1

Make time to smile.

how to take better care of yourself
Getty Images

From laughing on the phone with an old friend to listening to Beyoncé to playing with your dog, don’t let joyful moments get elbowed out of your schedule, says Tochi Iroku-Malize, M.D., M.P.H., board chair of the American Academy of Family Physicians. Embracing joy can help you build resilience and avoid burnout.

2

Help your mood soar.

robin erithacus rubeculawild bird in a natural habitat
Ornitolog82//Getty Images

Go for an a.m. walk to take in the chirping of the birds — research says that listening to their songs can improve your mood for up to eight hours.

3

Just breathe.

shot of an attractive young woman sitting alone on a mat and meditating on the beach at sunset
PeopleImages//Getty Images

You may have heard about the calming benefits of mindful breathing, but it can be tough to remember the technique. Luckily, that doesn’t matter, says Michelle Di Paolo, Ph.D., of Stress and Relaxation Services of America. “Many people worry about the ‘right way’ to breathe deliberately, but when you overthink it you’re missing the benefits,” she says. “Any intentional, gently slowed breathing will lower stress.”

Advertisement - Continue Reading Below

4

Stretch it out.

happy woman stretching in bed after waking up happy young girl greets good day
oatawa//Getty Images

Every time you get up from sitting, put your hands where your lower back meets your hips, says Liza Egbogah, D.C., a chiropractor in Toronto. Take a deep breath in and, as you breathe out, slowly look up to the ceiling and then try to see the wall behind you. Take five deep breaths, then slowly come back up. This helps decompress your spine and improve your posture, which reduces stress and improves mood.

RELATED: 10 Morning Stretches for Beginners to Try

5

Swap your fats.

fresh avocado on cutting board
tashka2000//Getty Images

Eating heart-healthier can be deliciously joyful. Cooking veggies? Use olive oil in place of butter. Making a sandwich? Spread creamy avocado instead of mayo.

6

Team up to work out.

sport lifestyle concept with pink yellow dumbbells on pastel mint green background
Iryna Veklich//Getty Images

Make a weekly exercise date: “Exercise can be a fantastic way to build relationships and even inspire those around you,” says Stefani Sassos, R.D.N., nutrition director of the Good Housekeeping Institute and a NASM-certified personal trainer. A workout buddy can keep you motivated, which can help you stick with it. Plus, research shows that building close relationships is a key to happiness as we age.

Advertisement - Continue Reading Below

7

Find your comfort level.

woman in grey blouse wearing ffp2 mask
CentralITAlliance//Getty Images

When it comes to COVID-19, “go out and enjoy your life while being mindful of the fact that it hasn’t gone away,” says Dr. Iroku-Malize. “If your baseline health is good and you’ve had your vaccines, then just remember to always wash your hands, and if you get COVID-19, stay home and take care of yourself.” For people at higher risk, it’s OK to say no to big social gatherings and continue to mask in public places, she adds — no apologies or guilt required.

8

Keep it real.

banana wallpaper 2
RedHelga//Getty Images

Dark leafy greens such as kale, spinach and Swiss chard are high in fiber, which can help prevent moodiness associated with blood sugar highs and lows, Meshulam says. Throw some chard into your soup, or mix a handful of spinach with your scrambled eggs.

9

Get pickled.

korean food,instant noodle with kimchi cabbage
Nungning20//Getty Images

About 90% of serotonin (the brain’s feel-good neurotransmitter) comes from the gut, says Marissa Meshulam, R.D., of MPM Nutrition. Fermented foods are full of probiotics, which can help maintain healthy gut microbiomes. Add sauerkraut to a salad or a sandwich, use Greek yogurt instead of sour cream or top a rice dish with kimchi, she suggests.

Advertisement - Continue Reading Below

10

Eat greener.

savoy cabbage
tycoon751//Getty Images

Dark leafy greens such as kale, spinach and Swiss chard are high in fiber, which can help prevent moodiness associated with blood sugar highs and lows, Meshulam says. Throw some chard into your soup, or mix a handful of spinach with your scrambled eggs.

11

De-stress your neck.

closeup woman neck and shoulder pain and injury health care and medical concept
spukkato//Getty Images

Sore from looking down at your phone all day? Lock your fingers behind your back and squeeze your shoulder blades together, then try to bring your hands toward the ground and hold for five breaths, suggests Egbogah.

Advertisement - Continue Reading Below

13

Have a go-to second drink.

shirley temple drink
Mike Garten

Alcohol may perk up your mood at first, but since it’s a depressant, the good vibes can quickly switch to depression and anxiety. To keep from overdoing it, have a nonalcoholic beverage in mind to order after your first glass of booze — say, pineapple juice and seltzer or even a classic Shirley Temple — you’ll also wake up feeling good the next day.

14

Max out on cuddling.

married couple embracing on sofa
MoMo Productions//Getty Images

You may not always have time for sex, but you can hold hands with your partner as you shop for groceries, get some cuddles at the animal rescue or hug a friend. Research shows that physical contact lowers levels of the stress hormone cortisol.

15

Do what you love.

young woman practicing breathing exercise at home
Morsa Images//Getty Images

The world’s best workout will do nothing for your mind and body if you dread it. “Don’t be afraid to think outside the box and try something new,” suggests Sassos. “A dance- style workout like Zumba is a great way to begin — it is fun and upbeat and can even make you forget you’re there to work out.” If dance isn’t your thing, try something else with an element of fun, such as playing in a recreational soccer league or doing soothing yoga.

Advertisement - Continue Reading Below

16

Schedule your annual check-up.

caring doctor listens to patient
SDI Productions//Getty Images

There are so many health checks to take care of (mammogram, colonoscopy, vaccines) that it can be easy to get overwhelmed. Your primary care doctor can help keep you on track, Dr. Iroku-Malize says.

17

Cheer up your tootsies.

first stirring on a bright morning
PeopleImages//Getty Images

No one is happy when their feet hurt. Loosen yours up by doing these two stretches as soon as you wake up, suggests New York City podiatrist and foot surgeon Brad Schaeffer, D.P.M., star of My Feet Are Killing Me on TLC. “Lie in bed and spell out the ABC’s with your feet to get the blood pumping,” he says. Next, lean against a wall and do four reps of a calf stretch, holding for 10 seconds each time to stretch from your plantar fascia all the way up to your Achilles tendon and calf.

18

Shore up support.

disabled woman and friend under umbrella in autumn park
Dougal Waters//Getty Images

Building a community — in person or online — is vital for your well-being, especially if you have a disability, says Rhoda Olkin, Ph.D., a professor at the California School of Professional Psychology at Alliant International University: “Move away from people who make you feel bad about yourself and surround yourself with disability- affirmative friends.” It can help build resilience and boost mood.

Advertisement - Continue Reading Below

19

Visit a museum.

mother and daughter in art gallery
South_agency//Getty Images

People who regularly go on artsy outings may have a lower risk of developing depression.

20

Spruce up your smile.

mouth and teeth cleaning
Kubra Cavus//Getty Images

Brushing and flossing each day has multiple benefits for your body and your soul: Not only can taking care of your teeth reduce your risk of heart disease, but when you feel good about your chompers you may smile more, and according to research, just the act of smiling makes you feel happier.

RELATED: The Best Toothpastes, Recommended by Dentists

Headshot of Marisa Cohen

Marisa Cohen is an editor in the Hearst Lifestyle Group’s Health Newsroom, who has covered health, nutrition, parenting and culture for dozens of magazines and websites over the past two decades.

 

preview for Featured Videos From Good Housekeeping US

Advertisement - Continue Reading Below

Advertisement - Continue Reading Below

Advertisement - Continue Reading Below

Source link

AIRWAYS DISORDERS NETWORK

Asthma and COPD Section

Remodeling of airways and destruction of parenchyma by immune and inflammatory mechanisms are the leading cause of lung function decline in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Type 2 inflammation has been recognized as an important phenotypic pathway in asthma. However, its role in COPD has been much less clear, which had been largely associated with innate immune response.1

Activation of Interleukin (IL)-25, IL-33, thymic stromal lymphopoietin [TSLP] produces type 2 cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, either by binding to ILC2 or by direct Th2 cells resulting in elevated eosinophils in sputum, lungs, and blood, as well as fractional exhaled nitric oxide.2 The combined inflammation from this pathway underpins the pathological changes seen in airway mucosa, causing mucous hypersecretion and hyperresponsiveness.

Prior trials delineating the role of biologics, such as mepolizumab and benralizumab, showed variable results with possible benefit of add-on biologics on the annual COPD exacerbations among patients with eosinophilic phenotype of COPD.3

More recently, the BOREAS trial evaluated the role of dupilumab as an add-on therapy for patients with type 2 inflammation-driven COPD established using blood eosinophil count of at least 300/mL at initial screening.4 Dupilumab is a human monoclonal antibody that blocks combined IL-4 and IL-13 pathways with a broader effect on the type 2 inflammation. It included patients with moderate to severe exacerbations despite maximal triple inhaler therapy with blood eosinophilia. Patients with asthma were excluded. This 52-week trial showed reduction in annual moderate to severe COPD exacerbations, sustained lung function improvement as measured by prebronchodilator FEV1, and improvement in patient-reported respiratory symptoms.4 Evaluation of sustainability of these results with therapy step-down approaches should be explored.

Maria Azhar, MD, Section Fellow-in-Training

Abdullah Alismail, PhD, RRT, FCCP, Section Member

Raghav Gupta, MD, FCCP, Section Member

References:

1. Scanlon & McKenzie. 2012.

2. Brussell, et al. 2013.

3. Pavord, et al. 2017.

4. Bhatt, et al. 2023.

CHEST INFECTIONS & DISASTER RESPONSE NETWORK

Disaster Response and Global Health Section

Viral infections frequently cause acute respiratory failure requiring ICU admission. In the United States, influenza causes over 50,000 deaths annually and SARS-CoV2 resulted in 170,000 hospitalizations in December 2023 alone.1 2 RSV lacks precise incidence data due to inconsistent testing but is increasingly implicated in respiratory failure.

Patients with underlying pulmonary comorbidities are at increased risk of severe infection. RSV induces bronchospasm and increases the risk for severe infection in patients with obstructive lung disease.3 Additionally, COPD patients with viral respiratory infections have higher rates of ICU admission, mechanical ventilation, and death compared with similar patients admitted for other etiologies.4

Diagnosis typically is achieved with nasopharyngeal PCR swabs. Positive viral swabs correlate with higher ICU admission and ventilation rates in patients with COPD.4 Coinfection with multiple respiratory viruses leads to higher mortality rates and bacterial and fungal coinfection further increases morbidity and mortality.5

Treatment includes respiratory support with noninvasive ventilation and high-flow nasal cannula, reducing the need for mechanical ventilation.6 Inhaled bronchodilators are particularly beneficial in patients with RSV infection.5 Oseltamivir reduces mortality in severe influenza cases, while remdesivir shows efficacy in SARS-CoV2 infection not requiring invasive ventilation.7 Severe SARS-CoV2 infection can be treated with immunomodulators. However, their availability is limited. Corticosteroids reduce mortality and mechanical ventilation in patients with SARS-CoV2; however, their use is associated with worse outcomes in influenza and RSV.7 8

Vaccination remains crucial for prevention of severe disease. RSV vaccination, in addition to influenza and SARS-CoV2 immunization, presents an opportunity to reduce morbidity and mortality.

Zein Kattih, MD, Section Fellow-in-Training

Kathryn Hughes, MD

Brian Tran, MD

References:

1. Troeger C, et al. Lancet Infect Dis. 2028;18(11):1191-1210.

2. WHO COVID-19 Epidemilogical Update, 2024.

3. Coussement J, et al. Chest. 2022;161(6):1475-1484.

4. Mulpuru S, et al. Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2022;16(6):1172-1182.

5. Saura O, et al. Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther. 2022;20(12):1537-1550.

6. Inglis R, Ayebale E, Shultz MJ. Curr Opin Crit Care. 2019;25(1):45-53.

7. O'Driscoll LS, Martin-Loeches I. Semin Respir Crit Care Med. 2021;42(6):771-787.

8. Bhimraj A, et al. Clin Inf Dis. 2022.

CRITICAL CARE NETWORK

Palliative & End-of-Life Section

For providers caring for critically ill patients, navigating death and dying in the intensive care unit (ICU) with proficiency and empathy is essential. Approximately 20% of deaths in the United States occur during or shortly after a stay in the ICU and approximately 40% of ICU deaths involve withdrawal of artificial life support (WOALS) or compassionate extubation.

This is a complex process that may involve advanced communication with family, expertise in mechanical ventilation, vasopressors, dialysis, and complex symptom management. Importantly, surrogate medical decision-making for a critically ill patient can be a challenging experience associated with anxiety and depression. How the team approaches WOALS can make a difference to both patients and decision-makers. Unfortunately, there is striking variation in practice and lack of guidance in navigating issues that arise at end-of-life in the ICU. One study of 2814 hospitals in the US with ICU beds found that 52% had intensivists while 48% did not.2 This highlights the importance of developing resources focusing on end-of-life care in the ICU setting regardless of the providers’ educational training.

Important elements could include the role for protocol-based WOALS, use of oxygen, selection and dosing strategy of comfort-focused medications, establishing expectations, and addressing uncertainties. This would be meaningful in providing effective, ethical end-of-life care based on evidence-based strategies. While death may be unavoidable, a thoughtful approach can allow providers to bring dignity to the dying process and lessen the burden of an already difficult experience for patients and families alike.

Angela L. Birdwell, DO, MA, Section Chair

Nehan Sher, MD, Section Member

References:

1. Curtis JR, et al. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2012;186(7):587-592.

2. Halpern NA, et al. Crit Care Med. 2019;47(4):517-525.

SLEEP MEDICINE NETWORK

Nonrespiratory Sleep Section

Q: Are there interventions that can be readily implemented to improve sleep quality for hospitalized patients?

Dr. Arora: A patient’s first night in the hospital is probably not the night to liberalize sleep; you’re still figuring out whether they’re stable. But by the second or third day, you should be questioning – do you need vitals at night? Do you need a 4 AM blood draw?

We did an intervention called SIESTA that included both staff education about batching care and system-wide, electronic health record-based interventions to remind clinicians that as patients get better, you can deintensify their care. And we’re currently doing a randomized controlled trial of educating and empowering patients to ask their teams to help them get better sleep.

Q: Does hospital sleep deprivation affect patients after discharge?

Dr. Arora: Absolutely. “Posthospital syndrome” is the idea that 30 days after discharge, you’re vulnerable to getting readmitted – not because of the disease you came in with, but something else. And people who report sleep complaints in the hospital are more likely to be readmitted.

When people are acutely sleep deprived, their blood pressure is higher. Their blood sugar is higher. Their cytokine response and immune function are blunted. And our work shows that sleep deficits from the hospital continue even when you go home. Fatigue becomes a very real issue. And when you’re super fatigued, are you going to want to do your physical therapy? Will you be able to take care of yourself? Will you be able to learn and understand your discharge instructions?

We have such a huge gap to improve sleep. It’s of interest to people, but they are struggling with how to do it. And that’s where I think empowering frontline clinicians to take the lead is a great project for people to take on.

Vineet Arora, MD, MAPP, is the Dean for Medical Education at the University of Chicago and an academic hospitalist who specializes in the quality, safety, and experience of care delivered to hospitalized adults.

Alison Szabo, MD

Lisa Wolfe, MD, Section Member

THORACIC ONCOLOGY & CHEST PROCEDURES NETWORK

Lung Cancer Section

Lung cancer stands as the leading cause of cancer-related deaths globally, with its prevalence casting a long and challenging shadow. The most important risk factor for lung cancer is tobacco use, a relationship strongly substantiated by data. The impact of smoking cessation to reduce lung cancer incidence is underscored by the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), which mandates that smoking cessation services be an integral component of lung cancer screening programs.

However, beneath the surface of this overarching concern lies a web of factors contributing to racial and ethnic disparities in smoking cessation. Cultural intricacies play a pivotal role in shaping these disparities. Despite higher instances of light or intermediate smoking, racially ethnic minority groups in the general population often face greater challenges in achieving smoking cessation, as highlighted by Bacio, et al (Addict Behav. 2014). Adding another layer to this complex scenario is the profound impact of sustained smoking during cancer treatment. Research suggests that for individuals diagnosed with lung cancer, smoking cessation can markedly boost treatment efficacy, reduce the risk of secondary tumors, and even double the chances of survival.1

A study by Harris, et al. delving into the preferences of current smokers within a lung cancer screening setting uncovered noteworthy insights.2 White participants exhibited a fourfold greater likelihood of favoring a digital format for receiving smoking cessation information, while their Black counterparts expressed a preference for face-to-face support, phone assistance, or printed materials.

Moreover, a meta-analysis conducted by Jabari, et al. sheds light on the efficacy of culturally targeted smoking interventions.3 This comprehensive review describes a dual-level approach to tailoring smoking cessation health interventions: surface and deep. Surface adaptations encompass elements like language and imagery, which aim to enhance the acceptability of interventions within specific communities. Simultaneously, deep-tailored elements identify culturally significant factors that can fundamentally influence the behavior of the target population. The findings of this meta-analysis reveal that the integration of culturally tailored components into standard interventions significantly enhances their efficacy in facilitating smoking cessation.

In conclusion, sustained smoking cessation is a crucial element in combating the global burden of lung cancer. Recognizing the importance of individualized approaches in health care, it is imperative to tailor smoking cessation communications and interventions to diverse cultural influences and socioeconomic factors. Culturally tailored smoking cessation programs that account for nuances specific to each community have the potential to significantly enhance their effectiveness. This necessitates a shift towards individualized smoking cessation care, with a targeted focus on increasing cessation rates among racial and ethnic minority groups. In doing so, we take a step closer to a more equitable landscape in the battle against lung cancer.

Stella Ogake, MD, FCCP, Section Member

References:

1. Dresler, et al. Lung Cancer. 2003.

2. J Cancer Educ. 2018;33(5).

3. Addiction. 2023.

Source link

2023-2031] Computer and Gaming Glasses Market Current Trends and Growth  Opportunities

Report Ocean has published a new report on the COPD and Asthma Devices Market in diverse regions to produce a report with more than 250+pages. This market report is an excellent fusion of qualitative and quantitative data emphasizing major industry changes, business and competitor difficulties in gap analysis, and potential new possibilities in the COPD and Asthma Devices Market.

The global market for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and asthma devices is projected to experience substantial growth, with forecasts indicating a rise to $51,628.58 million by 2027, from a baseline established in 2020. This growth reflects a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 4.30% during the forecast period. This comprehensive report delves into the dynamics shaping this market, highlighting the drivers of growth, the challenges faced, and the burgeoning opportunities within the COPD and asthma devices sector.

Request To Download Free Sample of This Strategic Report@  reportocean.com/industry-verticals/sample-request?report_id=AMR1009

Market Overview:

COPD and asthma devices are crucial in the management and treatment of respiratory diseases, providing relief and improving the quality of life for patients. These devices range from inhalers to nebulizers and spirometers, each serving different needs and preferences of patients. The demand for these devices is on an upswing, driven by the rising prevalence of respiratory diseases globally, increased awareness about disease management, and technological advancements in device manufacturing.

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma devices, also known as pulmonary drug delivery devices, are used as a permanent treatment or rescue therapy for respiratory diseases and other related ailments. It is the most advanced mode of drug administration in which the drug is directly delivered to the lungs to provide a systemic effect. COPD and asthma have significant shares in the global respiratory diseases market. According to the Global Health Organization (WHO), in 2016, around 251 million cases of COPD were estimated globally. Thus, a variety of drug-delivery protocols, such as oral and parenteral delivery, are developed for the treatment of COPD and asthma. However, the pulmonary drug delivery system is the most effective treatment option as compared to the other conventional methods.

Growth Drivers and Opportunities:

The primary factors propelling the growth of the COPD and asthma devices market include the increasing global incidence of respiratory diseases such as asthma and COPD, attributed to factors like air pollution, smoking, and changing lifestyle patterns. Additionally, advancements in inhaler technologies, such as smart inhalers equipped with Bluetooth connectivity for monitoring usage and dosing, are anticipated to bolster market growth.

Download Free Sample of This Strategic Report with Industry Analysis@  reportocean.com/industry-verticals/sample-request?report_id=AMR1009

The market is also benefiting from heightened awareness and healthcare initiatives aimed at managing and treating respiratory conditions effectively. Moreover, the advent of portable and user-friendly devices has facilitated the adoption of homecare respiratory therapy, opening new avenues for market expansion.

Challenges:

Despite the optimistic growth trajectory, the COPD and asthma devices market faces several challenges. High costs associated with advanced respiratory devices and treatments can impede accessibility for a significant portion of the patient population, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Moreover, the potential for side effects and complications arising from improper use of these devices remains a concern.

KEY BENEFITS FOR STAKEHOLDERS

– This report entails a detailed quantitative analysis along with the current global antihypertensive market trends from 2019 to 2027 to identify the prevailing opportunities along with the strategic assessment.
– The market size and estimations are based on a comprehensive analysis of key developments in the industry.
– A qualitative analysis based on innovative products facilitates strategic business planning.
– The development strategies adopted by the key market players are enlisted to understand the competitive scenario of the market.

Competitive Landscape:

The leading players profiled in this report include Aerogen, Inc., AstraZeneca PLC, Baxter International Inc., Boehringer Ingelheim International GmbH, 3M COMPANY, GF Health Products, GlaxoSmithKline Plc, Koninklijke Philips N.V., Novartis AG, PARI Medical Holding GMBH, and Smith’s Group Plc.

To Get More Business Strategies For Request Free Sample Report @  reportocean.com/industry-verticals/sample-request?report_id=AMR1009

Factors Affecting the Growth of the COPD and Asthma Devices Industry:

Increasing Prevalence of COPD and Asthma:

The growth of the COPD and asthma devices industry is significantly influenced by the increasing prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma worldwide. COPD and asthma are chronic respiratory conditions characterized by airflow obstruction, inflammation, and respiratory symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath. The global burden of COPD and asthma is substantial, with millions of people affected by these conditions, and the prevalence is projected to rise due to factors such as aging populations, environmental pollution, smoking, and urbanization. As the prevalence of COPD and asthma increases, there is a growing demand for devices and treatments that help manage symptoms, improve lung function, and enhance the quality of life for patients with these respiratory conditions, driving growth in the COPD and asthma devices industry.

Technological Advancements in Respiratory Devices:

Technological advancements play a crucial role in driving growth and innovation in the COPD and asthma devices industry. Manufacturers continually invest in research and development to innovate new respiratory devices and technologies that offer improved efficacy, convenience, and patient adherence. For example, advancements in inhaler devices include the development of dry powder inhalers (DPIs), metered-dose inhalers (MDIs), and soft mist inhalers (SMIs) with features such as dose counters, breath-actuated mechanisms, and compact designs for portability. Similarly, innovations in nebulizer technology include the development of ultrasonic nebulizers and mesh nebulizers that deliver medications more efficiently and with reduced treatment times. Moreover, the integration of digital health technologies, such as mobile apps, smart inhalers, and remote monitoring devices, enhances patient engagement, medication adherence, and disease management for patients with COPD and asthma. As manufacturers introduce advanced respiratory devices and technologies to address the evolving needs of patients and healthcare providers, they stimulate demand and drive growth in the COPD and asthma devices industry.

Healthcare Policy and Reimbursement Landscape:

The growth of the COPD and asthma devices industry is influenced by healthcare policy and reimbursement frameworks governing respiratory devices and treatments. Reimbursement policies set by government payers, private insurance companies, and healthcare systems impact patient access to respiratory devices and treatments and influence healthcare providers’ prescribing decisions. For example, favorable reimbursement rates for inhaler devices and medications may incentivize healthcare providers to prescribe these treatments to patients with COPD and asthma. Additionally, changes in healthcare policies, such as the implementation of value-based care models and initiatives to improve chronic disease management, drive the adoption of respiratory devices and technologies that support patient self-management and remote monitoring. As policymakers and payers prioritize initiatives to improve respiratory health outcomes and reduce healthcare costs associated with COPD and asthma, the COPD and asthma devices industry may experience changes in demand and growth opportunities.

For Further Information Regarding this Report: Request a Free Sample @  reportocean.com/industry-verticals/sample-request?report_id=AMR1009

Market Segmentation:

The report segments the global COPD and asthma devices market by product type (inhalers and nebulizers), disease indication (COPD and asthma), distribution channel (hospital pharmacies, retail pharmacies, and online pharmacies), and geography. It offers an in-depth analysis of each segment, providing insights into market size, growth trends, and future prospects.

Key Market Segments

By Product Type
– Inhalers
o Drug Powder Inhalers (DPIs)
o Metered Dose Inhalers (MDIs)
o Soft Mist Inhalers (SMIs)
– Nebulizers
o Compressor Nebulizers
o Ultrasonic Nebulizers
o Mesh Nebulizers

By Indication
o Asthma
o COPD

By Distribution Channel
o Retail Pharmacies
o Hospitals
o Online Pharmacies

– By Region
o North America
– U.S.
– Canada
– Mexico
o Europe
– Germany
– France
– UK
– Italy
– Russia
– Rest of Europe
o Asia-Pacific
– Japan
– China
– India
– Australia
– Rest of Asia-Pacific
o Middle East
– Saudi Arabia
– Brazil
– Argentina
– Colombia
– Turkey
– Rest of LAMEA

Get 30% Off On Various License Types When Buy Now At @  reportocean.com/industry-verticals/sample-request?report_id=AMR1009

Table of Contents

– Market Summary

– Economic Impact Competition Analysis by Players

– Production, Revenue (Value) by geographical segmentation

– Market Size by Type and Application

– Regional Market Status and Outlook

– Market Analysis and Outlook

– Market Forecast by Region, Type, and Application

– Cost Investigation, Market Dynamics

– Marketing Strategy comprehension, Distributors and Traders

– Market Effect Factor Analysis

– Research Finding/ Conclusion

– Appendix

– Continue……

Some of the Key Aspects that the Report Analyses:

  • Which regions in Market are witnessing rise in investments in the supply chain networks?
  • Which regions have witnessed decline in consumer demand due to economic and political upheavals in Industry?
  • Which countries in Market seem to have benefitted from recent import and export policies?
  • Which are some the key geographies that are likely to emerge as lucrative markets?
  • What are some the sustainability trends impacting the logistics and supply chain dynamics in the Market?
  • What are some of the demographic and economic environments that create new demand in developing economies?
  • Which regions in Market are expected to lose shares due to pricing pressures?
  • Which regions leading players are expected to expand their footprints in the near future in Industry?
  • How are changing government regulations shaping business strategies and practices?

Key Findings Market Reports:

  • Supply Chain Disruptions: Lockdowns, restrictions, and factory closures worldwide disrupted production and movement of goods, initially leading to reduced demand for this industry.
  • Shift in Demand: As consumer demand shifted, industry reports were increasingly used to transport essential goods such as medical supplies, PPE, pharmaceuticals, and groceries, while shipments of non-essential items declined.
  • Container Imbalances: Uneven trade flows and shipping disruptions caused imbalances in container availability, impacting pricing and availability across different regions.
  • Rising Shipping Costs: Increased demand for essential goods and disruptions in trade led to rising freight rates, affecting overall shipping costs and logistics.
  • Maintenance Challenges: Travel restrictions and lockdowns hindered maintenance activities for industry, potentially leading to longer-term maintenance challenges.
  • Supply Chain Resilience: Businesses recognized the need for greater supply chain resilience, leading to discussions and investments in robust container logistics and digital solutions.
  • Digital Adoption: The pandemic accelerated the adoption of digital solutions in logistics and supply chain management, including e-commerce and digital platforms for container booking and tracking.
  • Regulatory Impact: Governments implemented regulations and safety measures affecting shipping practices and container handling, impacting container operations.
  • Vaccine Transportation: Market played a vital role in transporting COVID-19 vaccines and related supplies, highlighting their importance in global health crises.
  • Supply Chain Strategies: Businesses reevaluated supply chain strategies, prioritizing risk mitigation and exploring alternatives for resilience against future disruptions.

Request full Report :- @  reportocean.com/industry-verticals/sample-request?report_id=AMR1009

About Report Ocean:

We are the best market research reports provider in the industry. Report Ocean is the world’s leading research company, known for its informative research reports. We are committed to providing our clients with both quantitative and qualitative research results. As a part of our global network and comprehensive industry coverage, we offer in-depth knowledge, allowing informed and strategic business conclusions to report. We utilize the most recent technology and analysis tools along with our own unique research models and years of expertise, which assist us to create necessary details and facts that exceed expectations.

Get in Touch with Us:
Report Ocean:
Email[email protected]
Address: 500 N Michigan Ave, Suite 600, Chicago, Illinois 60611 – UNITED STATES
Tel:+1 888 212 3539 (US – TOLL FREE)
Website: reportocean.com

Source link

  •  1.9 million people in the UK alone say they experience symptoms of long Covid
  • Scientists found those with long Covid had problems with iron levels in blood

Experts may have found the cause of long Covid after discovering that low iron levels following an infection could be a key trigger.

An estimated 1.9 million people in the UK alone say they experience symptoms of long Covid.

These can include fatigue, shortness of breath, muscle aches and problems with memory and concentration – and last long after the initial Covid infection has subsided.

Now scientists believe that problems with iron levels in the blood – and the body’s ability to regulate this important nutrient – could be a key driver of ongoing issues.

And the discovery could point to possible ways to prevent or treat the condition.

An estimated 1.9 million people in the UK alone say they experience symptoms of long Covid. These symptoms can include fatigue, muscle aches and loss of smell

An estimated 1.9 million people in the UK alone say they experience symptoms of long Covid. These symptoms can include fatigue, muscle aches and loss of smell

Shortly after the start of the pandemic, a team led by Cambridge University began recruiting people who had tested positive for the virus.

Over the course of a year, participants provided blood samples and it became clear that a significant number of patients would go on to have symptoms that persisted.

What is long Covid ?

Most people with Covid feel better within a few days or weeks, but those with long Covid take much longer to recover.

The symptoms include:

Fatigue, shortness of breath, loss of smell and muscle aches.

It can also cause:

Memory problems, a tight chest, insomnia, heart palpitations, dizziness, joint pain, pins and needles, tinnitus, stomach aches, loss of appetite, high temperature, a cough, rashes and depression. 

Source: NHS 

In the end the researchers focused their analysis on 214 individuals, around half of whom reported long Covid symptoms between three and 10 months after their infection.

They discovered that ongoing inflammation and low iron levels in the blood could be seen as early as two weeks following an infection in those individuals reporting long Covid many months later.

Problems with iron levels in the blood were detectable in the long Covid group regardless of age, sex or infection severity, they found.

Dr Aimee Hanson, who worked on the study while at the University of Cambridge and is now at the University of Bristol, said: ‘Iron levels, and the way the body regulates iron, were disrupted early on during SARS-CoV-2 infection, and took a very long time to recover, particularly in those people who went on to report long Covid months later.

‘Although we saw evidence that the body was trying to rectify low iron availability and the resulting anaemia by producing more red blood cells, it was not doing a particularly good job of it in the face of ongoing inflammation.’

Co-author Professor Hal Drakesmith, from the University of Oxford, said iron dysregulation is a natural response to infection.

‘When the body has an infection, it responds by removing iron from the bloodstream,’ he said.

‘This protects us from potentially lethal bacteria that capture the iron in the bloodstream and grow rapidly. It’s an evolutionary response that redistributes iron in the body, and the blood plasma becomes an iron desert.

Researchers discovered that ongoing inflammation and low iron levels in the blood could be seen as early as two weeks following an infection in those individuals reporting long Covid many months later

Researchers discovered that ongoing inflammation and low iron levels in the blood could be seen as early as two weeks following an infection in those individuals reporting long Covid many months later

‘However, if this goes on for a long time, there is less iron for red blood cells, so oxygen is transported less efficiently affecting metabolism and energy production, and for white blood cells, which need iron to work properly. The protective mechanism ends up becoming a problem.’

The findings, published in the journal Nature Immunology, may help explain why symptoms such as fatigue and exercise intolerance are common in long Covid.

The researchers say the study points to potential ways of preventing or reducing the impact of long Covid by rectifying iron dysregulation during early infection.

One approach might be controlling the extreme inflammation as early as possible, before it impacts on iron regulation.

Another approach might involve iron supplementation - however as Dr Hanson pointed out, this may not be straightforward.

‘It isn't necessarily the case that individuals don't have enough iron in their body, it's just that it’s trapped in the wrong place,’ she said.

‘What we need is a way to remobilise the iron and pull it back into the bloodstream, where it becomes more useful to the red blood cells.’

Source link

Study cohorts

This single-center, retrospective observational, case–control study was performed in patients ≥ 18 years old admitted to the ICU of Nagoya University Hospital due to COVID-19 with respiratory failure requiring IMV between January and April 2022 (EMS therapy group) and age-matched controls admitted between March and September 2021 (historical control group) with length of stay > 24 h in the ICU. Patients who died in the ICU, who were not intubated, and who did not receive rehabilitation therapy in the ICU were excluded.

In all patients, COVID-19 diagnosis was confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for SARS-CoV-2 from any specimen. Our clinical setting and management of COVID-19 were reported previously5,18. Management of COVID-19 requiring IMV in the ICU was based on the “ABCDEF (Assess & manage pain, Both spontaneous awakening trials and spontaneous breathing trials, Choice of sedation and analgesia, Delirium assessment & management, Early mobilization and exercise, and Family engagement)” bundle19. Patients requiring < 4 L of O2 were transferred to the general COVID-19 ward. Rehabilitation therapy was performed by a multidisciplinary critical care team. The first stage of rehabilitation performed in patients with Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS) score ≤  − 2 consisted of positioning or range of motion exercises. In patients whose condition stabilized, rehabilitation proceeded to the second stage consisting of sitting on the edge of the bed, standing, transferring to a chair, and active muscle training until discharge from the ICU.

Electrical muscle stimulation

EMS therapy was incorporated into the rehabilitation program in all patients in the EMS therapy group once they had progressed beyond the initial very acute phase after discontinuing neuromuscular blockade. Patients with skin lesions, cardiac pacemakers, infection or trauma of the extremities, those who were unable to walk before hospital admission, and those who could not speak Japanese were excluded from the EMS therapy group. EMS was applied to the bilateral upper and lower limb muscles (biceps brachii, quadriceps femoris, and gastrocnemius muscles: middle of the upper arm and approximately 2 cm above the cubital fossa for biceps brachii, approximately 5 cm below the inguinal fold and 3 cm above the upper patella border for the quadriceps femoris, and approximately 3 cm below the popliteal fossa and immediately above the proximal end of the Achilles tendon for the gastrocnemius muscles) with a stimulator (Solius; Minato Medical Science, Osaka, Japan) using self-adhesive surface electrodes (40 × 80 mm). The EMS intervention included as part of the standard rehabilitation therapy for patients with respiratory or circulatory failure and postoperative patients in the ICU in our institution was reported previously20,21,22. We applied EMS with a variable-frequency train that began with high-frequency bursts (200 Hz), followed by low-frequency stimulation (20 Hz), and EMS was applied as a symmetrical biphasic square wave with 0.4-s pulses of direct current followed by a 0.6-s pause. Pulse groups consisting of 10 impulse trains were delivered to unilateral muscle groups at 10-s intervals during the session, and the output current was adjusted to ensure visible muscle contraction. EMS was applied by trained physiotherapists for 30 min per day, 6 days per week, for up to 2 weeks until the discharge from the ICU. We set the discontinuation criteria during the EMS session as follows: (1) change in systolic blood pressure >  ± 20 mmHg; (2) increase in heart rate >  + 20 beats/min; (3) development of sustained ventricular arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation, and paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia; (4) decrease in blood oxygen saturation > − 4%.

Data collection

The Coronavirus Clinical Characterisation Consortium Mortality Score was calculated for each patient on admission to the ICU23. The worst Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores, both of which were also calculated within 24 h after ICU admission, were used in the analyses. The clinical frailty scale was used to assess the degree of frailty prior to ICU admission, with scores ranging from 1 (very fit) to 9 (terminally ill)24.

Physical function and clinical outcomes

Physical function was evaluated in each patient at the time of discharge from the ICU. Muscle strength was determined based on the Medical Research Council (MRC) sum score, which assesses the strength of each muscle group in the upper and lower limbs with scores for each muscle group ranging from 0 to 5 and higher scores indicating greater muscle strength (total score range: 0 = worst to 60 = best, minimal clinically important difference 4 points)3,25; MRC sum score < 48 points was taken as the definition of muscle weakness26. Handgrip strength was also measured to assess muscle strength with the patient performing two maximal isometric voluntary contractions of each hand for 3 s with the elbow joint fixed at 90° flexion in the supine position using a Jamar dynamometer set to the second handle position (DHD-1 Digital Hand Dynamometer; Saehan Corporation, Seoul, South Korea). The greatest strength expressed as an absolute value (kg) was used in the analyses. The grip and release test and foot tapping test, involving measurement of the number of times the patient could flex and stretch the fingers of each hand in 10 s and tap the sole of each foot in 10 s while keeping the heel in contact with the floor and with the knees at 90° flexion, were performed with the patient in the supine position to evaluate upper and lower peripheral extremity motor function, respectively27,28. The analyses were performed using the highest scores obtained for both grip and release test and foot tapping test.

Clinical outcomes, including length of stay in the ICU, unplanned readmission to the ICU, and the location of hospital discharge (i.e., home or to another department/institution/ward/facility), were included in the analysis. At ICU discharge, we calculated the ICU mobility scale score for each patient determined on an 11-point ordinal scale ranging from 0 (lying/passive exercises in bed) to 10 (independent ambulation). The time taken to first mobilization (defined as ICU mobility scale score ≥ 3, i.e., sitting on the edge of the bed or higher) was assessed29.

Statistical analysis

Continuous variables are expressed as the median and interquartile range (IQR), and categorical variables are expressed as numbers and percentages. Differences between groups were evaluated by the Mann–Whitney U test for continuous variables and Fisher’s exact test for dichotomous variables. The primary outcome was MRC sum score at ICU discharge.

Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS version 23.0 (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY) and R version 3.2.1 (R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria). In all analyses, a two-tailed P < 0.05 was taken to indicate statistical significance.

Ethics approval and consent to participate

This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of Nagoya University Hospital, and was performed in accordance with the tenets of the Declaration of Helsinki and the Japanese Ethical Guidelines for Medical and Health Research Involving Human Subjects. Informed patient consent was obtained, and the patients agreed to reveal their facial photos for academic purposes. All participants were informed that they were free to opt out of participation in the study at any time.

Source link

2023-2031] Computer and Gaming Glasses Market Current Trends and Growth  Opportunities

Report Ocean has published a new report on the Mechanical Ventilator Market in diverse regions to produce a report with more than 250+pages. This market report is an excellent fusion of qualitative and quantitative data emphasizing major industry changes, business and competitor difficulties in gap analysis, and potential new possibilities in the Mechanical Ventilator Market.

The Global Mechanical Ventilator Market has experienced significant growth, expanding from a valuation of $2.94 billion in 2019 to an estimated $12.54 billion by 2027. This report provides an in-depth analysis of the market dynamics, emphasizing the factors contributing to an impressive Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 16.5% during the forecast period from 2020 to 2027. It covers the current market trends, growth drivers, challenges, and potential opportunities within the mechanical ventilator industry.

Request To Download Free Sample of This Strategic Report @ reportocean.com/industry-verticals/sample-request?report_id=AMR1086

Market Overview:

Mechanical ventilators are critical life-support devices used in respiratory failures and other critical care conditions. They are essential in intensive care units (ICUs), emergency departments, and increasingly in home care settings. The demand for mechanical ventilators has surged, particularly highlighted by the COVID-19 pandemic, which significantly stressed healthcare systems worldwide.

Mechanical ventilation is a lifesaving intervention for patients with respiratory disorders or respiratory failure. It is a form of breathing assistance in which a patient is connected to a machine through an endotracheal tube directly applied to the airway or non-invasive (NIV) mask. It is also employed as a diagnostic tool to measure static compliance of airway resistance and irregular functioning of respiratory system. Currently, intensive care and portable mechanical ventilators are the two most widely used ventilators available in the market.

Growth Drivers and Opportunities:

The market’s growth is primarily driven by the increasing incidence of respiratory diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, lung cancer, and other acute respiratory infections. The COVID-19 pandemic has further underscored the vital role of mechanical ventilators in managing severe respiratory conditions, leading to a dramatic increase in demand.

Download Free Sample of This Strategic Report with Industry Analysis @ reportocean.com/industry-verticals/sample-request?report_id=AMR1086

Technological advancements in ventilator design, offering more patient-friendly, portable, and efficient devices, are propelling market growth. Additionally, the aging global population, susceptible to respiratory conditions requiring ventilatory support, and improvements in healthcare infrastructure across emerging economies present significant growth opportunities for the mechanical ventilator market.

Increase in incidences of chronic respiratory diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, bronchitis, and other lung disorders, and rise in number of accidental emergencies lead to substantial requirement of mechanical ventilators. In addition, growth in geriatric population prone to respiratory emergencies is one of the key drivers of the market. Moreover, technological innovations in respiratory care devices, namely, non-invasive ventilation technology and portable mechanical ventilators, further supplement the market growth.

Challenges:

Despite the optimistic growth outlook, the mechanical ventilator market faces several challenges. High costs associated with advanced ventilator systems can limit accessibility in low- and middle-income countries. Furthermore, the complexity of mechanical ventilators requires skilled healthcare professionals for operation and management, posing a challenge in regions facing healthcare workforce shortages.

KEY BENEFITS FOR STAKEHOLDERS

? This report provides a detailed quantitative analysis of the current market trends and future estimations from 2020 to 2027, which assists in identifying prevailing market opportunities.
? An in-depth analysis of various regions is likely to provide a detailed understanding of the current trends to the stakeholders to formulate region-specific plans.
? Comprehensive analysis of factors that drive and restrain growth of the mechanical ventilator market are provided.
? Key regulatory guidelines for the mechanical ventilator market are critically dealt according to region.
? A deep dive analysis of various regions provides insights that would allow companies to strategically plan their business moves.

To Get More Business Strategies For Request Free Sample Report @ reportocean.com/industry-verticals/sample-request?report_id=AMR1086

Competitive Landscape:

– Becton, Dickinson and Company
– Carl Reiner GmbH
– Draegerwerk AG & Co. KGaA
– Getinge AB
– General Electric Company (GE Healthcare)
– Hamilton Medical AG
– Koninklijke Philips N.V.
– Medtronic Plc.
– Mindray Medical International Limited
– Smiths Group Plc.
– Zoll Medical Corporation

Factors Affecting the Growth of the Mechanical Ventilator Industry:

Global Health Emergencies and Pandemics:

The growth of the mechanical ventilator industry is heavily influenced by global health emergencies and pandemics, particularly during outbreaks of respiratory diseases such as COVID-19. During public health crises, there is an increased demand for mechanical ventilators to support patients with severe respiratory failure, including those with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by infectious diseases. The COVID-19 pandemic, in particular, has highlighted the critical role of mechanical ventilators in treating severely ill patients and preventing mortality. The surge in demand for mechanical ventilators during the pandemic has led to increased production, innovation, and investment in the mechanical ventilator industry to meet the growing needs of healthcare systems worldwide. As the frequency and severity of global health emergencies continue to impact healthcare infrastructure and resource allocation, the demand for mechanical ventilators remains a key driver of growth in the industry.

Technological Advancements and Innovation:

Technological advancements and innovation drive growth and competitiveness in the mechanical ventilator industry. Manufacturers continuously invest in research and development to improve the design, functionality, and performance of mechanical ventilators, aiming to enhance patient outcomes, user experience, and safety. Innovations in ventilation modes, such as pressure-controlled ventilation, volume-controlled ventilation, and dual-mode ventilation, offer clinicians greater flexibility and customization in tailoring ventilation strategies to individual patient needs. Moreover, advancements in ventilator monitoring and control systems, including real-time data analytics, remote monitoring capabilities, and integration with electronic health records (EHRs), enable more precise and personalized ventilation management. Additionally, the development of portable and transport ventilators enhances the mobility and flexibility of mechanical ventilation in various healthcare settings, including ambulances, intensive care units (ICUs), and home care settings. As manufacturers continue to introduce innovative features and technologies to meet evolving clinical requirements and regulatory standards, the mechanical ventilator industry experiences sustained growth and technological advancement.

For Further Information Regarding this Report: Request a Free Sample @ reportocean.com/industry-verticals/sample-request?report_id=AMR1086

Regulatory Landscape and Quality Standards:

The regulatory landscape and quality standards governing the manufacturing, distribution, and use of mechanical ventilators significantly impact the growth of the mechanical ventilator industry. Regulatory agencies such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) establish guidelines and standards for the safety, efficacy, and quality of medical devices, including mechanical ventilators. Compliance with regulatory requirements, such as obtaining regulatory approvals or clearances, conducting clinical trials, and maintaining quality management systems, is essential for manufacturers to market their ventilators and ensure patient safety. Additionally, adherence to international quality standards, such as ISO 13485 certification for medical device quality management systems, demonstrates a commitment to quality and regulatory compliance. As regulatory requirements evolve and become more stringent, manufacturers invest in regulatory affairs and quality assurance processes to ensure compliance and market access for their mechanical ventilator products.

Market Segmentation:

The report segments the global mechanical ventilator market by product type (critical care ventilators, neonatal ventilators, portable ventilators, and others), mode (invasive and non-invasive), end-user (hospitals, ambulatory surgical centers, home care, and others), and geography. It provides a comprehensive analysis of each segment, detailing current market sizes, growth trends, and future projections.

KEY MARKET SEGMENTS
By Product Type
– Intensive care unit/critical care
– Transport/portable/ambulatory
– Neonatal care

By Component
– Devices
– Services

By Mode
– Non-invasive ventilation
– Invasive ventilation

By Age Group
– Pediatric & neonatal
– Adult
– Geriatric

By End User
– Hospital and clinic
– Home care
– Ambulatory surgical center
– Others

By Region
– North America
o U.S.
o Canada
o Mexico
– Europe
o Germany
o France
o UK
o Italy
o Spain
o Rest of Europe

Get 30% Off On Various License Types When Buy Now At @ reportocean.com/industry-verticals/sample-request?report_id=AMR1086

Table of Contents

– Market Summary

– Economic Impact Competition Analysis by Players

– Production, Revenue (Value) by geographical segmentation

– Market Size by Type and Application

– Regional Market Status and Outlook

– Market Analysis and Outlook

– Market Forecast by Region, Type, and Application

– Cost Investigation, Market Dynamics

– Marketing Strategy comprehension, Distributors and Traders

– Market Effect Factor Analysis

– Research Finding/ Conclusion

– Appendix

– Continue……

Some of the Key Aspects that the Report Analyses:

  • Which regions in Market are witnessing rise in investments in the supply chain networks?
  • Which regions have witnessed decline in consumer demand due to economic and political upheavals in Industry?
  • Which countries in Market seem to have benefitted from recent import and export policies?
  • Which are some the key geographies that are likely to emerge as lucrative markets?
  • What are some the sustainability trends impacting the logistics and supply chain dynamics in the Market?
  • What are some of the demographic and economic environments that create new demand in developing economies?
  • Which regions in Market are expected to lose shares due to pricing pressures?
  • Which regions leading players are expected to expand their footprints in the near future in Industry?
  • How are changing government regulations shaping business strategies and practices?

Key Findings Market Reports:

  • Supply Chain Disruptions: Lockdowns, restrictions, and factory closures worldwide disrupted production and movement of goods, initially leading to reduced demand for this industry.
  • Shift in Demand: As consumer demand shifted, industry reports were increasingly used to transport essential goods such as medical supplies, PPE, pharmaceuticals, and groceries, while shipments of non-essential items declined.
  • Container Imbalances: Uneven trade flows and shipping disruptions caused imbalances in container availability, impacting pricing and availability across different regions.
  • Rising Shipping Costs: Increased demand for essential goods and disruptions in trade led to rising freight rates, affecting overall shipping costs and logistics.
  • Maintenance Challenges: Travel restrictions and lockdowns hindered maintenance activities for industry, potentially leading to longer-term maintenance challenges.
  • Supply Chain Resilience: Businesses recognized the need for greater supply chain resilience, leading to discussions and investments in robust container logistics and digital solutions.
  • Digital Adoption: The pandemic accelerated the adoption of digital solutions in logistics and supply chain management, including e-commerce and digital platforms for container booking and tracking.
  • Regulatory Impact: Governments implemented regulations and safety measures affecting shipping practices and container handling, impacting container operations.
  • Vaccine Transportation: Market played a vital role in transporting COVID-19 vaccines and related supplies, highlighting their importance in global health crises.
  • Supply Chain Strategies: Businesses reevaluated supply chain strategies, prioritizing risk mitigation and exploring alternatives for resilience against future disruptions.

Request full Report :-  @ reportocean.com/industry-verticals/sample-request?report_id=AMR1086

About Report Ocean:

We are the best market research reports provider in the industry. Report Ocean is the world’s leading research company, known for its informative research reports. We are committed to providing our clients with both quantitative and qualitative research results. As a part of our global network and comprehensive industry coverage, we offer in-depth knowledge, allowing informed and strategic business conclusions to report. We utilize the most recent technology and analysis tools along with our own unique research models and years of expertise, which assist us to create necessary details and facts that exceed expectations.

Get in Touch with Us:
Report Ocean:
Email[email protected]
Address: 500 N Michigan Ave, Suite 600, Chicago, Illinois 60611 – UNITED STATES
Tel:+1 888 212 3539 (US – TOLL FREE)
Website: reportocean.com

Source link

The Nocebo Effect by Michael H. Bernstein, Charlotte Blease, Cosima Locher, and Walter A. Brown details the investigation into the nocebo effect, the placebo effect’s evil twin. The authors explain the truths behind “the nocebo effect” and its significance in the modern world, while also discussing previous historical applications.

The United Nations described it as a “once-in-a-lifetime pandemic.” As of this writing, almost three years after COVID-19 was first identified, over 600 million people worldwide have been infected with the disease and millions have died from it. The pandemic has resulted in marked changes to our normal lives and the functioning of society. People adapted to wearing face masks, social distancing, lockdowns, and travel restrictions, among other challenges. Vaccination was heralded as a key strategy in combating COVID-19 and allowing societies to return to a new normal. However, even before the pandemic, hesitancy about being vaccinated was common and often fueled by concerns about side effects. The development of several effective vaccines against COVID-19 was met with some concerns about the long-term safety of the vaccines. The COVID-19 pandemic and the global vaccination campaigns provided a perfect environment for the nocebo effect.

The Nocebo Effect From The Vaccine

Like many medical treatments, people receiving the COVID-19 vaccine are susceptible to the nocebo effect due to negative expectations about vaccine side effects. The first telltale signs of nocebo response came from the initial trials testing the efficacy and safety of the newly developed vaccine. In these vaccine trials, one group of participants received the real COVID-19 vaccine, while another group was injected with saline—a substance that does not have any effect on the body and is used as a placebo control. To determine whether the vaccine protected people against the virus, researchers then compared how many participants from the two groups went on to contract COVID-19. Another important aim of the clinical trials was to establish the safety of the vaccine. To do this, the researchers also examined differences in side effect reporting to see if there were any negative symptoms reported at higher rates in the vaccine group compared to the placebo group.

When these studies were published, additional researchers were able to combine the results of many different vaccine trials to produce a more complete picture of how likely side effects were from the COVID-19 vaccine. Three of these bigger studies combining results from smaller experiments were published in January 2022. They looked at the rate of adverse reaction reporting in the placebo groups of COVID-19 vaccine trials. While the rate of side effects was higher in the real vaccine groups, as would be expected, all three reviews found a large overlap in the types of side effects reported by participants who received the actual vaccine and those who received the placebo injection of saline. For example, the review by Dr. Martina Amanzio and colleagues found that while around 55 percent of those receiving the active vaccine reported a general adverse reaction, the most common symptoms being headaches and fatigue, 42 percent of the placebo group also reported these general symptoms. Similarly, the review by Dr. Julia Haas and colleagues reported that after one dose, 46 percent of participants who received the vaccine reported at least one general adverse reaction, and 35 percent of the placebo group also reported a general side effect. This suggests that a large proportion of side effects cannot be attributed to the vaccine. In fact, one review estimated that the nocebo effect could account for 76 percent of the side effects from the COVID-19 vaccine.

In addition to clinical trials, studies conducted during the rollout of the COVID-19 vaccine to the general public also provide evidence for the role of negative expectations in producing side effects. In one study, participants completed a questionnaire measuring various psychological variables prior to receiving the vaccine, such as worry about COVID-19, expectations for experiencing side effects from the vaccine, perceived sensitivity to medicines, and depression. Of all the factors, expecting to experience an adverse reaction was most strongly associated with experiencing side effects later. In a similar study, the more hesitant people felt about having the second vaccine dose, the more side effects they reported after the booster shot six months later. These findings may be due to the nocebo effect, but it might also be that people who genuinely react more to the active ingredient in vaccines feel more hesitant about being vaccinated. However, research has shown that believing you are sensitive to the effects of medicines means you do experience more side effects, even from a placebo tablet.

Researchers have examined the impact of COVID-19 policies on side effect reporting, in particular the move from voluntary vaccination to it being a mandatory requirement for social engagement, as happened in some countries. It is thought that a lack of personal choice could increase vaccine hesitancy and side effect concerns, thereby exacerbating the nocebo effect. This was the case when France introduced a vaccine mandate requiring members of the public to be double vaccinated in order to enter certain public spaces, such as cafes and shops. The proportion of people reporting side effects from the vaccine increased from 34 percent prior to the mandate to 57 percent after it was implemented, suggesting that feeling pressured to be vaccinated can contribute to nocebo effects. Due to our ever-evolving understanding of COVID-19 and the vaccines, some of the trends seen are likely to be a result of the nocebo effect and some may be from other causes.

The Media And The Nocebo Effect

The word “unprecedented” has been frequently used to describe the COVID-19 pandemic. People have found themselves trying to function in an uncertain and ever-changing environment, and the media has played a significant beneficial role with its ability to communicate public health information rapidly to a wide audience. However, the media also mirrors public reaction and anxiety, which has been reflected in dramatic and negative information about the pandemic on news and social media. In discussing COVID-19 vaccination, the media focused heavily on rare side effects, such as blood clots from the AstraZeneca vaccine (which have a 0.0004 percent chance of occurring) or myocarditis from the Pfizer vaccine (0.003 percent chance). Such media coverage increased the public’s worry about vaccine side effects. This attention on side effects can impact people’s negative expectations and exacerbate the nocebo effect from the COVID-19 vaccine, as was the case in New Zealand.

On August 30, 2021, the New Zealand government’s Ministry of Health released a statement that a woman had died after receiving the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine. The death was attributed to the rare side effect myocarditis, an inflammation of the heart wall that is characterized by chest pain, shortness of breath, and an abnormal heartbeat. New Zealand print, television, and radio media platforms discussed this case and encouraged people to be vigilant for cardiac symptoms following vaccination. There were two further deaths in New Zealand from myocarditis, one in December 2021 and another in April 2022, which again received substantial media attention. While myocarditis is a serious side effect of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine, it is rare. A study from Israel found that 2.7 people per 100,000 vaccinated experienced myocarditis following the Pfizer vaccine. However, the symptoms of myocarditis, such as chest pain and shortness of breath, are not uncommon in the general population. Population surveys show that in an average week, around 13 percent of people experience breathing problems and 7 percent experience chest pain and 7 percent experience heart palpitations that cannot be attributed to a particular cause. Consequently, media attention on myocarditis and its symptoms might cause people to overestimate its prevalence, resulting in them misattributing everyday symptoms to the vaccine and reporting them as side effects.

In my research as a health psychologist, I have investigated the effect mainstream media coverage can have in exacerbating the nocebo effect. The case of the New Zealand media linking myocarditis to the COVID-19 vaccine seemed to me like a prime situation for the nocebo effect to occur. Using publicly available data on vaccine side effects reported to the New Zealand Centre for Adverse Reaction Monitoring (CARM), I investigated whether the reporting of the three symptoms mentioned in the media (chest discomfort, breathing problems, and altered heart rate) increased following the media coverage. I looked at the reporting rates per 100,000 vaccinations in the seven months prior to the news coverage on myocarditis, and compared this with the reporting rate in the nine months after the first news item in August 2021. 

Prior to the media attention on vaccine-induced myocarditis, CARM received an average of 35 reports of chest pain per 100,000 vaccinations. After the media coverage, this increased considerably, to 220 reports. A similar change was seen for breathing problems, which went from 25 to 113 reports, and for heart rhythm symptoms, which increased from 34 to 133 reports. To provide further evidence that it was the media’s focus on these particular side effects that was responsible for this change, I also examined the reporting rate of three control side effects that had not received media attention: musculoskeletal pain, numbness, and fever. The reporting of these side effects did not change that much. For example, musculoskeletal pain went from 41 reports per 100,000 vaccinations before the coverage to 52 reports after.

The symptoms of myocarditis mentioned in the media are also common symptoms of anxiety. It is possible that news stories on deaths attributed to myocarditis provoked concerns about the safety of the vaccine, with the symptoms of chest pain, heart rate, and breathing problems attributed to the vaccine being due to anxiety instead. Prior to the alarmist media coverage, CARM received an average of 15 reports of anxiety per 100,000 vaccinations, which increased to 73 reports following the news items. What’s more, statistical analyses showed that the experience of anxiety was significantly associated with greater attribution of chest pain, breathing problems, and changes in heart rate to the vaccine. This shows that anxiety was responsible for some of the increase in side effects.

In addition to the individual symptoms, the actual cardiac condition myocarditis could be reported to CARM. Prior to the media coverage, myocarditis had an average rate of 0.6 reports per 100,000 vaccinations. After the media coverage described this condition and linked it to the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine, the reporting rate increased to 11 per 100,000. While 11 as a total number might sound small, it represents an increase of 1,700 percent. This significant increase in myocarditis could be a genuine vaccine response, or it might be due to self-diagnosis. Anyone in New Zealand can submit a medicine adverse reaction report to CARM. Community doctors typically submit around 65 percent of reports, but in the case of the COVID-19 vaccine, they were responsible for only 13 percent. This suggests that a large number of reports of myocarditis came directly from members of the public, who may have interpreted their chest or breathing symptoms as being myocarditis rather than considering other explanations, such as anxiety.

Taken together, these results suggest that a nocebo effect did occur following the media attention on vaccine-induced myocarditis. It is likely that the media coverage, which discussed a death linked to the vaccine and the symptoms of myocarditis, influenced people’s expectations for side effects, prompted greater attention to symptoms, and led to the misattribution of these to the vaccine. These symptoms are frequently experienced in the general population, and it is possible that media attention influenced people’s perceptions and attribution of these common symptoms. This is supported by the fact that the symptoms the media specifically warned about (chest pain, breathing problems, and heart rate changes) saw a sudden increase in reports to CARM, while side effects that did not receive media attention did not see a substantial change in the number of reports. The changes in the cardiac and breathing symptoms could be due to increased anxiety, as concerns about COVID-19 have already been shown to be associated with experiencing a greater number of unexplained physical symptoms.


          The Nocebo Effect is the result of the collaboration of a litany of brilliant authors. Micheal H. Bernstein is an experimental psychologist who focuses on harnessing the placebo effect to reduce opioid use among pain patients. Charlotte Blease is a philosopher and interdisciplinary health researcher who writes about the ethics of placebo and nocebo effects. Cosima Locher is a psychologist and researcher dedicated to studying honest placebos. Finally, Walter A. Brown is a Clinical Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry and Human Behavior who has studied the placebo effect for the past 40 years.

Relevant reading

The Nocebo Effect

We are just discovering the power behind The Nocebo Effect, as explored in the groundbreaking work of a dozen top level researchers. Most importantly, researchers have investigated strategies that can be adopted by both clinicians and patients to reduce the nocebo effect.

Shop Now

Source link



Health experts debunk TikTok's mystery virus myth

Technology


Say social media spreads misinformation






(Web Desk) - Amid growing concerns shared across social media platforms like TikTok, individuals are reporting symptoms akin to a "mystery virus," characterized by nausea, faintness, excess mucus, and other COVID-like symptoms such as difficulty breathing, extreme fatigue, and fever.

These accounts come from users who state they have tested negative for known viruses such as COVID-19, flu, and RSV. Public health experts, however, suggest that the fear surrounding this so-called mystery virus is more reflective of post-pandemic anxiety rather than the emergence of a new pathogen.

Experts debunk the mystery virus myth

Marcus Plescia, the Chief Medical Officer of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, highlighted to The Hill that the reported symptoms are consistent with various existing viruses, including the common cold.

The symptoms that are being described are pretty consistent with, you know, a lot of viruses that are not 'mystery viruses,' that are things that are out there circulating all year,

Plescia remarked, aiming to alleviate concerns about an unknown virus spreading.

George Benjamin, Executive Director of the American Public Health Association, echoed this sentiment, noting the expected rise in respiratory infections during the colder seasons, especially following years of pandemic-induced isolation.

Benjamin pointed out that with more in-person socializing, a broader spread of infections is likely, a situation exacerbated by the prolific sharing of personal health concerns on social media platforms.

Indeed, social media has become a double-edged sword in the dissemination of health information. On one hand, it allows for the rapid sharing of symptoms and experiences, but on the other, it can fuel hysteria and spread misinformation.

The spread of health misinformation is not a new challenge but has been highlighted during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Callum Hood, Head of Research at the Center for Countering Digital Hate, criticized social media platforms for failing to address health misinformation effectively.

 

' ;
var i = Math.floor(r_text.length * Math.random());
document.write(r_text[i]);

Source link

It’s been seven months since Patrick Hobart contracted COVID-19 and he still remembers being scared he would die in his sleep.

Hobart had the sensation of not being able to get enough air, especially at night, so he stayed up — afraid he’d stop breathing if he let himself doze off.

He was seriously ill for 10 days in March, complete with a high fever and other coronavirus warning signs, but was never hospitalized.

Hobart’s symptoms eventually went away, but the night can still come with terrors.

“Even to this day, I still have some anxiety about sleeping,” Hobart, a 41-year-old web developer who lives in Fairfield, Connecticut, told TODAY.

“While I'm lying down, I get this involuntary gasp for air… all of a sudden, it's like my body shoves air down my throat.”

He’s not alone. Half of patients recovering from COVID-19 reported difficulty sleeping as one of the lingering symptoms in a survey of more than 1,500 people in the Survivor Corp Facebook group (a resource for COVID-19 survivors with over 100,000 members). About 16% reported sleeping more than normal. Members of the group are sometimes called “long-haulers” because they discuss long-term effects of the disease.

Dr. Meir Kryger, a sleep researcher and professor at the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut, has seen patients with several types of “really significant” long-hauler symptoms related to sleep. Most survivors were never sick enough with COVID-19 to be hospitalized, but still struggle with long-term psychological and physiological issues.

Related:

Some develop severe insomnia — a fear of falling asleep because they think something horrible is going to happen to them, similar to what Hobart experienced.

One patient even ended up with severe depression and became suicidal months after his initial bout with COVID-19 because of his underlying fear of dying in his sleep, Kryger said. He likened the psychological impact to post-traumatic stress disorder, but with different symptoms.

Some COVID-19 survivors wake up short of breath and have low blood oxygen, indicating chronic respiratory symptoms after the initial disease. Others appear to have developed an abnormality in their central nervous system.

“I think what they have is a problem in the way their brain is controlling their breathing during sleep. In those patients, the virus has interfered with the normal control of breathing,” Kryger noted.

“We don't have enough medical literature yet to understand what is going on with these patients.”

It reminded Kryger of his experience as a physician in the intensive care unit during the early days of HIV, when it wasn’t known how that virus worked and what its full consequences were.

During the current crisis, doctors have been discovering that besides damaging the lungs, the new coronavirus can also impact the heart, kidneys, the brain, the nervous system and the vascular system.

'Like you're drowning'

When it affects sleep, a person’s entire life can be disrupted.

Franco, who asked that his last name not be used in this article for privacy reasons, is an academic in Boston who had a suspected case of COVID-19 in March. He tracked his blood oxygen levels for months because of the frightening nights he experienced during the initial course of the disease.

“When I fell asleep or started to fall asleep, it felt like I would stop breathing and my body would kick awake and I'd be gasping for air,” Franco, 37 recalled about a two-week period this spring.

“It felt like you were drowning… it's terrifying.”

He was never hospitalized, but he enrolled in a sleep study and wore a pulse oximeter on his own. A normal reading is usually at least 95%, but his blood oxygen levels sometimes dropped into the 80s, and once in the 70s. It rattled Franco, whose father once nicknamed him “Napoleon” for his ability to soundly fall asleep anywhere.

He only stopped wearing the pulse oximeter at night in September and is now sleeping better, but is still not back to normal. Franco felt his brain was “basically kind of like shot” for four months. He was always worried and tired.

Hobart also said his brain hasn’t been functioning at the same capacity as it was before he contracted COVID-19. He feels he hasn’t had a good night’s rest in a long time, has been “living pretty tired” and waking up later than he normally would.

Related:

It’s another long-hauler symptom Kryger is seeing in his sleep clinic: Some patients develop brain fog, weakness, fatigue and sleepiness during the day that isn’t well understood yet.

“We don't know whether the brain fog is there because there’s something that has been damaged in the nervous system. Or do they have a sleep disorder where they're not sleeping as much and therefore the brain fog is really a manifestation of severe sleepiness?” Kryger said.

“Right now we just don't have all of the answers.”

Patients can be treated with oxygen, if that’s what the issue is. If they have central sleep apnea — where the brain temporarily stops sending signals to the muscles that control breathing — a CPAP machine that keeps the airway open can help treat the problem.

Those who develop a fear of falling asleep, but don’t actually have low blood oxygen at night or never stop breathing, may benefit from psychiatric counseling.

Kryger keeps watching COVID-19 survivors in his sleep clinic, trying to understand what happens to the body in the long term.

“I look at sleep as kind of the canary in the mine,” he said. “Sleep is a very early indicator that there's something wrong… there are a lot of important lessons to be learned about COVID.”

Source link

LOS ANGELES, CA - DECEMBER 30: Drive thru COVID-19 testing administered by Total Testing Solutions (TTS) in front of White Memorial Medical Center in Boyle Heights on Thursday, Dec. 30, 2021 in Los Angeles, CA. The long-feared winter coronavirus wave reached new heights Thursday as Los Angeles County reported more than 20,000 new cases, fueled in part by the highly transmissible Omicron variant that is washing over the region. (Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)

A healthcare professional with Total Testing Solutions stands under an umbrella in the rain at a drive-through coronavirus testing site in front of White Memorial Medical Center in Boyle Heights on Thursday. (Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)

With California's coronavirus surge worsening, the state has issued new recommendations for when people infected with the virus can end their isolation, guidance that is stricter than what was made earlier this week by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

California is now recommending that asymptomatic, coronavirus-infected people can exit isolation after the fifth day following a positive test, but only if they get a negative test result.

By contrast, the CDC's recommendations don't ask for a follow-up negative test; the CDC only recommends that those ending isolation continue wearing a mask around other people for five additional days.

Dr. Robert Wachter, chair of the UC San Francisco Department of Medicine, praised California's stricter guidelines. "Kudos," Wachter wrote. "Safer than [CDC's] version."

The move comes as the Omicron surge is reaching new highs.

Los Angeles County on Thursday reported more than 20,000 new cases, fueled in part by the highly transmissible Omicron variant.

Overall, California’s reported average daily coronavirus caseload has more than quadrupled in the last two weeks — an astonishing rise that has pushed infection levels significantly higher than during the summer surge linked to the Delta variant.

“The risk for virus transmission has never been higher in our county,” Los Angeles County Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer said Thursday.

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health endorsed California's new isolation recommendations and will codify them in its latest local mandatory health order.

The new California recommendations still largely mirror the CDC's guidelines. Both shorten the minimum time recommended for isolation from 10 days to five for asymptomatic people.

Both the CDC and California also suggest the quarantine of people who are not up-to-date on their booster shots if they have been exposed to someone who tests positive for the coronavirus.

Officials recommend calling 911 if you have difficulty breathing, chest pain or pressure on the chest; bluish lips or face; are confused or hard to wake; or have other emergency symptoms.

The Omicron variant is believed to be two to four times as contagious as the previously dominant Delta. People who are eligible for booster shots but haven't yet received them are at increased risk for infection.

"Data from South Africa and the United Kingdom demonstrate that vaccine effectiveness against infection for two doses of an mRNA vaccine is approximately 35%. A COVID-19 vaccine booster dose restores vaccine effectiveness against infection to 75%," the CDC said in a statement.

Here's a summary of California's new guidelines to exit isolation:

If you test positive for the coronavirus:

  • Stay home for at least five days after the onset of symptoms or after you were tested, regardless of vaccination status, even if you have no symptoms.

  • After the fifth day, you can exit isolation if a test shows you are negative, and you have no symptoms or symptoms are resolving. (Officials recommend getting a rapid antigen test for this purpose, as PCR tests — which require saliva or nasal swabs be sent to a lab for processing and take a day or two to get results — are so sensitive that they can show a positive test result for several months, long after you've stopped being contagious.)

  • These state guidelines will be requirements in L.A. County. "You can't be a 'positive' person and decide on Day 6, you're leaving isolation in L.A. County. You can leave if you've had a negative test on Day 5, you're asymptomatic or your symptoms have dramatically improved, and you're fever-free," Ferrer said.

  • If you can't get a test or choose not to test, you can exit isolation after the 10th day, as long as you have no symptoms or the symptoms are resolving.

  • If a fever is present, stay isolated until the fever resolves.

  • If symptoms other than fever are not resolving, continue to isolate until symptoms resolve or until after the 10th day.

  • Wear a well-fitting mask around other people for 10 days, especially indoors. Surgical masks or higher-grade masks, such as N95, KN95 and KF94, are recommended.

  • Cooperate with local contact tracing staffers with your local health department, who will notify people you've been around while you were infectious.

If you've been exposed but haven't fallen ill or tested positive:

Recommendations on how to act following an exposure to someone who tests positive for the coronavirus differ depending on your vaccination status and whether you're up-to-date on booster shots.

If you're recently vaccinated or had a booster shot and you've been exposed:

  • Get tested on the fifth day after being exposed to a coronavirus-positive person.

  • Wear a well-fitting mask such as an N95, KN95 or KF94 around others for 10 days, especially indoors.

  • If you test positive, follow isolation recommendations.

  • If symptoms develop, test and stay home.

If you're unvaccinated or haven't been boosted and have been exposed:

  • Stay home for at least five days after your last contact with a person who has tested positive for the coronavirus.

  • Test on the fifth day.

  • The quarantine can end after the fifth day if symptoms are not present and a test taken on the fifth day or later is negative.

  • If you're unable to test or choose not to and have no symptoms, the quarantine can end on the 10th day.

  • Wear a well-fitting mask around others for 10 days, especially inside.

  • If you test positive, follow the isolation recommendations.

  • If symptoms develop, test and stay home.

Vaccinated people are eligible for booster shots six months after their second dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna shots, and two months after the primary dose of the Johnson & Johnson shot.

A close contact is when someone has spent at least 15 minutes over a 24-hour period within six feet of someone who has tested positive for the coronavirus.

What does it mean to stay at home during isolation?

  • Stay home except to get medical care.

  • Get food delivered to you or have someone drop off food.

  • Don't have visitors.

  • Wear a face covering around others, including family members and housemates.

  • Disinfect a shared bathroom after each use, or use a separate bathroom if possible.

  • Open windows if you must be in a shared space.

  • Stay at least six feet away from other people, especially higher-risk people such as those 65 and older; are severely overweight; have a chronic disease such as cancer, diabetes and heart or lung disease; or have a weak immune system.

This story originally appeared in Los Angeles Times.



Source link

Published: Mon 4 Mar 2024, 6:00 AM

Doctors in the UAE are highlighting at least a 10 per cent surge in patients seeking medical attention for persistent coughs.

They said weather fluctuations commonly act as triggers for conditions such as asthma, allergies, and bronchitis, leading to an escalation in chronic cough during these changes.

Medics explained chronic cough often stems from respiratory issues like asthma, Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pulmonary fibrosis, bronchiectasis, and various other respiratory causes.

Stay up to date with the latest news. Follow KT on WhatsApp Channels.

Dr Jimmy Joseph, Specialist Internal Medicine and Diabetologist, Aster Clinic, International City said, “There is a surge in cases of cough. I get to see 8-10 patients daily in OPD with disturbing coughs lasting more than 10 days. We see persistent coughs greater than three weeks with nearly 20-30 per cent of daily cases. Persistent cough means when the cough lasts between three to eight weeks.”

Dr Jimmy Joseph

Dr Jimmy Joseph

Acid reflux-induced cough

Even Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition where stomach acid regularly flows back into the esophagus, irritating the lining. When this acidic fluid reaches the throat and respiratory tract, it can lead to irritation and trigger a cough.

“Causes include post viral/ post-infective cough, postnasal drip, GERD/ acid reflux, asthma, and smoking. Other causes include chronic bronchitis/COPD, Covid 19 and post-infection, ACE inhibitors (blood pressure medication), congestive heart failure, and lung cancer,” he added.

Medics stressed the substantial increase in cough cases can be attributed significantly to the changing seasons, the flu, influenza, cold weather, rain, and dust.

“Patients should approach a doctor when a cough lasts more than 7-10 days, a person loses weight rapidly, coughs out blood, has continuous fever, night sweats, chest pain, and shortness of breath. If your doctor prescribes an antibiotic, complete the full antibiotic course. Avoid OTC medications,” Joseph added.

Dr Bassam Abdelmonem, consultant Emergency Care with Prime Hospital, also reiterated that they’ve recently observed an increased number of patients with chronic coughs.

Dr Bassam Abdelmonem

Dr Bassam Abdelmonem

He said, “Around 10 per cent of patients visiting the Emergency Room (ER) present themselves with chronic cough. Weather changes are common asthma triggers; allergies and bronchitis then chronic cough will increase by these changes. Patients with chronic cough should seek medical advice when they have had a cough for more than three weeks persistently or they're losing weight for no reason. Other reasons include if one has a weakened immune system – for example, because of chemotherapy or diabetes.”

Multiple underlying causes

They emphasised determining the cause of chronic cough is crucial to effective treatment. In many cases, more than one underlying condition may cause a chronic cough.

Healthcare professionals pointed out a persistent cough sometimes goes beyond being a mere inconvenience, as it can disrupt one’s sleep and lead to feelings of exhaustion. In more severe instances, chronic coughing may induce vomiting and dizziness, and even rarely result in rib fractures.

Dr Zaid Mahdi Mohammed, Canadian Specialist Hospital Dubai, said, “The most common causes of chronic cough are postnasal drip, asthma, and acid reflux from the stomach. These three causes are responsible for up to 90 per cent of all cases of chronic cough. Honey and saltwater gargling, using a humidifier, or taking steam can be some of the effective home remedies.”

Dr Zaid Mahdi Mohammed

Dr Zaid Mahdi Mohammed

ALSO READ:

Source link

Health Charité Professor

Patients with Long Covid “not well cared for, or not cared for at all”

Status: 01.03.2024 | Reading time: 2 minutes

A Long Covid patient does breathing training in a rehabilitation clinic

Source: dpa

You can listen to our WELT podcasts here

In order to display embedded content, your revocable consent to the transmission and processing of personal data is necessary, as the providers of the embedded content require this consent as third party providers [In diesem Zusammenhang können auch Nutzungsprofile (u.a. auf Basis von Cookie-IDs) gebildet und angereichert werden, auch außerhalb des EWR]. By setting the switch to “on”, you agree to this (revocable at any time). This also includes your consent to the transfer of certain personal data to third countries, including the USA, in accordance with Art. 49 (1) (a) GDPR. You can find more information about this. You can revoke your consent at any time using the switch and privacy at the bottom of the page.

Those suffering from Long Covid are often chronically exhausted. The head of the Charité’s immunodeficiency clinic complains about the lack of support for these patients. Many of the seriously ill are complete nursing cases.

A good four years after the first Berlin corona patient was admitted to the Charité, according to Charité professor Carmen Scheibebogen, the support for Long Covid patients still leaves a lot to be desired. “The majority of those affected have so far not been well cared for, if not at all,” said the doctor at the university clinic. Disc arch runs the immunodeficiency clinic there.

Long Covid refers to complaints that persist beyond the acute phase of the illness of four weeks or that then appear again. Post Covid describes the clinical picture more than twelve weeks after the corona infection. The symptoms are very inconsistent. The patient guidelines cover things like shortness of breath and coughing, tiredness, sleep disorders, exhaustion, but also worries and sadness.

Prof. Dr. Carmen Scheibenbogen, Charité

Source: dpa

Scheibebogen has been researching myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) for a long time – one of the most serious long-term consequences of Long Covid. What is characteristic of this disease is that the condition worsens significantly after little exertion.

Many of the seriously ill patients are completely in need of care, said the scientist. Often there is no improvement even after many months. “Our studies also show this. If you have ME/CFS after Covid, you will still be just as seriously ill after two years.”

also read

According to the information, the patients in the observational study were “predominantly young people”. According to the doctor, it is not clear how many people in total are affected by ME/CFS. She assumes a high number.

also read

There is now significantly more research being done on the disease than before the pandemic, said Scheibebogen. There are outpatient clinics for long and post Covid across Germany and a number of working groups that deal with this. The Charité professor also heads the National Clinical Study Group (NKSG) on Post Covid and ME/CFS. Several clinical studies are planned or are already underway.

Here you will find content from third parties

In order to display embedded content, your revocable consent to the transmission and processing of personal data is necessary, as the providers of the embedded content require this consent as third party providers [In diesem Zusammenhang können auch Nutzungsprofile (u.a. auf Basis von Cookie-IDs) gebildet und angereichert werden, auch außerhalb des EWR]. By setting the switch to “on”, you agree to this (revocable at any time). This also includes your consent to the transfer of certain personal data to third countries, including the USA, in accordance with Art. 49 (1) (a) GDPR. You can find more information about this. You can revoke your consent at any time using the switch and privacy at the bottom of the page.

This also includes a project in Berlin in which seriously ill people are to be visited at home and examined. The patients should be followed for six months. The study is scheduled to start in the next few months.

At the same time, data should be determined that shows how many people in Germany are affected by Long Covid. “We don’t have that yet.” She assumes that the disease is under-recognized and occurs as frequently as other widespread diseases and can affect between three and five percent of the population, said Scheibebogen. “We don’t know for sure, but it’s a huge problem because it affects so many and severely affects quite a few.”



Source link

Oh, look, Leslie. You were right about another consequence caused by the insane COVID restrictions.

You keep people locked in their homes, refuse to allow them to socialize . . . bad things will happen.

This chart says everything. These people literally have blood on their hands.

I am so mad:

CDC’s Alcohol-Related Disease Impact application was used to estimate the average annual number and age-standardized rate of deaths from excessive alcohol use in the United States based on 58 alcohol-related causes of death during three periods (2016–2017, 2018–2019, and 2020–2021). Average annual number of deaths from excessive alcohol use increased 29.3%, from 137,927 during 2016–2017 to 178,307 during 2020–2021; age-standardized alcohol-related death rates increased from 38.1 to 47.6 per 100,000 population. During this time, deaths from excessive alcohol use among males increased 26.8%, from 94,362 per year to 119,606, and among females increased 34.7%, from 43,565 per year to 58,701. [emphasis added]

But it’s not their fault!

If the government just implements policies that reduce access to alcohol or raise the prices of alcohol, then it won’t happen again!

These people have a lot of nerve.

I have a better idea. How about you not isolate human beings? I’m close to being a hermit but even *I* have to get out of the house occasionally. A conversation here and there in person with another human is nice.

But my gosh, these people wouldn’t even let people go outside.

I have too much respect for Professor Jacobson to say what I want to. But if you follow me on Twitter, you know exactly what is spilling out of my mouth as I write this post.

American Psychological Association: The Risks of Social Isolation. The APA published this study in 2019, a year before the pandemic when loneliness likely affected the elderly much more.

Unfortunately, many more people felt lonely when our masters made us stay home and away from everyone.

There is such a thing as chronic loneliness:

Problems can arise, however, when an experience of loneliness becomes chronic, [Dr. Ami] Rokach notes. “If reactive loneliness is painful, chronic loneliness is torturous,” he says. Chronic loneliness is most likely to set in when individuals either don’t have the emotional, mental or financial resources to get out and satisfy their social needs or they lack a social circle that can provide these benefits, says psychologist Louise Hawkley, PhD, a senior research scientist at the research organization NORC at the University of Chicago.

“That’s when things can become very problematic, and when many of the major negative health consequences of loneliness can set in,” she says.

How many of those people who died from alcohol were alcoholics? Isolation can make it worse for alcoholics or recovering alcoholics.

Humans are social creatures.




DONATE

Donations tax deductible
to the full extent allowed by law.

Source link

Jaipur: The rape survivor who was shot at and brutally attacked by three men in Kotputli-Behror district is still critical and undergoing treatment at Jaipur’s SMS Hospital. She is still on ventilator support as her lungs are not functioning properly.
She has recovered from Covid-19, though, and is maintaining normal blood pressure without support of any medication for blood pressure, while her kidney function has improved as her creatinine level has reduced from 3.5 to 1.7 in seven days of treatment post-surgery of her repair of stomach and other injuries she had suffered in the attack, doctors said.
“She is conscious and is replying by head movement. We were providing her noradrenaline for blood pressure, which we have stopped as she is maintaining her blood pressure,” said Dr Jeevan Kankaria, senior professor (general surgery), who had performed the surgery on the woman.
Doctors have also performed a tracheostomy, in which they created an opening into the trachea for putting a tracheostomy tube for helping her in breathing. Besides, a feeding tube has also been inserted through nose for feeding. “We have started feeding her with liquid diet,” said Dr Kankaria.
Since there is risk of fungal infection due to insertion of tubes for feeding and tracheostomy, the doctors have started antifungal medicine to rule out any such complication. The concern remains the infection in her lungs and the injury to the lungs, due to which she has to be on ventilator support. She is taking 40% of the oxygen by herself, while 60% of the oxygen is being provided through ventilator.

We also published the following articles recently

Docs plan to insert breathing tube to save rape survivor
In Jaipur, doctors at SMS Hospital plan a tracheostomy for a critically injured rape survivor from Kotputli-Behror district. The medical board has repaired her stomach tear, but she also tested positive for Covid-19 and has multiple internal injuries.
Why you should NOT ignore high blood pressure
Ignoring hypertension can have detrimental effects on our health. It can lead to increased pressure on blood vessels, heart disease, complications during pregnancy, stroke risk, vision problems, kidney damage, peripheral artery disease, dementia, and aneurysm.



Source link

For the first time since 2021, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has changed their recommendations about isolation for people with COVID-19, which previously was five days. The new version: stay home if you feel sick whether you tested positive or not, and come back when you're fever-free for 24 hours.

This brings COVID recommendations in line with recommendations for other common respiratory viruses such as influenza (the flu) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).

Here's what that means for you.

How long should I isolate if I have COVID?

The CDC is moving away from diagnoses and testing results and emphasizing symptoms. Instead, it now recommends that if you have the symptoms of a respiratory virus you should stay home until:

  • Your symptoms are improving, and

  • You have not had a fever for at least 24 hours without using fever-reducing medication

If you are at high risk for severe disease from COVID and develop symptoms, you should get tested quickly so you can get Paxlovid and the antiviral Molnupiravir.

Since you still may be contagious, you should also take additional steps for the next five days after you go back to public life such as washing your hands, wearing masks, improving ventilation, physical distancing and testing as needed if you're going to be around other people indoors. If you develop a fever again or your symptoms begin to get worse, isolate again and start over.

Flu, COVID, RSV or a cold? How to tell which symptoms are which and what to do next

What about people with higher risks for serious COVID infections?

Isolation guidance remains the same for groups at higher risk, according to the CDC, including older adults, young children, people with compromised immune systems, people with disabilities, and pregnant people, but the CDC urges additional treatments such as additional vaccines for older adults, people with weakened immune systems and antiviral treatments for people with disabilities. Pregnant people and people who have just given birth should stay up to date with vaccines to protect very young children.

Why did the CDC change its COVID isolation guidelines?

“We're in a different situation,"  CDC Director Mandy Cohen said in a Friday news conference. She said the change reflects progress made in reducing hospitalizations and deaths from COVID over the last two years and the effectiveness of vaccines and treatments.

According to the CDC:

  • COVID-19 vaccines cut the risk of severe disease in half. Over 95% of the adults who were hospitalized last fall were not up to date with their COVID vaccine and boosters.

  • Paxlovid cuts the risk of hospitalization by over half and the risk of death by 75%.

  • Over 98% of the U.S. population now has some protective immunity against COVID-19 from vaccination, prior infection, or both.

  • Weekly hospital admissions for COVID-19 are down more than 75% from the peak of the initial Omicron wave in January 2022, and deaths are down by more than 90%. In 2022, COVID-19 accounted for more than 245,000 deaths. Last year, that number was around 76,000.

  • Complications like multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) are now also less common, and the prevalence of long COVID is also going down.

The change reflects similar updates from California and Oregon and brings COVID isolation in line with other respiratory viruses.

Recent weekly reporting periods indicate nearly 19,000 people are hospitalized and more than 1,000 die from COVID-19 each week. However, Jackson, of the CDC, said COVID-19 figures are now approximately the same as those for the flu and far lower than early in the pandemic.

“These data reinforced that COVID-19 is still an important public health threat, but it is not the emergency that it once was,” Jackson said. “Its health impacts increasingly resemble those of other respiratory virus viral illnesses.”

According to the Florida Department of Health, there have been 117,171 reported cases so far this year as of Feb. 23, and 1,532 deaths. Cases are almost certainly higher as more people are self-testing and not everyone reports it.

Should I still get the COVID vaccine and boosters?

Yes. COVID-19 still poses a significant health threat, especially to those at higher risk, and the CDC recommends everyone stay up to date with vaccines and boosters.

Earlier this week the CDC recommended a booster shot of the latest COVID-19 vaccine for people ages 65 and older.

What about long COVID?

The CDC reported that the "prevalence of Long COVID is also going down."

However, a study last year showed that more than 1 out of every 4 people in Florida who reported a positive COVID test developed lasting COVID symptoms, according to the latest data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

According to the latest Household Pulse Survey from the Census, covering the last two weeks in October 2023, nearly 3 million Floridians reported COVID-19 symptoms that lasted three months or longer. That's 27.6% of the people aged 18 and older in the state who received a positive COVID test or diagnosis from a healthcare provider, the report says.

Anyone infected with COVID-19 can develop long COVID with lingering, long-term effects — fatigue, shortness of breath, coughs, headaches, difficulty thinking clearly and more — and they range from mild to debilitating. Symptoms can last for weeks, months or years.

People at risk of severe respiratory illnesses or who have compromised immune systems, or people who live in the same households with people at risk, may wish to take more stringent protection methods and longer isolation times.

This article originally appeared on The Daytona Beach News-Journal: COVID-19 isolation now when you feel sick, stay fever-free, CDC says

Source link

Reverend Jesse Jackson has been transferred to a rehabilitation facility after spending almost a week in the hospital being treated for COVID-19, his son Jonathan said in a Friday statement. Jackson's wife Jacqueline, who was also hospitalized with COVID last week, has been moved to the intensive care unit.

Jackson, 79, was transferred from Chicago's Northwestern Memorial Hospital to The Shirley Ryan Ability Lab, where he will immediately begin therapy to treat his Parkinson's disease, Jonathan said. He was diagnosed with the degenerative nervous system disorder in 2015, a condition his son says has come more "in focus" as his COVID symptoms have dissipated.

Jacqueline Jackson, 77, was hospitalized with her husband on August 23, but has since been moved to the ICU. Her son said she is not on a ventilator, but is receiving oxygen treatments to help her breathe on her own.

"Both of our parents are continuing to receive excellent medical care," Jonathan said. "We urge that you continue to keep them in your prayers because we know this is a serious disease."

The civil rights leader, who is most widely known for his activism, told Associated Press reporters on Tuesday that he was thankful for the great care he was receiving.

"I'm doing fairly well," Jackson said.

Jackson is fully vaccinated against COVID-19, but Jacqueline has not received any doses due to a pre-existing condition, the AP reported.

In the statement, Jackson's son thanked those worried about his parents and urged everyone to get vaccinated.

"We continue to receive the love that is being poured out to our family from around the world and it is greatly appreciated, as we express our love and concern for the millions of people who have been victimized by the COVID-19 virus and its variants," Jonathan said. "We know this is a dangerous disease so please remain prayerful for all of those who are suffering as a result."

U.S. intelligence community divided on origins of COVID-19

Activists march nationwide for voting rights, commemorating 1963 March on Washington

Louisiana residents prepare for Hurricane Ida as it nears landfall

Source link

In response to the ongoing challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have provided comprehensive guidelines aimed at preventing the spread of respiratory viruses. These guidelines offer practical advice for individuals and organisations to navigate the complexities of illness, recovery, and preventing transmission.

Individuals who suspect they may have a respiratory virus are encouraged to prioritise staying at home and avoiding contact with others, even those within the same household. Symptomatic individuals should remain at home until their symptoms improve and they are fever-free for at least 24 hours without the use of fever-reducing medication. However, caution is advised, as individuals may still be contagious even as symptoms improve, according to CDC. For those who have tested positive for a respiratory virus but remain asymptomatic, the CDC recommends taking added precautions for the next five days. This includes implementing measures such as improved air quality, maintaining rigorous hygiene practices, wearing masks, practicing physical distancing, and considering testing when in close proximity to others indoors. These precautions are particularly crucial to protect individuals from factors that increase their risk of severe illness from respiratory viruses.

The CDC guidelines also emphasise the importance of monitoring symptoms and seeking emergency medical care if experiencing emergency warning signs, such as trouble breathing or chest pain. Organisations are strongly advised to encourage sick individuals to stay home, provide employees with paid time off, and implement flexible leave and telework policies. Additionally, organisations should consider adopting flexible cancellation or refund policies for customers who find themselves ill.

These guidelines provide a framework for both individuals and organisations to navigate the complexities of respiratory virus infections, particularly in the context of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. By following these recommendations, the aim is to reduce transmission, protect vulnerable populations, and contribute to the collective effort to curb the spread of respiratory viruses, the CDC said. (ANI)

(This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

Source link

In a recent medical oversight, a senior patient suffering from coughing and difficulty breathing was misdiagnosed, highlighting a critical gap in routine health assessments. Initially treated for respiratory issues without improvement, the individual's visit to a cardiology center unveiled a starkly different underlying condition.

Uncovering the Oversight

Dr. Abid Hussain, a seasoned cardiologist, discovered the patient's alarmingly high blood pressure, measuring at 240/130, during a basic checkup. An echocardiogram further revealed significant heart dysfunction, a direct consequence of the previously undetected hypertension. The revelation was startling - despite numerous consultations for chest problems, blood pressure checks were consistently overlooked, a lapse that could have led to an earlier diagnosis and potentially averted the progression to heart failure.

The Role of Blood Pressure in Diagnosis

High blood pressure, often a silent threat, can lead to severe health complications if left unchecked. Post-COVID-19 hypertension management emphasizes the importance of regular monitoring to prevent related risks such as heart attacks or strokes. Moreover, comprehensive patient assessments are crucial in diagnosing and treating conditions accurately, underscoring the necessity of thorough evaluations including blood pressure checks.

Manual Blood Pressure Monitoring: A Necessity

The significance of manual blood pressure monitoring cannot be overstated. It offers a cost-effective, interactive, and accurate method for assessing a patient's condition, providing critical data that can inform diagnosis and treatment. As highlighted by the basics of manual blood pressure monitoring, this practice not only aids in identifying hypertension but also helps in validating digital devices and gathering additional diagnostic information, making it indispensable in healthcare settings.

The case of this senior patient serves as a crucial reminder of the fundamental aspects of patient care that should not be neglected. It underscores the importance of routine health checks, such as blood pressure monitoring, in diagnosing and managing health conditions effectively. By revisiting and reinforcing these basic practices, healthcare professionals can ensure better patient outcomes and prevent the dire consequences of overlooked symptoms.



Source link

In effect, the CDC’s new guidelines encourage Americans to take the same approach to Covid as they would to flu or other respiratory illnesses, such as coughs and colds.

US doctors said the change in guidelines reflects a general fall in Covid cases and hospitalisations across the country.

“The change is based on the fact that, according to Dr Cohen, though wastewater analysis for Covid is very high, at the same time, case counts and hospitalisations are MUCH lower,” Dr. Marc Siegel, a professor of medicine at the NYU Langone Medical Center, told Fox News.

“The goal is to have one set of guidelines for all respiratory viruses: flu, RSV, COVID, etc,” he added.

Some US states have already eased their own guidance on Covid in light of the falling case numbers.

Source link

Overview

Each year, respiratory viruses are responsible for millions of illnesses and thousands of hospitalizations and deaths in the United States. In addition to the virus that causes COVID-19, there are many other types of respiratory viruses, including flu and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). The good news is there are actions you can take to help protect yourself and others from health risks caused by respiratory viruses.

Key times for prevention

All of the prevention strategies described in this guidance can be helpful to reduce risk. They are especially helpful when:

  • Respiratory viruses are causing a lot of illness in your community.
  • You or the people around you were recently exposed to a respiratory virus, are sick, or are recovering.
  • You or the people around you have risk factors for severe illness.
  • You may not be aware of the things that can make others more vulnerable to serious illness. Using the core prevention strategies will provide a degree of protection regardless. If you are unsure about the health condition or risk status of those around you, the most protective option is choosing to use additional prevention strategies, like masking, physical distancing, and testing.

Source link