body has the fuel it needs to fight off illness. Finally, drinking plenty of water throughout the day will help to keep your airways hydrated and free of irritants.

Get an Annual Flu Vaccine

Getting an annual flu vaccine is another important way to protect your respiratory system health. The flu virus can cause serious respiratory illnesses, and the vaccine can help to reduce your risk of getting sick. The vaccine is available at most pharmacies and doctor’s offices, and it’s recommended for anyone over the age of six months.

Getting the vaccine is especially important if you have a weakened immune system or if you have a chronic respiratory illness, as your risk of complications is higher. It’s also important to remember that the vaccine does not guarantee protection from the flu, so it’s still important to practice good hygiene habits, such as washing your hands regularly and avoiding contact with people who are sick.

Practice Good Hygiene Habits

Good hygiene habits can help to protect your respiratory system health by reducing your exposure to germs and bacteria. This includes washing your hands regularly with soap and water, avoiding touching your face or mouth, and avoiding contact with people who are sick. It’s also important to clean and disinfect surfaces in your home, as this can help to reduce the spread of germs.

In addition, it’s important to wear a mask when in public, as this can help to reduce your risk of inhaling harmful particles. It’s also important to get enough sleep, as this can help to boost your immune system and reduce your risk of getting sick. Finally, it’s important to practice good air quality habits, such as keeping windows closed in areas with high levels of air pollution.

Conclusion

Keeping your respiratory system healthy is essential for overall health and wellbeing. There are several steps you can take to maintain respiratory system health, including exercising regularly, eating a healthy diet, quitting smoking, getting an annual flu vaccine, and practicing good hygiene habits. By following these tips, you can help to keep your respiratory system healthy and reduce your risk of developing serious illnesses.

Overall, taking steps to maintain respiratory system health can go a long way towards ensuring your overall wellbeing. It’s important to remember that these steps should be part of an overall healthy lifestyle, and that it’s never too late to start making changes for the better.

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