Stroke and heart attack can be prevented and not only with healthy eating and physical activity. You can get help to get the situation under control.

A method to be used in our homes, through a tool that links diseases to air filtration: here’s what we should all have at home from now on.

How to prevent stroke and heart attack-(Ladestranews.it)

Diseases such as stroke and heart attack can be connected to many causes, one of these, perhaps the least known, is COPD. This is chronic instructive pulmonary disease, a respiratory disease that affects the lungs and bronchi causing breathing difficulties. It can often accompany serious illnesses such as arrhythmias, strokes and heart attacks.

How to prevent stroke and heart attack at home

For the treatment of the air in homes, some tools and appliances are sometimes essential to have at home. We may not be aware of that there are airborne diseases, related to stroke and heart attack, which can cause serious consequences. Some diseases that cause respiratory problems are generated by plant pollens, animal allergens, but also house dust. Some tools such as the air purifier are therefore essential to make the environment as pure as possible. Today almost everyone has one, it seems like a craze like the air fryer, but it’s actually much more.

Air purifiers against stroke and heart attack

According to one study this, disease that makes cardiovascular health worrying, can be prevented through the use of air purifiers. How? By improving the air circulation, these appliances also improve health conditions.

Through the active filtering of air purifiers, pollutants and allergic substances present in the house are reduced. In this way the nose and bronchi are less in contact with inflammation of the airways. Some recent studies, carried out immediately after Covid and laundry, have shown that appliances are also essential for reducing viruses in the air, therefore they considerably prevent contact.

heart attack-stroke air purifier
Air purifiers against stroke and heart attack (ladetsranews.it)

In short, in addition to the classic method of airing the house by keeping the windows open, it is almost essential to have an air purifier. This especially if we are in a closed environment without windows or if we live in a particularly busy area. In order to have as clean an environment as possible and to contract at least possible respiratory diseases, these small household appliances can significantly change the quality of our life.

Let’s not forget that the air we breathe is our primary source of livelihood, that allows us to live and for this we must treat it with the same care with which we choose healthy foods to eat or with which we dedicate our time to physical activity.



Source link

There are certain moments in our lives when a single event becomes indelibly etched into our memory. And the significance of such moments is dictated by each of us.

Think about that for a minute. What moments are etched into your memory? Have you dealt with the loss of a parent or another family member? Have you celebrated the birth of a grandchild? What about two grandchildren? Have you walked your daughter down the aisle to marry someone who adores her as much as you do?

In the past six years, I have collected all of these memories. My mother, Betty, my stepfather, Harold, and my stepsister, Judy, all passed away. My grandchildren, Abigail and Charlotte, were born. My daughter, Heather, married Adam.

One other single event is etched into my memory on Jan. 31: On this day six years ago, at approximately 11:30 a.m., I was diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).

Recommended Reading

Main graphic for column titled

The diagnosis

The day of my diagnosis did not produce the outcome I had hoped for, but it was a confirmation of what my primary pulmonologist had suspected. My wife, Susan, was sitting at my side in the exam room at Inova Fairfax Hospital’s Advanced Lung Disease and Transplant Center in Virginia. Dr. Steven Nathan was seated facing us, while a graduate-level pulmonary fellow looked over Nathan’s shoulder.

That day presented me with a decision that only I could make. While Susan has stood with me at every step of this journey, I alone had to make the decision. It was the proverbial fork in the road: One road led to surrender, the other a more promising path.

The road to surrender required that I avoid listening to my care team, attending pulmonary rehabilitation, or seeking out others who also were on this journey. The road to promise, on the other hand, was exactly the opposite: I would become a part of my care team, attend pulmonary rehabilitation, and seek out others on this journey.

Following my own path

The variables that each of us encounter on our journeys with this disease are many. In a previous column, I wrote about the varied paths that exist. My path has worked for me. It has led me to other milestone dates that are also forever etched into my memory: The day I received the call that a donor lung was available (July 9, 2021); the day I received a bilateral lung transplant (July 10, 2021); the day of my first significant post-transplant exacerbation, pneumonia (Sept. 26, 2022); and the day of my first balloon dilation to stretch a narrowed bronchial stem (Dec. 27, 2022).

These are all dates that have helped me develop a deeper understanding of this disease, both before and after transplant.

The future

Not everyone is afforded the same choices while on their journeys. I will continue to work on living my best life. There are still milestones I want to achieve, and I’m certain there will be more moments that I haven’t yet imagined.

A milestone that’s high on my list is to hear from my donor family. I have written them several times in the 18 months since my transplant. I continue to say a prayer for my donor and their family every day.

In last week’s column, I told you that my first balloon dilation helped me breathe easier, but my pulmonary function test numbers decreased yet again. As a result, another bronchoscopy is scheduled for today, Jan. 31. I’ll arrive shortly before 11 a.m., and the procedure is set to begin at noon. I will be undergoing prep at the exact time I was diagnosed six years ago.

Every day is a new adventure. I continue looking forward to every day of this journey and each milestone moment I am presented with. It was good for me to write all of this down. While I recall each of them, they are now captured here for the newly diagnosed patient to discover. Each of these milestones has helped me to make every breath count.


Note: Pulmonary Fibrosis News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Pulmonary Fibrosis News or its parent company, BioNews, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to pulmonary fibrosis.

Source link

February is American Heart Month

JEANNE FLECKNER, 82, poses for a photo with Derek Spong, the Exercise Specialist at Health First’s Melbourne Cardiac Rehab. Health First is opening a new Viera location on February 15 inside its Pro-Health & Fitness Center at 8705 N. Wickham Road in Melbourne. (Health First image)

An exclusive exercise program helped Jeanne Fleckner have an amazing recovery. Now, it’s coming to Pro-Health & Fitness in Viera.

BREVARD COUNTY, FLORIDA – Mowing the lawn probably isn’t a big deal for most. Just don’t tell that to Jeanne Fleckner.

Last June, Fleckner was starting out in Health First’s Cardiac Rehab program following an open sternotomy aortic valve replacement. After surgery, she could only tolerate about 15 feet of walking – about 3 to 4 minutes of continuous exercise – before she’d need to take a break.

That’s not the case anymore. In early November, Fleckner joyfully celebrated her 82nd birthday with family and friends, in addition to graduating from Cardiac Rehab.

Oh, and mowing the lawn.

“This is definitely how you get better after going through something like this with your heart,” Fleckner said. “The program and the routine are what helped me recover from this.”

A Trip to the Heart Center

Earlier this year at home, Fleckner, known by her family and friends as the “Parisian Princess,” experienced an irregular heartbeat. Her neighbor quickly took her to Health First’s Holmes Regional Medical Center.

After finding out it was atrial fibrillation and her heart had a leaking valve, then going through consultation and surgery with Health First Cardiothoracic Surgeon Tamim Antaki, MD, Fleckner immediately felt comfortable with everyone she saw at the hospital’s Heart Center.

“Dr. Antaki was especially wonderful with my mom,” said her daughter, Suzanne Fleckner.

“Right after he met her, he would come into the room singing French songs to her. And she told him he was her favorite French singer during the start of surgery – that’s a special team! Everyone in the building, the Physician Assistants, the staff at Cardiac Rehab, everybody was amazing with her. We’re so grateful for this giant team.”

After successful surgery, Fleckner joined Health First’s Cardiac Rehab program. When she began the program, she could barely walk 15 feet without having to stop for a breath.

Health First Cardiothoracic Surgeon Tamim Antaki, MD. (Health First image)

A 300% Improvement

The program’s designed for people discharged from the hospital after a cardiac event. Whether surgery was involved or not, the program assists patients in aligning their lifestyles in a way that’s best for their heart.

Think exercise, diet, and psychological mind shifts. It’s offered at 611 E. Sheridan Road, Melbourne, across from Holmes Regional Medical Center. There are also plans to open a second location in Winter 2023 at Pro-Health & Fitness-Viera.

Fleckner, who was born in Brittany, France, in 1940, before moving to Paris in 1966, began Cardiac Rehab last July. She said the staff were so nice to her and would say, “Yeah, you can do it, you will get better,” in such a nice, positive way.

At the one-month mark, Fleckner said she began to feel a huge difference in the way she felt. No more losing her breath. She was walking farther than ever, and most importantly, her heart’s pumping rate improved 300 percent.

The Phases of Improvement

Darren Hill, Health First Cardiac Rehabilitation Supervisor, and his team see people of all ages with heart conditions after an illness, typically those who’ve had surgery – varying from stent placement to a heart transplant.

This life-changing team includes a medical director, supervising physicians, nurses, and exercise physiologists to help with physical and psychological ways to make it a lifestyle.

JEANNE FLECKNER joyfully celebrated her 82nd birthday with family and friends, in addition to graduating from Cardiac Rehab. Oh, and mowing the lawn.

The cardiac rehab program is made up of three phases:

■ Phase 1: It starts in the hospital as you’re recovering from a cardiac illness or surgery. As an inpatient, we put you on the path to a healthier heart by teaching you and showing you how to exercise at the right pace for you.
■ Phase 2: Once you’re out of the hospital, we’ll get you on the right track with our physician-supervised outpatient program, incorporating exercise, education, and teamwork. You’ll get access to electrocardiogram (ECG) heart-monitored exercise training, education, and counseling. And it’ll help you fully grasp your heart condition – and find ways to reduce the risk of future heart problems. Expect to spend an hour, three times a week, in the program. Customers are typically cleared for a total of 36 visits. (The program is based on the American Association of Cardio-Vascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation’s recommended model, along with Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services guidelines.)
■ Phase 3: You’ve completed Cardiac Rehab. Now, our team tailors a plan for you so that you can continue an exercise program with cardiac rehab, Pro-Health & Fitness, or in the community. We’ll even meet with the staff to coordinate an orientation program designed just for you and your cardiac needs.
So, that’s how it works. But what about the benefits? They can include:
■ Stopping or reversing damage to your heart’s blood vessels
■ Improving your strength – and getting you back to your favorite activities
■ Controlling shortness of breath, or worse, chest pain

With Cardiac Rehab, patients can improve their heart’s ejection fraction – a measure of how much-oxygenated blood is pumped in one heartbeat.

Hill said Fleckner’s condition was improved by team coaching. There, she learned about risk factors, life habit changes, nutrition, medications, and psychological factors that contribute to cardiac health.

Fleckner still maintains her workout routine three times a week at her own health club. She’s also busy cooking, meeting with friends, and enjoying her family.

For information about cardiac rehabilitation, call 321-434-8889. The new Viera location inside Pro-Health & Fitness Center at 8705 N. Wickham Road in Melbourne opens this month.

Jeanne Fleckner, above center, who was born in Brittany, France, in 1940, before moving to Paris in 1966, began Cardiac Rehab last July. She said the staff were so nice to her and would say, “Yeah, you can do it, you will get better,” in such a nice, positive way.



Source link

SPRINGFIELD — February is American Heart Month and Mercy Health knows that staying active is one of the best ways to prevent cardiovascular disease, the number one killer of both men and women.

“Exercise really is the best medicine. It can improve blood pressure, increase good cholesterol, lower your blood sugar, even help the parts of our body that are impacted negatively with stress,” explained Lisa McClure, RN supervisor of Cardiopulmonary Wellness for Mercy Health.

Mercy Health offers intense cardiac rehabilitation programs in Springfield and Urbana to help patients who are recovering from surgery or medical treatment related to a heart issue. These medically supervised programs support patients through guided exercises to help get their heart pumping, education on ways to prevent heart disease such as healthier eating habits and stress reduction counseling.

“We have an entire staff that consists of registered nurses and exercise physiologists who work with your doctor to develop a program that is unique to you and your needs,” said McClure. “Every day is a meaningful one for a heart healthy lifestyle, so I strongly recommend all patients, especially if they already have been diagnosed with heart disease, to take advantage of the available programs, be proactive and build a stronger as well as healthier heart lifestyle.”

According to the World Health Organization, 80% of all heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes can be prevented through healthier lifestyle choices. That starts at home and can involve small, simple steps.

“You can go for a walk around your neighborhood, take a hike, join a dance class, even gardening can be included in exercises that are good for your heart health,” said McClure who strongly believes in choosing an activity you enjoy. “If you like doing it, it’s something you can stick with and that’s the key. You want to choose things that are going to be sustainable. It may look different for everyone.”

When deciding on what type of activity is best, just remember the most effective heart healthy workouts do two things — increase your heart rate and cause you to breathe a little faster. If you’d like to monitor your heart rate, then start by calculating your maximum heart rate. You do this by subtracting your age from 220. For good heart health, you want to stay between 50% – 80% of that resulting number.

For example, a 40-year-old’s maximum heart rate would be 180 beats per minute. That means when working out, this person would want to maintain a heart rate between 90 and 144. Health experts recommend getting in 150 minutes of exercise a week at this pace. However, the numbers are just a guideline to help you get your heart rate up. The most important thing is to listen to your body.

“Certain medications can keep your heart rate from going up the same way it would if you aren’t taking medications. There are other factors that can change what’s considered the right intensity level for you. So, make sure to tell your doctor you want to get moving so you can talk about what the parameters should be to make sure it’s safe for you to get moving,” said McClure.

For more heart health tips and to learn about the cardiac services available at Mercy Health, visit www.mercy.com.

Source link

A never-before seen medical ailment has evolved in the world over the last few years as a result of the worldwide COVID-19 epidemic.

The condition, called “Long COVID-19,” is still so novel that intervention research is only beginning to emerge.

But La Mesa Rehab has already used all available data at hand to create a new, intensive program for those suffering from its symptoms. La Mesa Rehab will reportedly continue to refine its protocols as scientists and doctors learn more about the disease’s etiology.

Long COVID-19 is a condition defined as the continuation, recurrence of, or emergence of virus symptoms lasting more than four weeks after recovery from the initial, acute phase of the disease. Some patients’ symptoms last up to two years. As of the June 2022 report from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC,) 1 in 13 adults in the U.S. (7.5%) had Long COVID-19 symptoms.

La Mesa Rehab’s new Long COVID-19 program is offering continuity of care, working as a total network for patients with the condition. It’s a team approach, with pulmonologists, respiratory therapists, and physical therapists working together for the betterment of “long haulers,” as they’ve come to be known.

Treatment plans unique to each patient

Each patient gets a new treatment plan that differs from that of any other patient because of the widely-varying symptoms across the population, as well as symptoms that change over time within an individual.

These may include: difficulty breathing or shortness of breath, chest tightness or pain, stomach pain, headache, low stamina, fatigue or weakness. And with these sensations comes fear. One patient at the clinic described their plight “You take for granted, that you’re going to breathe…it’s such a natural thing. And when that gets taken away, it’s very scary!”

According to Tami Peavy, MBA, DPT, and founder of La Mesa Rehab, what makes their treatments so unique is that “We design individual protocols, with respiratory therapy and physical therapy at the center of the program. We identify patients’ symptoms and address them systematically and adjust their protocols accordingly.”

Respiratory and physical therapists work closely with referring physicians, together designing individually-tailored programs that reduce shortness of breath, eliminate mucus, and increase lung capacity through exercise, postural strengthening, and breathing techniques. Specialized equipment and techniques are employed in order to more quickly and effectively achieve results. A few of these treatments include: vest therapy, bubble breathing, oxygen therapy, nebulizer treatments, gas exchange analysis, and balloon therapy.

Salt chamber therapy is the newest tool in the arsenal

Salt chamber therapy involves the inhalation by patients of dry salt in the form of a mist to clear lung mucus. Saline solution is placed in a nebulizer, a device that facilitates the inhalation of the mist into the lungs. Compressed oxygen or ultrasonic power breaks up the medicinal liquid into small aerosol droplets that are inhaled from a mouthpiece. Corticosteroids or bronchodilators can be added to the nebulizer to extend the effectiveness.

This procedure is administered within a specially designed salt chamber. The process, also called halotherapy, is quite remarkable, especially considering that it’s derived from a naturally-occurring substance. Dry salt particles shrink and liquefy lung mucus plugs that obstruct airways and aggravate breathing issues. The particles accelerate mucus transport and allow for enhanced cough efficiency. Coughs are more “productive” and the lungs are relived of mucus.

Peavy, a practicing clinician and innovative thinker, came up with the novel methodology. The lofty goal, which she successfully achieved, was to enhance the benefits of pulmonary rehabilitation, and minimize patients’ reliance on prescriptions. Previously, patients would have had to undergo bronchoscopies to remove such mucus plugs.

La Mesa Rehab’s new Long COVID-19 program is based on the clinic’s experience with other lung impairments and diseases. These include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD,) emphysema, chronic bronchitis, pulmonary hypertension, pulmonary fibrosis, and bronchiectasis. Therapists share their knowledge of these conditions with each other and with those who come to them for help. Patient education is provided to help get people with Long COVID-19 back to work more quickly, which is more important than ever during these times of economic difficulty and diminished workplace numbers.

Most lung diseases are treated with drug therapies, including steroids and inhalers. However, numerous published medical reports have shown that pulmonary rehabilitation is much more effective at easing symptoms, and results in a superior quality of life. It has also been documented that improved lung function leads to greater longevity, strength, and endurance, and reduces the number of hospitalizations and readmissions.

For more information, call (619) 466-6077 or view their website at: lamesarehab.com.

The facility is located at: 8380 Center Drive, Suite E, La Mesa.

Editor’s note: This article was provided by Carol Holland Lifshitz.

Photo credit: Pixabay.com

Source link

Tanya Bunce, RN (Photo provided)

By TANYA BUNCE, RN

Following treatment for cardiovascular disease, the road to recovery starts with a cardiac rehabilitation program like the one offered at the Cayuga Center for Healthy Living. Patients with qualifying cardiac diagnoses receive medically monitored exercise and risk management education through the Cayuga Medical Center program. This program is certified by the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation.

Numerous studies show that patients who participate in a cardiac rehabilitation program feel better, live a heart-healthier lifestyle, regain strength and reduce their cardiovascular disease risks.

Source link

Models that include objective brain markers of breathlessness-expectation have the ability to predict, for the first time, which patients will experience clinically important improvements in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-linked breathlessness during pulmonary rehabilitation, according to clinical trial results published in Thorax.

Recognizing that baseline patient characteristics predictive of breathlessness remain unknown, the investigators sought to evaluate functional brain imaging markers of breathlessness-expectation as predictors of therapeutic response to pulmonary rehabilitation. Toward that end, the researchers assessed whether the brain-active agent D-cycloserine — which is known to influence expectation mechanisms — was able to modulate any predictive model.

The investigators conducted a randomized, controlled, double-blind, experimental medicine study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01985750) of D-cycloserine administered during pulmonary rehabilitation. The study evaluated 71 participants (18 female; average age, 71 years [range, 46 to 85 years]) with mild to moderate COPD who were recruited immediately prior to enrollment in a National Health Service-prescribed course of pulmonary rehabilitation. Baseline variables, including brain activity, clinical measures of pulmonary function, responses from self-report questionnaires, and drug allocation, were used to train machine-learning models to predict the outcome — which was a minimally clinically relevant change in the Dyspnea-12 (D-12) score.

Data for the current analysis were obtained at a baseline evaluation occurring at the beginning of a pulmonary rehabilitation course as well as at another evaluation performed upon completion of the pulmonary rehabilitation at 6 to 8 weeks. After the initial visit, the participants were randomly assigned to receive either oral D-cycloserine 250 mg or matched placebo. All of the participants received a single dose on 4 separate occasions 30 minutes prior to the onset of the first 4 pulmonary rehabilitation sessions. At baseline, the median Medical Research Council (MRC) DP-12 breathlessness score of the participants was 3, the median forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) was 0.55, and the median FEV1 percent predicted was 58.

Based on MRC DP-12 scores, participants were classified as “responders” (ie, those having a score of ≥3) or “nonresponders.” Overall, 41 of 71 participants in the primary dataset were classified as responders (24 in the D-cycloserine group and 17 in the placebo group), whereas 30 were nonresponders (13 in the D-cycloserine group and 17 in the placebo group). No statistically significant interaction between the responders and the nonresponders and the drug was identified with the use of χ2 analysis (P =.21).

We have shown that models including objective brain markers of breathlessness-expectation are able to predict, for the first time, which patients will have clinically important improvements in breathlessness over pulmonary rehabilitation.

Only models that included brain imaging markers of breathlessness-expectation had the ability to successfully predict improvements in D-12 score (sensitivity, 0.88; specificity, 0.77). The use of D-cycloserine was independently associated with improvement in breathlessness. Additionally, models that included questionnaires and clinical measures only did not predict outcomes (sensitivity, 0.68; specificity, 0.20).

A key limitation of the current study is the lack of validation of the model in an external dataset. Models with a large number of measures compared with events are associated with the risk for overfitting and demonstrate poor generalizability to novel datasets.

“We have shown that models including objective brain markers of breathlessness-expectation are able to predict, for the first time, which patients will have clinically important improvements in breathlessness over pulmonary rehabilitation,” the study authors concluded. “Such models could provide new insights into the mechanisms by which breathlessness may be targeted, paving the way for targeted behavioural and pharmacological interventions,” the researchers added.

Disclosure: Some of the study authors have declared affiliations with biotech, pharmaceutical, and/or device companies. Please see the original reference for a full list of authors’ disclosures. 

Source link

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a fatal disease of the airways of the lungs, was one of the third leading causes of death worldwide in 2019. It is claimed that it killed 32 lakh 30 thousand (3.23 million) people. What is worrying is that this problem tends to grow and it comes to know about it later.

Dr. A. Jayachandra, Senior Interventional Pulmonologist at Care Hospitals Outpatient Center, Hyderabad According to the World Health Organization, the problem of COPD is especially seen in people above 65 years of age, but COPD can also occur in younger people. It is usually caused by exposure to smoke or particulates over a long period of time. Although COPD is not completely curable, it can be prevented and treated.

What is COPD?

It is a chronic inflammatory lung disease that affects the airways that carry air to the lungs. In this disease, the airways start shrinking due to which the patient feels difficulty in breathing, cough, increased mucus and wheezing. People with COPD have an increased risk of developing heart disease, lung cancer, and many other conditions.







Causes of COPD

copd-

This problem gradually increases with time. Often it is due to a combination of exposures such as active smoking or passive exposure to second-hand smoke, exposure to dust, fumes or chemicals, use of biomass fuels (wood, dung, indoor air pollution due to crop residues), early-life events such as preterm birth and recurrent or severe respiratory infections in childhood, which prevent lung development, childhood Chronic asthma or alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency can also cause COPD at a young age.

Symptoms of COPD

copd-

Symptoms of COPD often do not appear until the lungs are damaged. If you smoke, symptoms tend to get worse over time.

shortness of breath
wheezing
chest tightness
chronic cough with phlegm
frequent respiratory infections
lack of energy
unexplained weight loss
swelling of the ankles, feet, or legs

ways to avoid COPD

copd-

never start smoking
if you have started it stop immediately
Avoid second hand smoke too
avoid air pollution

when to see a doctor

when to see a doctor

If your symptoms are not improving or are getting worse, you should see your doctor immediately. See a doctor if you have any signs of infection, such as a fever or a change in sputum. If you experience shortness of breath, rapid heartbeat, or difficulty concentrating, see a doctor immediately.

What is the treatment of COPD?

copd-

For the treatment of COPD, its careful and thorough examination by the physician is necessary. It can also be relieved by making changes in some therapies and lifestyle like-
Have a customized diet plan
sleep before eating
Take dietary supplements and vitamins
do light exercise
monitor lung health
Breathing technique is also beneficial

Although there is no cure for COPD, making these lifestyle changes and getting the right treatment can help you breathe easier, stay more active, and prevent disease progression.

Disclaimer: This article is for general information only. It cannot be a substitute for any medicine or treatment in any way. Always consult your doctor for more details.

Source link

For people living with a heart condition, long COVID has added yet another
concern to their list of worries.

Research suggests that you are at increased risk of blood clots, heart
attack, heart failure, inflammation of the heart, and abnormal heartbeat
following a COVID-19 infection. One in three adults that has had COVID-19
experiences long COVID symptoms that can last weeks to months after the initial
infection.

Long COVID can affect anyone who contracts the virus, but recovery can be
especially complicated for those with a condition. Led by Dr. Shahzad
Ahmed, the

Cardiac Care program at Lower Bucks Hospital

provides specialized care for patients in the Philadelphia area who have
been diagnosed with heart conditions and are experiencing long COVID. 

Common heart symptoms following a COVID-19 infection:

  1. Fatigue, feeling tired
  2. Pounding heartbeat or palpitations
  3. Trouble breathing-shortness of breath
  4. Pain in chest- chest tightness
  5. Fast heartbeat
  6. Lightheadedness or dizziness
  7. Difficulty in sleeping
  8. Blood clots

What can you for your heart care if you have long COVID?

  1. You should continue heart healthy habits like exercise
  2. Stay on your heart medications unless advised by your doctor
  3. Watch out for any new symptoms that could be attributed to COVID

How can you prevent long COVID?

Stay up to date on your vaccinations and get appropriate boosters as new
strains of COVID-19 are emerging. It will prevent you from infection. Use
proper barrier precautions and follow your local health care advisories.

If you have heart symptoms, please don’t delay your care because of fear of
contracting COVID. All healthcare settings are required to have safety
measures in place to protect you from COVID-19. Call 911 in an emergency. 

Dr. Ahmed is currently accepting new patients at BMC Cardiology Practice, located at 501
Bath Road in Bristol. For more information or to schedule an appointment,
please call 215-785-5100.

About Shahzad Ahmed, MD, FACC, FSCAI, RPVI, Interventional Cardiologist, Director of Cardiology

Limited - Dr. Shahzad Ahmed MD, FACC, FSCAI, RPVI

Dr. Shahzad Ahmed

Dr. Ahmed is Board Certified in Interventional Cardiology, Cardiovascular
Medicine, Echocardiography, Nuclear Cardiology, Vascular Ultrasound, and
Internal Medicine. He was appointed Assistant Professor of Medicine at
Drexel University College of Medicine. Under his leadership, Lower Bucks Hospital has started many
new programs, including same-day discharge after percutaneous coronary
intervention, venous and pulmonary thrombectomy, carotid stenting and
implementing the radial first approach (cardiac cath through arteries of
hand).

Source link

If you’ve been unfortunate enough to contract the COVID-19 virus, you may have noticed that your COVID cough is lingering longer than after your typical cold. And if it bothers you for long enough, you may even find yourself googling “how long does COVID cough last?”

First of all, you’re not alone. Many people who have had a COVID-19 infection report having a cough that they just can’t seem to shake, even up to a year after the virus has left their system—and, a lingering cough is something you should never ignore. But at what point does your extended cough indicate you have long COVID? After all, one in five adult COVID-19 survivors experiences long COVID symptoms and respiratory issues is one of the most common among them.

But before you worry about your lingering cough being a sign of bigger concern, we’ve spoken with infectious disease experts to help you find out when a COVID cough usually goes away, whether coughing is normal after you’ve recovered, at what point a chronic cough may indicate long COVID development, and how you may treat a cough too.

What is COVID cough and how is it different from other coughs?

Cough occurs in approximately 50% of patients with COVID-19 infection. It is usually dry and nonproductive, says Jill Howard, M.D., national director of infectious diseases at ChenMed. However, “17 to 34% of patients have persistent cough following acute COVID-19 infection.”

Many respiratory infections can also cause a post-infectious cough that lasts (typically) a few weeks after the initial infection ends, says David Cennimo, M.D., associate professor of medicine & pediatrics at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School. “This is thought to be due to hyper-responsiveness in the cough mechanism, possibly also due to some damage to the airways from the infection…This has been seen with influenza, COVID-19, and many other infections.”

When will a COVID cough usually go away?

For most people, it can take 3 to 18 months for their lungs to get back to their pre-COVID-19 baseline, says Richard Watkins, M.D., an infectious disease physician and professor of medicine at the Northeast Ohio Medical University. According to Hopkins Medicine, after a serious case of COVID-19, recovery from lung damage takes time. There’s the initial injury to the lungs, followed by scarring. Over time, the tissue heals, but it can take three months to a year or more for a person’s lung function to return to pre-COVID-19 levels.

In general, the more risk factors for severe infection, and the more severe the initial COVID-19 infection, the longer the patient experiences persistent symptoms, explains Dr. Howard.

When does chronic cough become a symptom of long COVID?

Some people have experienced a prolonged post-infectious cough after COVID-19 that has been characterized as part of the “Long-COVID” syndrome, Dr. Cennimo explains. “In some datasets, around 15% of people are coughing 3+ weeks after COVID infection. In most, this fades over time but it can take weeks to months.”

If a cough develops during acute COVID-19 infection, and lasts 3 months from the onset of illness, it is considered a manifestation of long COVID, says Dr. Howard.

How can you treat a COVID cough?

Treatment for lingering cough related to COVID is not well defined, says Dr. Cennimo. “Many people do find some comfort with cough drops, etc.”

It’s most important to make sure there is not an underlying issue causing the cough, Dr. Cennimo adds. “For instance, some COVID-19 infections do significantly damage the lungs and we can see a decrease in respiratory capacity. Some patients will also have a reactive airway disease triggered (like asthma) and their cough may be masking wheezing.” In these cases, inhalers can help.

When should you see a doctor about your COVID cough?

One red flag is the feeling of shortness of breath, says Dr. Cennimo. “If the cough lasts more than 2-3 weeks or is accompanied by shortness of breath, the person should be evaluated.” Dr. Howards adds that “if the cough is worsening rather than improving, or if it is associated with difficulty breathing, shortness of breath, fever or [phlegm] production, seek your doctor right away to further investigate.”

Dr. Watkins adds that your primary care physician “can assess your symptoms and develop a treatment plan that may include breathing exercises, antibiotics, or steroids. Referral to pulmonary rehabilitation is another option.”

Headshot of Madeleine Haase

Madeleine, Prevention’s assistant editor, has a history with health writing from her experience as an editorial assistant at WebMD, and from her personal research at university. She graduated from the University of Michigan with a degree in biopsychology, cognition, and neuroscience—and she helps strategize for success across Prevention’s social media platforms. 

Source link

If you’ve been unfortunate enough to contract the COVID-19 virus, you may have noticed that your COVID cough is lingering longer than after your typical cold. And if it bothers you for long enough, you may even find yourself googling “how long does COVID cough last?”

First of all, you’re not alone. Many people who have had a COVID-19 infection report having a cough that they just can’t seem to shake, even up to a year after the virus has left their system—and, a lingering cough is something you should never ignore. But at what point does your extended cough indicate you have long COVID? After all, one in five adult COVID-19 survivors experiences long COVID symptoms and respiratory issues is one of the most common among them.

But before you worry about your lingering cough being a sign of bigger concern, we’ve spoken with infectious disease experts to help you find out when a COVID cough usually goes away, whether coughing is normal after you’ve recovered, at what point a chronic cough may indicate long COVID development, and how you may treat a cough too.

What is COVID cough and how is it different from other coughs?

Cough occurs in approximately 50% of patients with COVID-19 infection. It is usually dry and nonproductive, says Jill Howard, M.D., national director of infectious diseases at ChenMed. However, “17 to 34% of patients have persistent cough following acute COVID-19 infection.”

Many respiratory infections can also cause a post-infectious cough that lasts (typically) a few weeks after the initial infection ends, says David Cennimo, M.D., associate professor of medicine & pediatrics at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School. “This is thought to be due to hyper-responsiveness in the cough mechanism, possibly also due to some damage to the airways from the infection…This has been seen with influenza, COVID-19, and many other infections.”

When will a COVID cough usually go away?

For most people, it can take 3 to 18 months for their lungs to get back to their pre-COVID-19 baseline, says Richard Watkins, M.D., an infectious disease physician and professor of medicine at the Northeast Ohio Medical University. According to Hopkins Medicine, after a serious case of COVID-19, recovery from lung damage takes time. There’s the initial injury to the lungs, followed by scarring. Over time, the tissue heals, but it can take three months to a year or more for a person’s lung function to return to pre-COVID-19 levels.

In general, the more risk factors for severe infection, and the more severe the initial COVID-19 infection, the longer the patient experiences persistent symptoms, explains Dr. Howard.

When does chronic cough become a symptom of long COVID?

Some people have experienced a prolonged post-infectious cough after COVID-19 that has been characterized as part of the “Long-COVID” syndrome, Dr. Cennimo explains. “In some datasets, around 15% of people are coughing 3+ weeks after COVID infection. In most, this fades over time but it can take weeks to months.”

If a cough develops during acute COVID-19 infection, and lasts 3 months from the onset of illness, it is considered a manifestation of long COVID, says Dr. Howard.

How can you treat a COVID cough?

Treatment for lingering cough related to COVID is not well defined, says Dr. Cennimo. “Many people do find some comfort with cough drops, etc.”

It’s most important to make sure there is not an underlying issue causing the cough, Dr. Cennimo adds. “For instance, some COVID-19 infections do significantly damage the lungs and we can see a decrease in respiratory capacity. Some patients will also have a reactive airway disease triggered (like asthma) and their cough may be masking wheezing.” In these cases, inhalers can help.

When should you see a doctor about your COVID cough?

One red flag is the feeling of shortness of breath, says Dr. Cennimo. “If the cough lasts more than 2-3 weeks or is accompanied by shortness of breath, the person should be evaluated.” Dr. Howards adds that “if the cough is worsening rather than improving, or if it is associated with difficulty breathing, shortness of breath, fever or [phlegm] production, seek your doctor right away to further investigate.”

Dr. Watkins adds that your primary care physician “can assess your symptoms and develop a treatment plan that may include breathing exercises, antibiotics, or steroids. Referral to pulmonary rehabilitation is another option.”

You Might Also Like

Source link






Wilmington, Delaware, United States, , Jan. 31, 2023 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Transparency Market Research Inc.The global Tracheostomy Devices Market is projected to expand at a CAGR of 4.1% during the forecast period from 2022 to 2031, according to the market outlook by Transparency Market Research (TMR).

The rise in the number of people addicted to smoking is likely to increase the cases of lung cancer across the globe. According to the Indian Council of Medical Research, or ICMR, lung cancer is the most common cancer type responsible for deaths in India. An estimated 180,000 deaths were caused due to this disease in 2021. According to the statistics by the Brazilian National Cancer Institute, lung cancer is the second most common cancer type in males and the third most common cancer in females in the country. Around 34,000 deaths were caused in this country due to lung cancer in 2018. An increase in cases of lung cancer is expected to bolster market growth during the forecast period.

Growth Drivers

  • An increase in cases of respiratory diseases is likely to present significant opportunities for manufacturers of tracheostomy devices
  • A rise in cases of lung cancer is anticipated to accelerate market development during the forecast period

Request to Sample PDF of this Strategic Report (Use Corporate Mail ID for Top Priority):
www.transparencymarketresearch.com/sample/sample.php?flag=S&rep_id=85344

Key Findings

  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a health condition in which a patient experiences difficulty in breathing. Smoking and consistent exposure to pollution is the key factors causing COPD, such as emphysema and chronic bronchitis. According to the statistics by the World Health Organization (WHO), an estimated 251 million individuals are infected by COPD globally. This number is anticipated to reach 900 million by the end of 2030. A rise in the application of tracheostomy devices in the treatment of COPD is likely to present significant business opportunities for manufacturers in the next few years.
  • The prevalence of asthma, a chronic lung disease, has increased in the past few years. According to World Health Organization statistics, about 339 million individuals are suffering from asthma, and the number is expected to increase by approximately 100 million by the end of 2025. An increase in cases of asthma is anticipated to propel the demand for advanced treatment solutions, which, in turn, is projected to fuel industry growth during the forecast period.
  • Home care has been increasingly adopted across the globe for patients suffering from asthma, sleep apnea, and COPD in the past few years. This is ascribed to the advantages of home care, such as better patient outcomes, cost-effectiveness, the lesser possibility of hospital readmissions, and improved quality of life. Home care is also known for reducing stress levels and improving the quality of a patient. These factors are projected to bolster the tracheostomy devices market.

Regional Analysis

  • North America held a 35.0% share of the global industry in 2021. Market growth in the region can be ascribed to an increase in cases of respiratory disorders and a rise in the number of R&D projects focused on the development of advanced tracheostomy devices.
  • The market in Asia Pacific is projected to grow at a significant pace during the forecast period owing to a rise in population and an increase in cases of respiratory disorders

Buy this Premium Research Report | Immediate Delivery Available –
www.transparencymarketresearch.com/checkout.php?rep_id=85344&ltype=S

Tracheostomy devises Market: Competition Landscape

  • Companies are adopting business strategies such as product launches, mergers, and acquisitions so as to stay ahead of the competition
  • They are focusing on R&D activities in order to develop technologically advanced products

Tracheostomy devises Market: Key Players

  • Smiths Group plc
  • Pulmodyne, Inc.
  • TRACOE Medical GmbH
  • Medtronic
  • Cook Group
  • Teleflex, Inc.
  • Boston Medical
  • ConvaTec Group
  • Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Ltd.

Ask for References –
www.transparencymarketresearch.com/sample/sample.php?flag=ARF&rep_id=85344

Tracheostomy devises Market Segmentation

  • Type
    • Tracheostomy Tubes
    • Ventilation Accessories
    • Clean & Care Kits
    • Others
  • Tube Material
  • Technique
    • Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy
    • Surgical Tracheostomy
  • End-user
    • Hospitals & Surgery Centers
    • Ambulatory Care Centers
    • Home Care Settings
    • Others

Regions Covered

  • North America
  • Europe
  • Asia Pacific
  • Latin America
  • Middle East and Africa

Related Research Reports

About Transparency Market Research
Transparency Market Research, a global market research company registered in Wilmington, Delaware, United States, provides custom research and consulting services. Our exclusive blend of quantitative forecasting and trends analysis provides forward-looking insights for thousands of decision-makers. Our experienced team of Analysts, Researchers, and Consultants use proprietary data sources and various tools & techniques to gather and analyses information.

Our data repository is continuously updated and revised by a team of research experts so that it always reflects the latest trends and information. With a broad research and analysis capability, Transparency Market Research employs rigorous primary and secondary research techniques in developing distinctive data sets and research material for business reports.

Contact
Nikhil Sawlani
Transparency Market Research Inc.
CORPORATE HEADQUARTER DOWNTOWN,
1000 N. West Street,
Suite 1200, Wilmington, Delaware 19801 USA
Tel: +1-518-618-1030
USA – Canada Toll-Free: 866-552-3453
Websitewww.transparencymarketresearch.com
Blogtmrblog.com
Email: [email protected]

Source link

What is pulmonary rehabilitation?

Pulmonary rehabilitation is a medically-supervised exercise and education program designed to help with difficulty breathing or if you are increasingly limited in your everyday activities due to COPD, emphysema, chronic bronchitis and other lung diseases.

Pulmonary rehabilitation is offered at the following locations:

MercyOne Des Moines Medical Center

MercyOne Dubuque Medical Center

MercyOne Elkader Medical Center

MercyOne Waterloo Medical Center

MercyOne Oelwein Medical Center

MercyOne Siouxland Medical Center

Our pulmonary rehabilitation experts understand the life-changing difficulties breathing problems can cause for you. We will help you improve your quality of life through emotional support, exercise and education.

How does pulmonary rehabilitation work?

Pulmonary rehabilitation incorporates physical reconditioning, self-care education, breathing exercises and techniques to improve your ability to carry out your daily activities. The program will also help you reduce the risks and complications of lung irritation and/or infection and promote social interaction and emotional well-being.

By attending classes, you will learn many things about your lungs. The exercise classes will help you be more active with less shortness of breath. Usually, you will be exercising both your arms and legs. The exercise classes will help you feel better and become stronger by helping you get into better shape.

Pulmonary rehabilitation will help you:

  • Alleviate shortness of breath with activity
  • Cope with feelings of fear or apprehension
  • Improve your quality of life
  • Increase exercise tolerance and strengthen breathing muscles
  • Increase your ability to function independently
  • Learn more about your disease, treatment options, coping strategies and breathing techniques
  • Maintain health behaviors
  • Recognize, treat and resist respiratory infection and flare-ups
  • Reduce and control breathing difficulties
  • Reduce exacerbations and hospitalizations

Who could benefit from pulmonary rehabilitation?

You can benefit from pulmonary rehabilitation if you have had:

  • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
    • emphysema
    • chronic bronchitis
  • cystic fibrosis (CF)
  • interstitial lung disease
    • sarcoidosis
    • pulmonary fibrosis
  • lung surgery
  • muscular dystrophy
  • and other lung diseases

Source link

Lungs are the main organ of the body’s respiratory system. When we breathe, our lungs absorb oxygen which is transported to and the all parts of our body, harmful carbon dioxide is removed from our system, keeping our body healthy and running. In recent years, due to several lifestyle and environmental changes, our respiratory health is suffering greatly, giving rise to a many acute as well as chronic and long-term lung diseases.

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, occupational lung diseases, bronchitis, and pulmonary hypertension are among the most common chronic lung diseases. Children, the elderly, and those with weak immune system are especially vulnerable to the chronic lung diseases. Globally asthma affected approximately 339 million  people, according to the World Health Organization. Even the number of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is also increasing. It has affected 384 million  people worldwide.

There are several factors contributing to the increased risk of developing chronic lung diseases. Some of them are:

  • Smoking: Smoking causes damage to the airways and the small air sacs in the lungs which can cause lung disease. People who do not smoke but are exposed to secondhand smoke inhale many of the same poisonous substances and can develop chronic lung disease.
  • Air pollution: According to the World Health Organization, air pollution is second tobacco epidemic and is responsible for 7 million  deaths worldwide each year. Exposure to harmful air pollutants not only damages the lung function and causes chronic lung diseases but also causes inflammation.
  • Burning fuel: People who are exposed to fumes from burning fuel for cooking in poorly ventilated homes are more likely to develop chronic lung diseases.
  • Genetics: People with genetic conditions are also at the risk of developing lung diseases. For example: Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency effects the lungs and can cause COPD.

Warning signs of chronic lung disease

Chronic lung diseases can be extremely dangerous to one’s health, so understanding the symptoms is critical. Though symptoms may vary in different chronic lung disease but there are certain symptoms which are commonly seen in all the patients are persistent breathlessness, cough, wheeze, chest infections, chest pain, mucus production, and fatigue.

Anybody experiencing any of the warning signs should immediately visit a doctor.

What are the preventive measures against chronic long term lung disease?

  • Eat right- Diet has a significant impact on lung health and can aid in its maintenance. To protect the lungs people should consume citrus fruits, vegetables, and antioxidant-rich foods.
  • Strengthen the lungs-People are advised to do breathing exercises because they help to improve the capacity of the lungs and increase the oxygen in the blood. All of this protects the lungs from developing chronic lung diseases.
  • Regular health checkups- As lung diseases can go unnoticed until they are severe, regular health checkups can help prevent them.
  • Quit smoking- As smoking is a major risk factor for developing chronic lung diseases. So, to protect the lungs, it is best to avoid smoking.
  • Proper ventilation- As exposure to fumes from burning cooking fuel in poorly ventilated areas increases the risk, it is critical to ensure that a place is well ventilated before burning cooking fuels.
  • Reduce exposure to outdoor pollution- Unless necessary, avoid going outside because prolonged exposure to air pollution is harmful to lung health.

Treatment options available for chronic long- term lung disease

  • Medications- A variety of medications can be used to treat the symptoms and complications of long-term lung disease. People suffering from early-stage lung diseases (COPD, pulmonary fibrosis, cystic fibrosis, and pulmonary arterial hypertension) are often prescribed long term medications daily to control and manage their symptoms, thereby preventing the progression of the disease. Combination medications, inhaled steroids and short-acting bronchodilator inhalers are some of the common medications, however they should only be taken after consulting adoctor.
  • Therapy- Along with an appropriate medical treatment plan, additional therapies may provide relief to people suffering from chronic lung disease. For example, oxygen therapy, where extra oxygen is provided to the body, can be helpful for patients with lung disease.
  • Lung transplant- Lung transplantation remains the pivotal treatment option once all the possible conservative treatments are exhausted and disease is irreversible. It involves a surgical procedure that helps replace a diseased or failing lung with a healthy one from a deceased donor. Aside from the underlying pulmonary or cardiopulmonary disease, the main selection criteria for transplant candidates are age, mobility, nutritional and muscular condition, and concurrent extrapulmonary disease.

People who have tried medications or other treatments, but whose conditions have not improved sufficiently are candidates for a lung transplant. Depending on the criteria, a lung transplantation is performed and can successfully improve the patient’s quality of life (e.g., in COPD or emphysema) and/or prolong life expectancy (e.g., in cystic fibrosis, pulmonary fibrosis, and pulmonary arterial hypertension).

The treatment protocol for each chronic lung disease varies depending on its type and spread, therefore patients are advised to work closely with doctor to determine what treatment works best for them. The best way to manage symptoms is to monitor lung disease and collaborate with the doctor.



Linkedin


Disclaimer

Views expressed above are the author's own.



END OF ARTICLE


Source link

Cystic Fibrosis Pipeline Appears Robust With 75+ Key Pharma

DelveInsight's, "Cystic Fibrosis Pipeline Insight, 2022," report provides comprehensive insights about 75+ companies and 80+ pipeline drugs in the Cystic Fibrosis pipeline landscape. It covers the Cystic Fibrosis pipeline drug profiles, including Cystic Fibrosis clinical trials and nonclinical stage products. It also covers the Cystic Fibrosis pipeline therapeutics assessment by product type, stage, route of administration, and molecule type. It further highlights the inactive pipeline products in this space.
In the Cystic Fibrosis pipeline report, detailed description of the drug is given which includes mechanism of action of the drug, clinical studies, Cystic Fibrosis NDA approvals (if any), and product development activities comprising the technology, Cystic Fibrosis collaborations, licensing, mergers and acquisition, funding, designations and other product related details.

Key takeaways from the Cystic Fibrosis Pipeline Insight Report

• DelveInsight's Cystic Fibrosis Pipeline report depicts a robust space with 75+ active players working to develop 80+ pipeline therapies for Cystic Fibrosis.

• The leading Cystic Fibrosis Companies such as Eloxx Pharmaceuticals, NovaBiotics, Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals, SolAeroMed, Translate Bio, Inc., Path BioAnalytics, Aridis Pharmaceuticals, Vertex Pharmaceuticals, AlgiPharma, Corbus Pharmaceuticals, Galapagos NV, Santhera Pharmaceuticals, Calithera Biosciences, Inc, AbbVie, Spyryx Biosciences, Inc., Verona Pharma, Laurent Pharmaceuticals Inc., Ligand Pharmaceuticals, Boehringer Ingelheim, OrPro Therapeutics, Protalix Biotherapeutics, Krystal Biotech, Insmed Incorporated, BiomX, Arcturus Therapeutics, and others are developing potential drug candidates to improve the Cystic Fibrosis treatment scenario.

• Promising Cystic Fibrosis Pipeline Therapies such as OligoG, Ensifentrine, MRT5005, CB280, KB407, SPL84231, and others

• The Cystic Fibrosis companies and academics are working to assess challenges and seek opportunities that could influence Cystic Fibrosis R&D. The therapies under development are focused on novel approaches to treat/improve Cystic Fibrosis.

Request a sample and discover the recent advances in Cystic Fibrosis treatment and click here for Cystic Fibrosis Pipeline Report @ www.delveinsight.com/sample-request/cystic-fibrosis-pipeline?utm_source=openpr&utm_medium=pressrelease&utm_campaign=ypr

Cystic Fibrosis Overview
Cystic fibrosis is a progressive, genetic disease that causes long-lasting lung infections and limits the ability to breathe over time. More than 30,000 children and adults in the United States have CF (70,000 worldwide) and CF affects people of every racial and ethnic group. In people with CF, mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene cause the CFTR protein to become dysfunctional.

Recent Breakthroughs of Cystic Fibrosis Treatment Landscape

• In December 2021, AlgiPharma has been awarded up to NOK 16 million from the Norwegian Research Councils Innovation Project for the Industrial Sector program for the project "Therapeutic Alginates for Resistant and Recurrent Infections: Generating Eradication Therapies (TARRGET)". The project grant awarded from the Research Council combined with the Norwegian government tax incentive scheme (SkatteFUNN) results in a total award value for AlgiPharma of about NOK 22 million (about EUR 2.2 MM / USD 2.5 MM).

• AlgiPharma has received more than USD 46 million in research and development grants from EU's 7th framework program, Horizon 2020, and Eurostars programs, the Norwegian Research Council, Innovate UK, US Army through Congressional Earmark funding, and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF).

• In November 2021, Calithera Biosciences shared interim safety and efficacy results from a Phase 1b, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation trial evaluating CB-280, the company's investigational arginase inhibitor, in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF). The data were shared in a poster presentation at the North American Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Conference (NACFC; Abstract 529).CB-280 demonstrated linear pharmacokinetics with plasma exposure increasing proportionally with dose. Complete and continuous target inhibition in plasma was achieved at the 100 mg dose and above. CB-280 also demonstrated robust pharmacodynamic effects, with rapid and significant dose-proportional increases in plasma arginine, the key driver of NO production.

• In November 2021, Eloxx Pharmaceuticals announced positive topline results from the monotherapy arms of its Phase 2 clinical trial of ELX-02 in Class 1 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with at least one G542X nonsense allele mutation. ELX-02 was well tolerated and achieved a statistically significant 5.4mmol/L reduction in sweat chloride in patients at the1.5mg/kg/day dose.

• In October 2021, Boehringer Ingelheim, IP Group, the UK Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium (GTC, consisting of researchers from Imperial College London and the Universities of Oxford and Edinburgh) and Oxford Biomedica (OXB), today that Boehringer Ingelheim has exercised its options on intellectual property and know-how from the partners to progress and further accelerate the development of a potential, new treatment option for patients with CF. In the partnership, IP Group, acting on behalf of the three GTC host Universities, is granting exclusive global rights to develop, manufacture, register, and commercialize this lentiviral vector-based gene therapy for the treatment of cystic fibrosis. The GTC is additionally contributing its knowledge in pre-clinical research and clinical gene therapy development. OXB is adding its leading competence in manufacturing lentiviral vector-based therapies to Boehringer Ingelheim's expertise in the development of novel breakthrough therapies for respiratory diseases.

• In August 2021, Sanofi entered into a definitive agreement with Translate Bio (NASDAQ: TBIO), a clinical-stage mRNA therapeutics company, under which Sanofi will acquire all outstanding shares of Translate Bio for $38.00 per share in cash, which represents a total equity value of approximately $3.2 billion (on a fully diluted basis). The Sanofi and Translate Bio Boards of Directors unanimously approved the transaction.On the therapeutic side, Translate Bio has an early-stage pipeline in cystic fibrosis and other rare pulmonary diseases. In addition, discovery work is ongoing in diseases that affect the liver, and Translate Bio's MRTTM platform may be applied to various classes of treatments, such as therapeutic antibodies or vaccines in areas such as oncology. Sanofi's recent acquisition of Tidal Therapeutics expanded the company's mRNA research capabilities in both immuno-oncology and inflammatory diseases. The Translate Bio acquisition further accelerates Sanofi's efforts to develop transformative medicines using mRNA technology.

• In August 2019, Path BioAnalytics Inc. (PBA) announced it had licensed rights to cavosonstat from Laurel Therapeutics. Cavosonstat is a novel CFTR modulator designed to correct a subset of CFTR mutations by increasing stability of the CFTR protein in the cell membrane through inhibition of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) and preservation of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO).

Request a sample and discover the recent advances in Cystic Fibrosis Pipeline Therapies, visit Cystic Fibrosis Treatment Landscape @ www.delveinsight.com/sample-request/cystic-fibrosis-pipeline?utm_source=openpr&utm_medium=pressrelease&utm_campaign=ypr

Cystic Fibrosis Emerging Drugs Profile

• ELX-02: Eloxx Pharmaceuticals
ELX-02, is a eukaryotic ribosomal selective glycoside (ERSG) designed to increase the read-through activity in patients with nonsense mutations and enable the production of sufficient amounts of full-length functional protein to restore activity. It is currently in phase II stage of development to treat Cystic fibrosis.Eloxx has also begun evaluation of inhaled (nebulizer-based) delivery of the current subcutaneous formulation of ELX-02. Eloxx believes that inhaled delivery has the potential to further improve the activity of ELX-02 as a single agent and in combination with other drugs given potential for increased drug exposure in the lung versus plasma. Prior animal studies have shown a 19-fold increase in ELX-02 exposure at a similar dose when administered as an inhalation agent versus subcutaneously. We expect to submit an Investigational New Drug application in the second half of 2022.

• S1226: SolAeroMed
S1226 is SolAeroMed's lead therapy. S1226 is formulated to rapidly reopen constricted, mucus plugged airways, and should increase the effectiveness of respiratory drug delivery. The S1226 formulation consists of aerosolized carbon dioxide (CO2) and nebulized perflubron; which is delivered into the lung. The delivery of this formulation results in an immediate relaxant effect on the patient's constricted airways, supported by a lowering of surface tension in inflamed areas (resulting in enhanced bronchial dilation) and possible clearing of mucus plugs of blocked airways.SolAeroMed has completed a phase I trial demonstrating S1226 is safe in healthy subjects and a phase II clinical trial showing S1226 is safe and effective in relieving an allergen-induced asthma. SolAeroMed is currently conducting a phase II clinical trial in cystic fibrosis.

• Lenabasum: Corbus Pharmaceuticals
Lenabasum is a novel, oral, small molecule that selectively binds as an agonist to the receptor type 2 (CB2) and resolves inflammation and limits fibrosis in animal and human models of disease. CB2 is preferentially expressed on activated immune cells and on fibroblasts, muscle cells, and endothelial cells. Lenabasum has demonstrated acceptable safety and tolerability profiles and has not been immunosuppressive in clinical studies to date.CF-002 was a multinational Phase 2b study evaluating the efficacy and safety of lenabasum in CF. This was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study, with dosing of lenabasum at 5 mg twice per day, lenabasum 20 mg twice per day or placebo twice per day for 28 weeks, with 4 weeks safety follow-up off active treatment. The primary efficacy endpoint was the event rate of new PEx per subject per 28 weeks, when the primary definition of new PEx was physician diagnosis of PEx, prescription of new antibiotics for that PEx starting more than 28 days after completion of the last antibiotic course for any previous PEx, with 4 out of 12 Fuch's criteria present in the subject. The Phase 2b CF study was funded in part by a Therapeutic Development Award for up to $25 Million from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

• Lonodelestat: Santhera Pharmaceuticals
Lonodelestat (previously known as POL6014), a highly potent and selective peptide inhibitor of human neutrophil elastase (hNE), is in development for the treatment of cystic fibrosis. Currently, it is in Phase I/II stage of development. Santhera obtained the worldwide, exclusive rights from Polyphor AG to develop and commercialize lonodelestat in CF and other diseases. In preclinical studies lonodelestat was effective in animal models of neutrophil activation in lung tissue and of acute lung injury (ALI). Currently available clinical data demonstrated that single and multiple doses (Phase 1b) of lonodelestat when administered by inhalation via an optimized eFlow® nebulizer (PARI Pharma GmbH) can lead to high drug concentrations within the lung, resulting in inhibition of hNE in sputum of patients, an enzyme associated with lung tissue inflammation. The Phase 1b study further confirmed the tolerability of lonodelestat after treatment of up to four weeks in patients with CF. Lonodelestat may also show therapeutic benefit for a range of neutrophilic pulmonary diseases with high medical need such as non-CF bronchiectasis (NCFB), alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). Lonodelestat has EU orphan drug designations (ODD) for the treatment of CF as well as for AATD and PCD in both the EU and US.

DelveInsight's Cystic Fibrosis Pipeline Report covers around 80+ products under different phases of clinical development like
• Late stage products (Phase III)
• Mid-stage products (Phase II)
• Early-stage product (Phase I) along with the details of
• Pre-clinical and Discovery stage candidates
• Discontinued & Inactive candidates
• Route of Administration

Get to know more information about the Cystic Fibrosis Emerging Drugs and Cystic Fibrosis Companies of the report @ www.delveinsight.com/sample-request/cystic-fibrosis-pipeline?utm_source=openpr&utm_medium=pressrelease&utm_campaign=ypr

Scope of the Cystic Fibrosis Pipeline Report
• Coverage- Global
• Cystic Fibrosis Pipeline Segmentation: Product Type, Molecule Type, Mechanism of Action, Route of Action
• Cystic Fibrosis Companies- Eloxx Pharmaceuticals, NovaBiotics, Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals, SolAeroMed, Translate Bio, Inc., Path BioAnalytics, Aridis Pharmaceuticals, Vertex Pharmaceuticals, AlgiPharma, Corbus Pharmaceuticals, Galapagos NV, Santhera Pharmaceuticals, Calithera Biosciences, Inc, AbbVie, Spyryx Biosciences, Inc., Verona Pharma, Laurent Pharmaceuticals Inc., Ligand Pharmaceuticals, Boehringer Ingelheim, OrPro Therapeutics, Protalix Biotherapeutics, Krystal Biotech, Insmed Incorporated, BiomX, Arcturus Therapeutics, and others
• Cystic Fibrosis Therapies- OligoG, Ensifentrine, MRT5005, CB280, KB407, SPL84231, and others

Dive deep into rich insights for drugs for Cystic Fibrosis Market Drivers and Cystic Fibrosis Market Barriers, click here Cystic Fibrosis Unmet Needs and Analyst Views @ www.delveinsight.com/sample-request/cystic-fibrosis-pipeline?utm_source=openpr&utm_medium=pressrelease&utm_campaign=ypr

Table of content
1. Introduction
2. Executive Summary
3. Cystic Fibrosis: Overview
4. Pipeline Therapeutics
5. Therapeutic Assessment
6. Cystic Fibrosis - DelveInsight's Analytical Perspective
7. Late Stage Products (Phase III)
8. Drug name: Company Name
9. Mid Stage Products (Phase II)
10. OligoG : Algi pharma
11. Early Stage Products (Phase I)
12. CB280:Calithera Biosciences
13. Preclinical and Discovery Stage Products
14. SPL84231: Spli Sense
15. Inactive Products
16. Cystic Fibrosis -Key Companies
17. Cystic Fibrosis -Key Products
18. Cystic Fibrosis - Unmet Needs
19. Cystic Fibrosis - Market Drivers and Barriers
20. Cystic Fibrosis - Future Perspectives and Conclusion
21. Cystic Fibrosis -Analyst Views
22. Cystic Fibrosis- Key Companies
23. Appendix

Got Queries? Find out the related information on Cystic Fibrosis Mergers and acquisitions, Cystic Fibrosis Licensing Activities, and Click here for Cystic Fibrosis Emerging Drugs, and Recent Trends @ www.delveinsight.com/sample-request/cystic-fibrosis-pipeline?utm_source=openpr&utm_medium=pressrelease&utm_campaign=ypr

Trending Market Research Reports in 2023 By DelveInsight

Stem Cell Market- www.delveinsight.com/report-store/stem-cell-market

Anastomosis Device Market- www.delveinsight.com/report-store/anastomotic-leak-devices-market

Oncolytic virus cancer therapy pipeline- www.delveinsight.com/report-store/oncolytic-virus-cancer-therapy-pipeline-insight-2021

Persistent Corneal Epithelial Defects Market- www.delveinsight.com/report-store/persistent-epithelial-defect-market

Technical Due Diligence Firms | Technical Due Diligence Firms- www.delveinsight.com/consulting/due-diligence-services

Shingles Market- www.delveinsight.com/report-store/shingles-market

Hand Foot Syndrome/Palmar-Plantar Erythrodysesthesia Syndrome Market- www.delveinsight.com/report-store/hand-foot-syndrome-market

Ptosis Market- www.delveinsight.com/report-store/ptosis-market

Uncomplicated Urinary Tract Infection Market- www.delveinsight.com/report-store/uncomplicated-urinary-tract-infection-uuti-market

Otitis Media Market- www.delveinsight.com/report-store/otitis-media-market

Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease Market- www.delveinsight.com/report-store/pelizaeus-merzbacher-disease-market

Transverse Myelitis Market- www.delveinsight.com/report-store/transverse-myelitis-market

PCSK9 Market- www.delveinsight.com/report-store/pcsk9-inhibitors-market

Cough in IPF Market- www.delveinsight.com/report-store/cough-in-idiopathic-pulmonary-fibrosis-ipf-market

Diabetes Insipidus Market- www.delveinsight.com/report-store/diabetes-insipidus-market

Advanced Liver Cancer Market- www.delveinsight.com/report-store/advanced-liver-cancer-market

Chagas Disease Market- www.delveinsight.com/report-store/chagas-disease-market

Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Market- www.delveinsight.com/report-store/familial-adenomatous-polyposis-market

Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer Market- www.delveinsight.com/report-store/metastatic-pancreatic-cancer-mpc-market

Trichotillomania Market- www.delveinsight.com/report-store/trichotillomania-ttm-market

Temporomandibular Disorders Market- www.delveinsight.com/report-store/temporomandibular-disorders-market

Testicular Neoplasm Market- www.delveinsight.com/report-store/testicular-neoplasm-market

Joint Reconstruction Devices Market- www.delveinsight.com/report-store/joint-reconstruction-devices-market

Rhinosinusitis Market- www.delveinsight.com/report-store/rhinosinusitis-market

Atrial Flutter Market- www.delveinsight.com/report-store/atrial-flutter-market

About Us

DelveInsight is a Business Consulting and Market research company, providing expert business solutions for the healthcare domain and offering quintessential advisory services in the areas of R&D, Strategy Formulation, Operations, Competitive Intelligence, Competitive Landscaping, and Mergers & Acquisitions.

Company Name: DelveInsight
Contact Person: Yash Bhardwaj
Email: [email protected]
Phone: 9193216187
Address: 304 S. Jones Blvd #2432
City: Las Vegas
State: NV 89107
Country: United States
Website: www.delveinsight.com/consulting/due-diligence-services

This release was published on openPR.

Source link

In today’s lifestyle we have lost the understanding of the pivotal role breathing has on our body. Breathing provides oxygen to produce energy and maintain normal metabolism.

Exhaling carbon dioxide helps in maintaining pH levels in the blood. Deep breathing activates the relaxation response and reduces blood pressure and heart beat. This helps in reduction of stress. Proper breathing has shown to boost the immune system by increasing oxygenation, and improving mental health.

Our body controls breathing through a complex interplay between the respiratory centre in the brain and the muscles. The respiratory centre is located in the medulla oblongata and pons regions of the brainstem. It receives input from sensory receptors in the body and regulates the rate and depth of breathing. The respiratory centre receives signals from chemoreceptors in the blood and the brain, which monitor the levels of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and pH in the body. If the levels of these substances change, the respiratory centre adjusts the rate of breathing accordingly. The respiratory centre sends signals to the motor neurons that control the diaphragm and intercostal muscles, which regulate the volume of air in the lungs and the rate of breathing. The process of breathing is regulated by a feedback loop, where the rate and depth of breathing are adjusted based on the body’s need for oxygen and the levels of carbon dioxide and pH in the body.

There are various breathing patterns, each with a unique impact on the body. Some of the most common types include: Diaphragmatic breathing which involves breathing deeply into the diaphragm, expanding the abdomen, and filling the lungs with air. Another is controlled breathing which refers to techniques used to regulate the rate and depth of breathing, such as slow, deep breathing or breath-holding. Whereas mouth breathing refers to breathing through the mouth rather than the nose, and can impact the body’s ability to filter and humidify inhaled air. Shallow breathing involves taking shallow breaths that do not fully expand the lungs, and can be a sign of stress or anxiety. Rapid breathing is when the rate of breathing increases, can be a symptom of a variety of medical conditions, including panic attacks, asthma, and heart problems. It’s interesting to know Clavicular breathing is a type of shallow breathing that involves only the upper chest, and can occur as a result of stress or tension. The most famous Yogic breathing is type of breathing which involves various techniques used in yoga and meditation, including pranayama, which involves controlled breathing to promote physical and mental well-being.

Different activities and situations may require different breathing patterns. Diaphragmatic breathing involves using the diaphragm, a muscle at the bottom of the ribcage, to control the flow of air into the lungs. To practice diaphragmatic breathing, lie down on your back, place one hand on your chest and the other on your belly, and breathe deeply, focusing on moving your belly up and down as you inhale and exhale. Whereas slowing down the rate of breathing and taking deep breaths can help reduce stress and promote relaxation. To practice slow and deep breathing, inhale slowly through your nose and exhale slowly through your mouth, focusing on the sensation of your breath. On the other hand, breathing through the nose can help filter, warm, and moisten the air before it enters the lungs, which can improve lung function and reduce the risk of respiratory infections. Pursed-lip breathing involves exhaling through pursed lips, like you’re blowing out a candle. It can help improve lung function and reduce shortness of breath in individuals with lung conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

In general, the correct way to breathe is the one in which you feel comfortable and allows you to take deep breaths without strain. If you have a medical condition that affects your breathing, it is important to consult a doctor for specific guidance.

Advantages of proper breathing are many like Improved oxygenation, reduced stress and anxiety, increased energy levels, better posture, improved focus and concentration, reduced symptoms of depression, anxiety disorders, improved digestion, enhanced athletic performance, better sleep quality, boosted immune system, etc.

As we all know, yoga and deep breathing helps calm the nervous system. The breath aspect of yoga is called ‘pranayama’. Pranayama is a Sanskrit word which means "regulation of breath." It is a type of yogic breathing that involves controlled breathing exercises to promote physical and mental well-being.

In pranayama, the focus is on controlling the breath through specific techniques, such as slow and deep breathing, breath-holding, and alternate nostril breathing. These techniques are believed to help regulate the flow of prana, or life force energy, in the body, promoting physical, mental, and emotional balance.

Pranayama is often used in conjunction with yoga postures (asanas) and meditation, as a means of calming the mind and reducing stress. It is believed to have several benefits, including improved respiratory function, increased oxygenation of the body, reduced stress and anxiety, and improved overall well-being. Pranayama should only be practiced under the guidance of a trained instructor, as improper technique can lead to health issues.

We can also improve our breathing patterns by regularly exercising, maintaining moderate weight, avoiding cigarettes and tobacco consumption, avoiding eating large meals, staying hydrated, etc.



Linkedin


Disclaimer

Views expressed above are the author's own.



END OF ARTICLE


Source link

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic, progressive lung disease that is characterized by respiratory symptoms associated with chronic airflow limitation, affecting an estimated 300 million individuals globally.1,2 COPD is now the third leading cause of death worldwide, with approximately 3 million individuals dying annually from the disease.1,2

The risk of mortality from COPD increases significantly in the first year after readmission within 30 days of hospitalization.3 Among patients readmitted within that time span, the projected absolute increase in mortality risk is 4% at 30 days.3 Meanwhile, for patients with severe disease, the 2-year mortality rate is estimated to be 50%.3 Because of this, COPD represents an essential health challenge that is preventable and treatable.

Historically, the United States health care system was sustained by prospective payment, minimizing hospital length of stay and maximizing turnover.4 In an effort to improve the quality of care and reduce readmission risks, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program was launched in 2012.5 Hospitals were fined up to 1% of diagnosis-related group payments (this penalty increased to 3% in 2015) for too many readmissions, totaling almost $1.9 billion in penalties.6

On average, a COPD-related emergency department visit costs $647, whereas an admission ranges from $7242 (nonintensive care unit) to $44,909 (intensive care unit with intubation).7 These costs increase over the years and can be intensified by continuous readmissions. Approximately 20% of patients hospitalized for COPD exacerbation are readmitted within 30 days of discharge.3 Additionally, a history of 2 or more exacerbations in the previous year predicts the 30-day readmission of patients with COPD, suggesting that there are numerous opportunities to prevent readmissions and their associated consequences.3

The risk factors for rehospitalization in patients with COPD vary depending on the patient’s condition, providers, and system factors. These can include older age at diagnosis, COPD severity, current smoking habit, intervention before admission, low body mass index, and comorbidities.1,2 Among these factors, 2 amendable risk factors of early readmission for patients with COPD are health care providers and system factors. When the readmission rate is high and unexplained, it may be a result of issues in the transition process and postdischarge management. This makes it imperative that health care providers in acute care settings carefully review the discharge process to diminish readmission risks. Appropriately managed and effective care transitions for patients with COPD can prevent the risk of readmission and mortality, especially for those who need a wide range of services (Table8).

Pharmacists are well positioned to be involved in reducing readmissions with a wide variety of interventions, such as counseling prior to hospital discharge, medication reconciliation, therapy change management, dispensing, postdischarge phone calls, and face-to-face and/or telemedicine visits. The National Transitions of Care Coalition supports pharmacist inclusion to help reduce readmissions.9 Recent studies have demonstrated that pharmacists’ involvement, specifically in COPD care, leads to improved discharge medication reconciliation for the elderly (n = 29) and reduced 30-day readmissions from 22.2% to 16.0%.10 Likewise, another study showed that pharmacists dispensing inhalers and conducting discharge counseling (n = 620) reduced 30- and 60-day readmissions from 21.4% to 8.7% (P = .0016) and 33% to 23% (P = .0056), respectively.11

Additionally, in a more recent retrospective study, investigators sought to evaluate the impact of a comprehensive and collaborative pharmacist transitions of care service for hospitalized patients with COPD compared with usual care.12 The pharmacist interventions included discharge counseling, medication reconciliation, medication access assistance, therapy changes, and postdischarge long-term follow-up provided to underserved patients with a primary care provider at the study clinic and admitted to the affiliated hospital with a primary diagnosis of COPD exacerbation. The primary outcome was a 180-day composite of COPD related hospitalizations and emergency department visits. The study results identified 65 patients, with a total of 101 index admissions. The mean age of the cohort was 62.5 years, approximately 55.3% were women, and 67.7% were Black or African American.12

The primary composite was significantly lower in the pharmacist intervention group compared with usual care (mean difference, 0.82; P = .0364; 95% CI, 0.05-1.60), driven by lower 30-day hospitalizations in the intervention group (mean difference, 0.15; P = .0099; 95% CI, 0.04-0.27). The cost associated with COPD-related hospitalizations was substantially lower in the pharmacist intervention group compared with usual care ($173,808; P = .0330), as well as before intervention ($79,662; P = .0233).12 The study concluded that a comprehensive, collaborative pharmacist transition of care service significantly reduced 30-day COPD related hospital readmissions, emergency department revisits, and associated costs in an underserved population. The authors attributed positive outcomes to a combination of activities (ie, discharge counseling, medication reconciliation, access and adherence support, and inpatient and outpatient therapy changes) and collaboration with team members such as physicians, nurses, community pharmacists, social workers, financial counselors, and case managers. Another critical step in improving the transition of care is connecting community pharmacists to inpatient pharmacists and other team members, as well as including disciplines such as respiratory therapists. Focusing on medication adherence can have a substantial impact, as inhaler adherence rates range as low as 10% to 40%.12

It is important to note that clinical pharmacist activities advanced during the time of the study, from initially placing recommendations to implementing therapy changes using shared decision-making with the team and patient discussion.12 At this study site, the pharmacist was approved by the medical director to automatically refer patients to pulmonary rehabilitation and became involved in teaching pulmonary rehabilitation medication courses. Other pharmacist activities included primary care clinic visits, teaching, administrative duties, and quality initiatives. Consequently, the pharmacist capture rate varied over time and was difficult to monitor (estimated at approximately 50% to 80% during the study).12 Notably, the pharmacist only intervened with patients who were admitted to the hospital rather than those who visited the emergency department without hospitalization.12

It is a known fact that minorities and patients of lower socioeconomic status are disproportionately affected by COPD, and hospitals are confronted with higher readmission rates and penalties from CMS.13 Specific socioeconomic factors listed in the literature include Medicaid insurance, low income, smoking, nonadherence to medications, and poor literacy. Compounding these challenges is the lack of resources supporting indigent care.13 This group can potentially benefit most from the integration of a pharmacist.

Extrapolating findings from this study can justify full-time positions focused on COPD transitions of care. Institutions can pursue transitions of care compensation using numerous methods. Postdischarge phone calls, clinic appointments, and telephone follow-ups are reimbursable ambulatory care services (eg, transitions of care management, clinic visits, chronic care management). The National Committee for Quality Assurance includes postdischarge medication reconciliation as a performance metric in the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set.14

Using standardized comprehensive checklists throughout the continuum of care for COPD ensures that critical domains of care are not lost during transitions. The checklist includes vital components of care during the different stages of stable and acute COPDcare management.

Conclusions

Transitional care can be an effective approach to mitigating the high number of hospital readmissions of patients with COPD. Compilation of the aforementioned evaluations justifies a solid, comprehensive, and collaborative COPD transition of care program to improve morbidity, mortality, and associated costs for patients with COPD.

References
1. GBD 2017 Causes of Death Collaborators. Global, regional, and national age-sex-specific mortality for 282 causes of death in 195 countries and territories, 1980-2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017. Lancet. 2018;392(10159):1736-1788. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(18)32203-7

2. 2022 GOLD reports. Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease. Accessed November 20, 2022. goldcopd.org/2022-gold-reports/

3. Guerrero M, Crisafulli E, Liapikou A, et al. Readmission for acute exacer-bation within 30 days of discharge is associated with a subsequent progressive increase in mortality risk in COPD patients: a long-term observational study. PLoS One. 2016;11(3):e0150737. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0150737

4. Kosecoff J, Kahn KL, Rogers WH, et al. Prospective payment system and impairment at discharge: the ‘quicker-and-sicker’ story revisited. JAMA. 1990;264(15):1908-1983. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03450150080035

5. Boozary AS, Manchin J, Wicker RF. The Medicare hospital readmis-sions reduction program: time for reform. JAMA. 2015;314(4):347-348. doi:10.1001/jama.2015.6507

6. AHA fact sheet: hospital Readmissions Reduction Program. American Hospital Association. Accessed January 9, 2023. www.aha.org/factsheet/2016-01-18-aha-fact-sheet-hospital-readmissions-reduction-program

7. Dalal AA, Shah M, D’Souza AO, Rane P. Costs of COPD exacerbations in the emergency department and inpatient setting. Respir Med. 2011;105(3):454-460. doi:10.1016/j.rmed.2010.09.003

8. Transition of care checklist. ASHP Advantage. Accessed November 20, 2022. www.copdcare.org/transition-of-care-checklist.php

9. Advisors council. National Transitions of Care Coalition. Accessed January 9, 2023. www.ntocc.org/advisors-council?rq=Advisors%20council

10. Eisenhower C. Impact of a pharmacist-conducted medication reconciliation at discharge on readmissions of elderly patients with COPD. Ann Pharmacother. 2014;48(2):203-208. doi:10.1177/1060028013512277

11. Blee J, Roux RK, Gautreaux S, Sherer JT, Garey KW. Dispensing inhalers to patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on hospital discharge: effects on prescription filling and readmission. Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2015;72(14):1204-1208. doi:10.2146/ajhp140621

12. Kim J, Lin A, Absher R, Makhlouf T, Wells C. Comprehensive and collaborative pharmacist transitions of care service for underserved patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Chronic Obstr Pulm Dis. 2021;8(1):152-161.

13. Braman SS. Hospital readmissions for COPD: we can meet the challenge. Chronic Obstr Pulm Dis. 2015;2(1):4-7. doi:10.15326/jcopdf.2.1.2015.0130

14. Healthcare effectiveness data and information set. National Committee for Quality Assurance. Accessed November 20, 2022.

About the Author

Deepali Dixit, PharmD, BCPS, BCCCP, FCCM, is a clinical associate professor at the Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, and a clinical pharmacy specialist, critical care, at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Brunswick, New Jersey.

Source link

People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may experience fewer acute disease exacerbations if they regularly use noninvasive ventilation at night, a small study in Greece reported.

“Good” nighttime use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), a type of noninvasive ventilation, also aided lung function in COPD patients with OSA, its researchers noted.

The study, “Effect of compliance to continuous positive airway pressure on exacerbations, lung function and symptoms in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and obstructive sleep apnea (overlap syndrome),” was published in The Clinical Respiratory Journal.

Recommended Reading

A dropper squirts blood alongside a number of vials of blood.

Ideal CPAP use for obstructive sleep apnea is four or more hours each night

COPD occurs when the lungs and the airways become inflamed, causing breathing problems that tend to worsen over time. A sudden worsening of disease symptoms, called an acute exacerbation, is also known and can require hospitalization.

People with overlap syndrome, or COPD as well as OSA, are more likely to experience episodes of acute exacerbation when their OSA is left untreated.

OSA occurs when the airways become partly or fully blocked, and breathing stops and starts repeatedly during sleep. Many with OSA need use a CPAP machine to help them breathe better while they’re asleep.

A CPAP machine is a small, portable device that blows air at a constant pressure via a hose into a mask worn over the nose. The pressurized air helps keep the airways open during sleep.

A research team largely at Democritus University of Thrace investigated whether following a nighttime schedule for CPAP correctly and consistently brought additional benefits to people with overlap syndrome.

The study included 59 people (54 men and five women) with stable COPD and newly diagnosed with OSA, who began treatment with CPAP at a center. According to the researchers, all were “treated according to the latest COPD and OSA guidelines.”

About one year into treatment, 29 patients showed good compliance, used their CPAP device for at least four hours each night (average of 5.5 hours) on at least 70% of all nights. The other 30 patients showed poor compliance, using their CPAP machine an average of 36 minutes each night.

At study entry (a baseline measure), the mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of people with good compliance was about twice that of people with poor compliance (41.7 vs. 20.9 events per hour of sleep). AHI is a measure of the number of times a person experiences apnea (no breathing) or hypopnea (slowed breathing) during the night, divided by the hours of sleep.

After one year of treatment, both those with good and poor compliance saw their mean AHI drop (2.3 and 0 events per hour of sleep). Both also scored significantly better on the Epworth sleepiness scale, which measures daytime sleepiness.

Gain in lung function evident in measures of FEV1, six-minute walking test

However, only those with good compliance saw their lung function get significantly better. They experienced improvements in FEV1, a measure of how much air a person can forcibly exhale in a second after a breath, and total lung capacity, which is the maximum volume of air that can be taken into the lungs.

They also performed better on a six-minute walk test, which measures the distance covered in six minutes, and on the COPD Assessment Test (CAT), which looks at the impact of COPD on a person’s life and how this changes over time.

The number of acute exacerbations also decreased from 17 at baseline to five after one year of treatment in people with good compliance, whereas it remained unchanged, at 15, in those with poor compliance.

Likewise, hospitalizations to treat exacerbations fell over the year in patients with good compliance, from six to none. A decease was also noted in poorly compliant patients, from 12 to five hospitalizations, but this difference did not reach significance.

“In our study, [acute COPD exacerbations] correlated with poor compliance to CPAP treatment and hours of CPAP use,” the researchers wrote.

“This study addresses the central role of compliance to OSA treatment with CPAP on the management of these [COPD] patients, a finding that merits further research,” they added.

Source link

Erika M. Moseson, MD

This study from The University of Newcastle provides an important window into the impact of wildland fire (or “bushfire” in Australia) on children with asthma. Wildland fire generates a great deal of PM2.5, which is a driver of multiple adverse health impacts among people of all life stages, but children are especially vulnerable.

These tiny particles are a fraction of the size of a human hair. When we inhale, we bring them into the bloodstream, causing disease in multiple organs. We have ample evidence that there are increases in asthma attacks among children on days of poor air quality and elevated PM2.5 from other studies, including work that has previously been highlighted here.

This study indicates that even among children not in exacerbation arriving for regularly scheduled testing on days of high PM2.5, FVC has decreased. I agree with the authors that it is likely that this decrease in FVC may represent an increase in air trapping driven by inhaling the PM2.5.

I live in Oregon, and we have the dubious distinction of having had the worst air in the world because of wildfires a couple of times in the last several years. I am raising three children in air that has been rated as “Hazardous” or “Beyond Index” on the Air Quality Index.

As a lung doctor, what do I do when I know the potential lifelong complications of breathing PM2.5? I empathize with the parents of those children with asthma in this study. It must be a great source of worry to them to know that the air their children are breathing may be affecting their lung function. It is especially significant that this was picked up in such a relatively small sample of children.

So, what can doctors and health professionals do about this? First, we need to educate ourselves. I didn’t learn anything about particulate matter, ozone or air pollution in medical school or during my medical training. Part of the mission of Air Health Our Health is to ensure that we all know how air pollution can affect our health.

Fortunately, if you can talk about cigarettes with your patients, you can talk about PM2.5. The punchline is “Don’t light things on fire and breathe them into your lungs.” This applies whether we are talking about cigarettes, diesel, wildfires and more.

I host the Air Health Our Health podcast and interview a range of experts to educate clinicians, parents and the community at large on the health impacts of particulate matter, climate change, wildfires and more. Pediatricians and parents may be interested in the episode with Franziska Rosser, MD, MPH, a pediatric pulmonologist who researches the Air Quality Index, kids and how parents and pediatricians should use it.

Because this is not an individual-level problem, we in health care also need to educate our communities. We need to advocate for ways to decrease the climate change that is driving these wildland fires as well as also for resiliency measures. For example, we need to ensure that there is access to clean indoor air in the time of wildfires, knowing how to talk about HEPA filters with our patients and how to avoid or mitigate other sources of indoor air pollution, such as gas stoves.

I provided a brief introduction to Healio on the interaction of climate change and particulate matter on health in this Healio video from CHEST 2022. It is important for those in health care to learn how climate change and air pollution affect our health so we can work for cleaner air for all our patients.

Erika M. Moseson, MD

Pulmonary Section Chair, Legacy Emanuel Medical Center, Portland, Oregon

Host, Air Health Our Health Podcast

Past President, Oregon Thoracic Society

Member, Environmental Health Policy Committee, American Thoracic Society

American Lung Association Health Professional for Clean Air and Climate Action

Disclosures: Moseson reports no relevant financial disclosures.

Source link

PRESS RELEASE

Published January 30, 2023

MyNewLungs.com offers interactive courses and modules for lung and heart rehabilitation, curated by licensed practitioners and with a commitment to planting one tree for every patient who participates in the program.

January 30, 2023 - The Home Rehabilitation Network (HRN) is proud to announce the launch of its new online video library of health and therapy classes. The library, which is available at MyNewLungs.com, is a comprehensive resource for those suffering from respiratory conditions such as COPD and offers a wide range of interactive courses and modules expertly curated by licensed practitioners.

HRN is offering a free trial access to the online video library, which allows patients to explore the various therapies and subscriptions available. By signing up for the free trial, patients can experience the benefits of remote pulmonary rehab, which has been proven to be more effective than traditional facilities. In fact, HRN's program has a success rate of up to 98.7%.

Some of the benefits of HRN's program include improved lung function and capacity, an increase in walking distance by 200ft or more, a decrease in the effort of breathing, and increased tolerance for exercise. Many patients also experience a complete discontinuation of respiratory medications (9% of patients) and complete weaning off of supplemental oxygen (37% of patients).

The program is designed to be completed at the patient's own pace, but we recommend that therapy is done every day to maximize the program's benefits. With the "All Access Master Pass," patients will have access to the "Boot-Camp," all existing therapy weeks, live weekly webinars, as well as a variety of new content being released all the time. Patients also have the option to join in with our live clinicians and do therapy together, with us.

For those who would like to join our three-month formal pulmonary rehab program, HRN offers a "Tele-Rehabilitation" program where patients can interact remotely with a licensed practitioner who is assigned to them and is well-seasoned in treating their condition. The program also includes a comprehensive video therapy library containing over 1700 topics and growing, as well as a discussion group where patients can interact with their peers in a supportive and caring environment.

In addition to the therapeutic benefits of the program, HRN also has a commitment to giving back to the earth. For every patient that participates in our program, we will plant one tree in the location most needed. So far, we have donated to the National Forest Foundation and ONETREEPLANTED.ORG totaling 100’s of trees to help people and animals breathe better.

HRN's programs are designed to make therapy simple and enjoyable. They include comprehensive assessments, personalized therapy programs, an extensive video library, a boot camp (free), and a Facebook COPD support group (free / invite only). Some of the benefits of HRN's programs include lung function improvement, weaning off oxygen, increase in walking distance, decrease in work of breathing, increased toleration to exercise, and an increase in quality of life.

Video Link: www.youtube.com/watch?v=uMHjhp33adg

For sign-up assistance call: 410-871-4601 M-F 8:30am-4:30pm EST. Patients can also visit thehomerehabnetwork.com/our-services/ or training.mynewlungs.com/ for more information or to register for the program.

Overall, HRN's new online video library of health and therapy classes is a comprehensive resource for those suffering from respiratory conditions such as COPD and offers a wide range of interactive courses and modules expertly curated by licensed practitioners. The free trial access is a great opportunity for patients to experience the benefits of remote pulmonary rehab, which has been proven to be more effective than traditional facilities. With a success rate of up to 98.7% and a commitment to give back, HRN is a great choice for anyone looking to improve their lung function and overall health.

Media Contact
Company Name: The Home Rehabilitation Network
Contact Person: CEO - Alex Grichuhin
Email: Send Email
Phone: 1-800-341-5838
Address:11155 Red Run Blvd. #210
City: Owings Mills
State: MD 21117
Country: United States
Website: thehomerehabnetwork.com/

Source link