AHMEDABAD: The wavering weather with minimum temperatures going from 13 degrees celsius to 20°C in five days has citizens sick, with physicians and hospitals in the city reporting high prevalence of H1N1 (swine flu) and viral infections such as Covid, Influenza A and B and adenovirus.

H1N1 cases

Dr Pravin Garg, a physician, said it is unusual to have a prolonged viral infection season at the end of Feb.“The changing weather coupled with high frequency of travel due to weddings and other events in Jan and Feb have left many down with viral infection.
“This time around, throat pain is the major symptom that patients come with,” he said. “In some cases, we had to give them pain management medicines.”
Physicians said while the test for H1N1 and other viral infections costs Rs 5,000, treatment with Tamiflu is relatively cheap and provides good results when given at the right time. They added that the medicine must be taken under medical advice and supervision.
Dr Amit Prajapati, a critical care specialist, said that recently two patients were hospitalized with the Influenza A infection. “In both cases, small patches of pneumonia had developed in the lung which prompted hospitalization,” he said.
“Upper respiratory tract infections have been observed in patients for more than one month now. Swine flu cases are also on the rise due to the changing weather. Coughs are a major concern. In a recent case, we had to admit a woman due to 25 days of incessant coughing. In some cases, patients also develop breathing difficulties,” said Dr Nirav Visavadia, a critical care physician. “Those with immunocompromised conditions, asthma and senior citizens should use masks to prevent infection.”
Among children the symptoms are red eyes, runny noses, coughing, body ache and sore throat, experts said. They added that it is not uncommon to get entire families getting infected due to proximity. Those working in closed spaces with air-conditioning are also likely to get infected easily, they added.
It is likely that the city and state may see temperatures rise after the first week of March. Experts say viral infections may abate after that.



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Local physician and owner of Statesboro Urgent Care and The DRIPBaR, Dr. Sreevalli Dega, wants you to be prepared for this season’s three most common viruses: RSV, H1N1, and COVID-19. She shares practical advice and recommendations for managing the ‘triple threat.’

Local physician and owner of Statesboro Urgent Care and The DRIPBaR, Dr. Sreevalli Dega, is warning us about the three most common viruses during this time of year.

The “triple threat” includes Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), H1N1 Influenza, and COVID-19. Certain risk factors can make some people more likely to contract these viruses, experience more serious symptoms, and have more difficulty in recovering.

Preventative measures for this trifecta of viruses include hand washing, vaccination, being mindful of spreading germs, and isolating after coming into contact with a sick person or developing symptoms.

Identifying Symptoms and Risks for Serious Infections

RSV can be contracted by anyone, but it is common in children under 2, and very serious for young and premature babies. Older adults with poor heart and lung health are also at higher risk for contracting the virus. A person can contract RSV more than once in their lifetime.

Mild cases of RSV are similar to the common cold, but serious cases may require hospitalization with oxygen and intravenous fluid treatments. For high risk children under 2, the medicine Synagis (palivizumab) has been approved for prevention of RSV, and you can ask your physician about this.

Common symptoms of RSV in older children and healthy adults include cough, stuffy nose, and low fever which appear 4 to 6 days after catching the virus.

Infants (less than 1 year old), premature babies, and adults who are older than 65 with lung and heart disease may have more serious symptoms. These can include:

  • Runny nose
  • Poor appetite
  • Coughing
  • Fever
  • Sneezing
  • Irritability (in babies)
  • Trouble breathing (shortness of breath, wheezing, rapid breathing)
  • Flaring nostrils as you breathe
  • Bluish skin (due to lack of oxygen)

More serious infections can lead to:

  • Pneumonia
  • Bronchiolitis (lung inflammation)

Various vaccines are approved for infants and adults, with babies born during RSV season (Fall through Spring) recommended to receive one nirsevimab dose.


H1N1, originally known as swine flu, is not the same as seasonal flu. It is a viral infection spread from person to person. The first global outbreak was in 2009.

Symptoms start 3 to 5 days after exposure to the virus. On average, they last about 8 days and commonly include:

  • fever
  • sore throat
  • cough
  • muscle aches
  • headache
  • chills
  • fatigue
  • runny or stuffy nose
  • vomiting
  • diarrhea

Babies and children may have different symptoms.

  • Trouble breathing
  • Fever combined with a rash
  • Confusion or impatience
  • Trouble waking up
  • Not drinking enough fluids
  • Flu-like symptoms that go away and then return with a fever and cough

The flu vaccine has protected against H1N1 since 2010. In general, it’s safe, but there is a chance you may have a reaction. Consult your doctor about vaccination against H1N1, or if you believe you are having symptoms.


COVID-19 can also be contracted by anyone, but is more serious in people with weakened immune systems. COVID-19 symptoms range from mild to severe and can take anywhere from 2 to 14 days after exposure for symptoms to develop. 

Symptoms can differ slightly, based on the variant, but may include some or all of the following:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain or aches
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Runny nose and/or congestion
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea

Available vaccines include Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna, both of which are mRNA vaccines, as well as the Novavax COVID-19 vaccine which is a protein subunit vaccine. If you believe you have contracted COVID-19, you can find out more about no-cost testing centers and at-home testing here.

Follow the links for each individual virus to learn more about symptoms and treatments.

Statesboro Urgent Care is on a mission to become your go-to community urgent care center. Their office is located at 1176 Brampton Avenue in Statesboro.  

They are open:

  • Monday through Friday – 8 am to 8 pm
  • Saturday – 9 am to 5 pm
  • Sunday – 12 pm to 6 pm

Call now to schedule an appointment at 912-259-9474. You can also walk in or schedule an appointment online now by CLICKING HERE.



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Jaipur: In a confirmatory test, former chief minister Ashok Gehlot has tested negative for swine flu, but tested positive for Covid.
He was rushed to Sawai Man Singh (SMS) Hospital on February 2 after being tested positive for Covid and swine flu in a rapid respiratory PCR test.
SMS Hospital doctors collected his samples and sent them for confirmatory test for Covid and swine flu.“He has tested negative for swine flu and tested positive for Covid,” said Dr Achal Sharma, medical superintendent, SMS Hospital.
Doctors treating Gehlot informed him that he is recovering fast and soon will be discharged. Gehlot on X mentioned, “With your well wishes, health has improved compared to before. According to doctors, I will get well soon.”
We also published the following articles recently

Gehlot tests +ve for Covid, swine flu; now stable
Former Rajasthan CM Ashok Gehlot was admitted to Sawai Man Singh (SMS) Hospital with fever and difficulty in breathing after being tested positive for Covid-19 and swine flu. His condition is stable and he may be kept under observation for the next two days.



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JAIPUR: Former Rajasthan CM Ashok Gehlot was admitted to Sawai Man Singh (SMS) Hospital with fever and difficulty in breathing after being tested positive for Covid-19 and swine flu on Friday night.
Gehlot tested positive for swine flu in a private lab test, but SMS Hospital has now sent his samples to its own lab. the report of which was awaited till late Saturday evening.
But his fever had not subsided till afternoon.The doctors have pointed out that his condition is stable, and he may be kept under observation for next two days. Besides, results of all routine tests were found to be normal.



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JAIPUR: Former chief minister Ashok Gehlot was admitted to the Sawai Man Singh (SMS) Hospital with fever and difficulty in breathing after being tested positive for Covid and swine flu on the intervening night of Friday and Saturday.
Gehlot tested positive for swine flu in a private lab test, but SMS Hospital has now sent his samples to its own lab, the report of which was awaited till late Saturday evening.
“Before he was brought to the hospital, his oxygen saturation had dropped below 90% and later it reached 88%-the condition in which not enough oxygen reaches the body tissues. For the past five to seven days, he has been suffering from fever,” said Dr Achal Sharma, medical superintendent, SMS Hospital.
The doctors immediately put him on oxygen support and his oxygen saturation was now maintaining at 95% with mild oxygen supply.
The doctors checked the condition of his lungs by conducting CT scan and X-ray tests and found that the lungs were not compromised or involved due to the infection.
But his fever has not subsided till afternoon. The doctors have pointed out that his condition is stable, and he may be kept under observation for next two days. Besides, results of all routine tests were found to be normal.
SMS hospital superintendent Dr Achal Sharma, senior professor (medicine) Dr Prakash Keswani are other doctors of the hospital are monitoring his health. Gehlot had disclosed his medical condition through X stating that on the advice of the doctors, he had undergone diagnostic tests and found positive for Covid and swine flu. For the next seven days, he would not be able to meet people, he mentioned in the message.



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Jaipur (Rajasthan): Former Rajasthan Chief Minister Ashok Gehlot’s took to X, formerly known as Twitter to announce improvement in his health condition after facing difficulty in breathing.

As per sources, he was admitted to the Sawai Mansingh Hospital due to COVID-19 and swine flu on February 2.

He wrote, “On the night of 2 February, due to COVID and swine flu problem, I had to be admitted to Sawai Mansingh Hospital. Due to the good wishes of all of you, health has improved compared to before. According to doctors, I will get well soon. Thank you all for your good wishes and blessings.”

For the past couple of days, he was under the supervision of senior and trained doctors who investigated his condition and kept him on oxygen support. His social programmes for the upcoming seven days were cancelled due to the illness. However, as per his update, he will recover soon and be back in his office.

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Read More:

  1. Rajasthan: Former CM Ashok Gehlot Detected with Covid
  2. Ashok Gehlot Attacks Assam CM Over FIR Against Rahul Gandhi

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Gehlot hospitalised after he tests positive for Covid & swine flu

Jaipur, Feb 3 (SocialNews.XYZ) Former Rajasthan Chief Minister Ashok Gehlot was admitted to Sawai Mansingh (SMS) Hospital in Jaipur on Saturday after he complained of trouble breathing.

According to doctors, his condition is stable now. Gehlot has been diagnosed positive for Covid-19 and swine flu.




Additional Superintendent of SMS, Dr. Pradeep Sharma said, the former Chief Minister was admitted at around 12 o’clock in the night. The doctors got him examined. A team of other senior doctors is also looking after him.

Doctors said- When Gehlot was brought to the hospital late at night, his oxygen saturation level was found to be down in his preliminary examination. When this level was between 85-90, he was asked to get admitted at night. In the morning, all his vitals like BP, pulse rates and other physical parameters are normal.

Doctors said that he has just been given oxygen. Gehlot has been unwell for the last few days. Apart from fever and cold, he had chills and slight difficulty in breathing.

Gehlot had already become Covid positive in the year 2021 and also in 2023. At that time, SMS doctors treated him while isolating him at home. This time, along with being Covid, he has also tested positive for swine flu.

In 2021, Gehlot was also admitted to the cardiology wing of SMS after he complained of chest pain, where his angioplasty was done.

Source: IANS

Gehlot hospitalised after he tests positive for Covid & swine flu

About Gopi

Gopi Adusumilli is a Programmer. He is the editor of SocialNews.XYZ and President of AGK Fire Inc.

He enjoys designing websites, developing mobile applications and publishing news articles on current events from various authenticated news sources.

When it comes to writing he likes to write about current world politics and Indian Movies. His future plans include developing SocialNews.XYZ into a News website that has no bias or judgment towards any.

He can be reached at [email protected]



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Sheena Sharma had just about recovered from the H1N1 flu and the moment her fever broke, she pushed herself to work on Day 4 as she had to meet a deadline for a project she was working on. A few hours into it, she crumbled in a heap, with a sharp headache. A few hours later, she had breathing difficulty again. The next day she had to be hospitalised with pneumonia-like symptoms.

“We are so used to taking drugs that many people do not realise that adequate rest is as much therapy as medication is. If you push yourself too soon after any viral infection, there could be a worsening of symptoms with those with still weakened or compromised lungs lapsing into pneumonia,” says Dr Nikhil Modi, Senior Consultant in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine at Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, New Delhi. He also busts the myth of a relapse. “The body develops immunity against the virus you have suffered from. But due to a lack of rest, the virus leaves a lot of inflammation in the body which may result in a fresh bout of fever, cough and nasal congestion. We call it post-viral inflammation,” Dr Modi adds.

Does H1N1 flu, also called the swine flu, impact the lungs more severely?

Although University of Wisconsin researchers recently showed that the virus was able to penetrate the lungs to a deeper level and caused greater respiratory damage than other forms of flu, and could be more likely to cause pneumonia, they did an animal study with much larger doses of the virus. We need more research on human patients to come to such a drastic conclusion.

What are the chances of a patient developing pneumonia if he or she is not resting properly?

In most cases, symptoms may last for three to five days, with cough lasting for a slightly longer time. There are two possibilities for pneumonia to develop. First, the virus can cause pneumonia on both sides of the lungs, which we call typical viral pneumonia. There is a sudden fall in oxygen saturation and the patient has to be admitted to hospital for stabilisation.

Second, the virus lowers your immunity guard down to such an extent that a secondary bacterial infection can easily superimpose itself on a weakened lung, triggering pneumonia. Relapse of the H1N1 virus is unusual. That’s why rest is needed, to not create conditions for secondary infection to prey on your body.

Festive offer

How much rest and sleep would you recommend to recover from the flu?

Adequate rest, hydration, nutrition and seven to eight hours of sleep are required every day for a recovery. Before resuming your regular hours at the office, make sure that you are up and about in your home environment. If moving around and doing light activities don’t stress you out, you can venture out.

Can there be chances of chronic fatigue syndrome, also known as myalgic encephalopathy (ME)?

Just like Covid, H1N1 influenza, too, has the same side effects. Mental efficacy is also reduced and this may last for a few days to a few weeks as well. Many patients say they are taking longer to recover but we must realise that like Covid, all other flu viruses are mutating and the body is taking time to adapt to them.

For how many days can one be contagious?

Data suggests after five days, you cannot spread the virus but you can take precaution for seven days to be on the safe side.

How risky can it be going to a crowded environment like the office or metro?

I would suggest social distancing and wearing a mask so that you do not pick up other viruses as a concoction of them is floating around in the air.

What is the treatment for H1N1?

Oseltamivir is an antiviral which has been there for quite a long time and taken in early phases, has halted the severity of infection. Along with this, adequate diet and sleep are helpful.

Can I exercise post a H1N1 flu episode?

Once you have recovered fully and your body does not exhaust easily, you can start with lighter exercises.



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Delhi is experiencing both a harsh winter season and high levels of pollution.

Due to this toxic combination, cases of the flu, especially H1N1 infections, are on the rise among the elderly and those with co-morbidities.

Other complications like respiratory and heart-related problems are also seeing a surge in Delhi-NCR.

Doctors attending to the patients explain that common infections in winter can take a long time to heal, especially in children and the elderly, and cause complications.

Here’s all we know about it.

Rising cases of chest infections and flu in Delhi-NCR

The H1N1 flu, sometimes called swine flu, is a type of Influenza A virus.

It is highly contagious and spreads from one person to another through coughs, sneezes, and droplets in the air. Doctors say you can get the infection when you breathe in the virus or touch a contaminated surface, according to Times Now.

Adults recover from severe cases in three to four days, while elderly patients may need a week or longer in the hospital.

Doctors pin the blame for longer hospital stays on the complex interaction between flu and bacterial infections.

The majority of patient reports have included symptoms including runny nose, sneezing, coughing, breathlessness, throat pain, fever with rash, sore throat, and diarrhoea, as per Indian Express.

According to News18, hospitalisation was necessary for some individuals in the National Capital who complained of breathing problems and discomfort.

In most hospitals in Delhi-NCR, COVID-19 tests are also performed for inpatients, even though flu symptoms are similar.

Patients have also reported other complications like influenza, colds, norovirus infections, hypothermia, frostbite, seasonal affective disorder (a form of depression), asthma, respiratory problems, heart-related problems, and joint pains, as per Times Now.

Experts opinion

Dr Manisha Arora, the unit director of internal medicine, at Delhi’s Sri Balaji Action Medical Institute, told News18 that the outpatient department handles 12 to 15 flu cases every day, with one-third of those cases necessitating admission owing to a confirmed H1N1 infection.

“The focus is on treating confirmed positive cases, with seniors — often with comorbidities — experiencing super-added infections requiring oxygen support,” she added.

According to her, while adults heal relatively quickly, underlying medical conditions take longer to heal in the elderly. These conditions are made worse by such infections during the winter, as it increases the risk of chest infections and hypertension.

Similarly, there has been a rebound in H1N1, H3N2, and common influenza among viral diseases, according to Dr Sakshi Singh, consultant in the department of internal medicine at Amrita Hospital Faridabad in Faridabad.

“In cold weather, similar health issues arise. But viral illnesses affecting different health systems have risen in incidences. Along with the rise in pollution and bad air quality, they have been contributing to health risks,” she told the news channel.

Singh from Amrita Hospitals blamed the weather and dipping mercury. “As the weather gets colder and there is an increase in chilly winds, there are certain health issues that have risen.”

She said issues such as colds, coughs, upper respiratory infections, exacerbation in respiratory patients, and new virus illnesses in children, the elderly, and immuno-compromised patients have increased in number.

“Flaring up of joints issues, certain viral disorders, and gastric infections are also on the rise. Also, an increase is noted in hypertensive and cardiac conditions and stroke cases.”

While speaking to Indian Express, Dr Nikhil Modi, Senior Consultant in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine at Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, New Delhi, explained that adequate rest is as important as medication.

He said, “We are so used to taking drugs that many people do not realise that adequate rest is as much therapy as a medication is. If you push yourself too soon after any viral infection, there could be a worsening of symptoms with those with still weakened or compromised lungs lapsing into pneumonia.”

Ways to prevent H1N1

The best defence against H1N1, according to experts, is to receive the annual flu vaccination, which is safe for children older than six months.

Additional measures to stop the swine flu from spreading are as follows:

  • When you cough or sneeze, use a tissue to cover your mouth and nose.
  • Use your elbow to sneeze or cough if you don’t have a tissue.
  • Frequently, wash your hands with soap and water.
  • Avoid touching your lips, nose, or eyes.
  • Don’t approach sick people closely.
  • When you’re sick, stay at home.
  • Don’t exchange personal goods like hairbrushes, shirts, or spoons.

With inputs from agencies

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Amid all the working parts of the human body, the respiratory system administers some of the most important functions that keep us alive. This ensemble of organs, which contains the mouth, nose, throat, and lungs, lets us breathe and talk, manages our body temperature, brings oxygen to other organs, and removes waste carbon dioxide. 

A plethora of diseases can target the respiratory system, disrupting our health in ways that limit those essential functions. 

Be on the watch for these respiratory illnesses that may have a significant impact on your health.

1. Influenza

Known commonly as the “flu”, influenza makes its return each winter as cases spike. Certain flu statistics are difficult to discern because the illness is not always reported, but the World Health Organization estimates 290,000 to 650,000 flu-related deaths around the world annually. 

What Are the Symptoms of Influenza?

The flu has symptomatic similarity to other respiratory infections, causing sore throat, coughing, fever, body aches, tiredness, and headaches. 

How Dangerous Is Influenza?

The combination of different influenza strains has created notable health emergencies throughout the past century. The Spanish flu pandemic from 1918 to 1920 killed around 50 million people globally. The most recent influenza pandemic, the 2009 Swine flu (or H1N1 flu), killed more than 280,000 people globally. 

Another influenza pandemic is possible in the future, but fortunately, we appear to be more prepared than ever to identify potential viral flashpoints and combat respiratory illness.


Read More: What’s the Difference Between Influenza and Stomach Flu?


2. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most widespread respiratory conditions. It impacts 16 million Americans, and millions more are undiagnosed.

What Are the Two Types of COPD?

COPD consists of a group of diseases that block airflow to the lungs and cause other breathing-related problems. There are two main types of COPD: Emphysema — when the air sacs in the lungs (alveoli) are damaged — and chronic bronchitis — when airways are constantly inflamed and become inundated with mucus. Most people with COPD will experience both conditions. 

What Are the Risk Factors for COPD?

Exposure to tobacco smoke and other pollutants increases the risk of getting COPD. Those who have occupations that deal with dust, vapors, and fumes — frequent in mining, construction, and transportation industries — are most likely to suffer from COPD. 

How to Treat COPD

COPD progressively worsens over time, but those who are diagnosed can turn to several treatments that should improve their quality of life. For those with a history of tobacco use, quitting smoking hinders the progression of COPD. Medicines, therapies, and surgeries further alleviate any problems caused by the disease.

What Is the Life Expectency of COPD?

Life expectancy for people with COPD depends on a variety of factors. Mild cases will see people living into their 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s, but additional complications could result in earlier death. The BODE index — measuring body mass index (BMI), airway obstruction, dyspnea (shortness of breath), and exercise tolerance — helps to predict COPD life expectancy.


Read More: Why Are Viruses More Active In The Winter?


3. Asthma 

Like COPD, asthma is a chronic respiratory disease that requires ongoing medical treatment. It results in inflammation and swelling of the airways, making them narrower and limiting the movement of air to the lungs.

How Prevalent Is Asthma?

Asthma affects more than 27 million — or every 1 in 12 — people in the U.S. It is a predominant chronic disease among children, with 4.5 million children under the age of 18 suffering from it. According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, 10 people in the U.S., on average, die from asthma daily.

What Happens During an Asthma Attack?

When an asthma attack occurs, the muscles in the airways tighten in an event known as a bronchospasm. Asthma attacks, which can be caused by exposure to allergens or a pre-existing illness, may last for only a few minutes, or for a longer period. Mild cases can be resolved with a fast-acting inhaler, which instantly delivers medication that relaxes airway muscles and reduces inflammation. If coughing or shortness of breath continues for days, however, medical treatment should be sought. 


Read More: Coughs of Many Colors: How to Get Rid of Phlegm


4. Pneumonia 

Pneumonia hits one or both lungs with an infection that can be deadly for people in high-risk groups. When someone contracts pneumonia, the alveoli of their lungs fill up with fluid, pus or blood. There are more than 30 causes of pneumonia that stem from bacteria, viruses, and fungi. 

A common bacterial version of the infection is pneumococcal pneumonia, caused by bacteria called Streptococcus pneumoniae. It is particularly dangerous for adults with chronic health conditions such as COPD, asthma, diabetes, and heart disease. 

What Are the Symptoms of Bacterial Pneumonia?

Symptoms of bacterial pneumonia include coughing that produces mucus, fever, heavy sweating, chills, and breathing difficulties. Antibiotics are used to facilitate recovery, and other simple treatments such as resting and increasing fluid intake help speed up the healing process.

What Are the Symptoms of Viral Pneumonia?

Pneumonia caused by viruses make up one-third of all pneumonia cases. Viral pneumonia shares many of the same early-stage symptoms as the bacterial infection, but it may eventually cause headaches, muscle pain, and weakness. This type of pneumonia is often mild and gets better within 1 to 2 weeks with symptomatic management, without the need for antibiotics.

Comparing Bacterial Pneumonia vs. Viral Pneumonia

Viral pneumonia is more likely if someone exhibits lower temperature, problems in both lungs, and a lack of obvious symptoms at first. Bacterial pneumonia, deadlier than its viral counterpart, is usually associated with higher temperature, and problems with only one lung, and acute onset.

Every year, about 1 million adults in the U.S. are admitted to hospitals with pneumonia, and about 50,000 of them die from the disease.


Read More: Chicken Noodle Soup Really Can Help When You’re Sick


5. Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis — a persistent respiratory menace throughout the ages — has gone by numerous recognizable names: TB, consumption, or ‘the white death.’ From the 18th to the early 20th centuries, it flourished among populations and generated widespread concern. Mortality rates from the disease have since fallen with the inception of a vaccination and improved public health measures, but it remains an eminent danger in Southeast Asia, Africa, and the Western Pacific

What Causes Tuberculosis?

Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria, is spread through the air. Many people who are infected, however, do not show symptoms and cannot spread the disease: this is considered latent tuberculosis

What Are the Symptoms of Tuberculosis?

About 5 to 10 percent of infected people will start to show symptoms and develop TB disease. Once it advances to this point, symptoms include prolonged cough with blood-tinged sputum, chest pain, weakness, fatigue, night sweats, and fever. The main treatment for TB is antibiotics; The treatment period can take anywhere from 4 to 9 months

How Prevalent Is Tuberculosis?

An estimated 10.6 million people contracted the disease worldwide, and 1.3 million people died as a result, making TB the second leading infectious killer after COVID-19. In contrast to these staggering numbers, there have been only a few hundred TB deaths in the U.S. every year since the early 2000s.


Read More: What Is the Drug Bedaquiline and Why Is It Important for Those With Tuberculosis?


6. COVID-19

Although the havoc that ensued from the COVID-19 pandemic has simmered down, thousands of people continue to die from this respiratory illness. 

What Causes COVID?

Caused by a virus called severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), this well-known disease imposes a wide array of symptoms that range from mild to severe.

What Are the Symptoms of COVID?

People with COVID experience a typical fever, cough, and fatigue, but other effects can arise from more severe cases. COVID-19 is set apart from other respiratory illnesses by a few unusual symptoms that impact bodily functions and persist for months, also known as Long COVID. These include digestive problems, loss of taste/smell, and skin changes. Some people with COVID experience sudden loss of memory and general confusion; It turns out that COVID doesn’t just attack the lungs, but also has a chance to develop inflammation of the brain, or encephalitis

How Dangerous Is COVID?

Nearly 7 million deaths have been attributed to COVID-19, with about 1 million of them in the U.S. Although 71 percent of the global population has been vaccinated, the arrival of new strains keeps COVID a real concern.


Read More: Does a Runny Nose Mean You Have COVID-19, the Flu, or a Common Cold?

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NEW DELHI: A surge in influenza cases compounded by H1N1, or influenza A, and other respiratory illnesses have been reported across hospitals in the city. Though most of the cases are mild, many patients have been admitted in hospitals, according to doctors.

flu symptoms

According to doctors, H1N1, also called swine flu, has symptoms similar to seasonal flu, such as fever, cough, sore throat, bodyache, fatigue and headache. Like Covid-19, severe instances of H1N1 may result in complications such as pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome.
“Six patients are currently undergoing treatment for H1N1,” said Dr Akshay Budhraja, senior consultant & head of sleep and respiratory medicine, Aakash Healthcare Super Specialty Hospital, Dwarka. He added that to contain the spread of H1N1, hospital authorities had established dedicated flu corners within the medical facility to provide specialised care for individuals affected by swine flu.
Though no H1N1 case was reported at Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital, three patients were admitted with Covid. “Of them, two are on oxygen support and one is in the ICU. Besides, three patients with severe acute respiratory infection have also been admitted,” said Dr Ajay Shukla, director and medical superintendent of the hospital.
In clinical terms, there isn’t much to differentiate between these illnesses as all are a result of respiratory viruses and they present as cough, cold and, in some cases, shortness of breath, according to Dr Sandeep Budhiraja, group medical director, Max Healthcare. He added that in most of these cases, patients had a mild ailment limited to the upper respiratory tract and were managed in the outpatient department.
The main concern is about patients with comorbidities who may need admission for severe infection. Dr Manjeeta Nath Das, senior consultant, internal medicine, Narayana Hospital, Gurgaon, said, “While young patients recover within a week, the elderly with severe inflection spiked by comorbidities take more time. Their recovery depends on symptomatic treatment.” In the past three days, of the 15 patients presenting with flu-like symptoms, four tested positive for H1N1 and one for Covid, Das added.
According to doctors at Kalawati Saran Children’s Hospital, around five youngsters have been diagnosed with H1N1 this month. The hospital administration has created an eight-bedded isolation ward to deal with such cases.
“Since we are not testing everyone, there is no individual data but most of the cases are mild and they recover in 3-5 days,” assured Dr Rommel Tickoo, director, internal medicine, Max Superspecialty Hospital, Saket. “It’s a mix of H1N1, Covid and other viruses. Some create complications like pneumonia, for which they need admission for monitoring and for intravenous medication.”
To curb the spread of H1N1, early detection, swift diagnosis and appropriate management are important, says Dr Avi Kumar, senior consultant, pulmonology, Fortis Escorts. “It is imperative for individuals to be attuned to flu-like symptoms, seek prompt medical attention and adhere to preventive guidelines,” Kumar advised, adding that his hospital had admitted six patients, four of them cases attributed to H1N1 and two to Covid.
Dr Manisha Arora admitted these were challenging times, with the escalating influx of flu cases, mainly H1N1, coupled with super-added bacterial infections, especially among the elderly. The senior consultant and head of internal medicine at Sri Balaji Action Medical Institute said, “In recent days, our OPD has been managing nearly 12-15 flu cases daily, with one-third requiring admission with confirmed H1NI infection.”
To accurately diagnose H1N1, managing director of Aakash Healthcare Dr Aashish Chaudhry emphasised the necessity of RT-PCR testing. As a preventive measure, he also recommended prophylactic antiviral treatment for at-risk individuals, such as family members of patients. Such an approach aims to curb the spread of the virus and protect vulnerable individuals from severe outcomes.



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Dr Rajesh Bendre, National Technical Head & Chief Pathologist, Apollo Diagnostic

Influenza, commonly known as the flu, is a respiratory illness caused by Influenza RNA viruses. There are 2 main types of Influenza virus, namely Types A and B which cause most human illness and that are responsible for flu seasons each year. Type A viruses cause the greatest morbidity and mortality. Seasonal Influenza is caused by several circulating Influenza viruses such as Influenza A Subtypes – HI N l (Swine flu), H3N2, H2N2, Influenza B, etc. The Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1 or Swine Flu) 2009 virus that caused the Pandemic [2009-2010] continues to circulate causing outbreaks of Seasonal Influenza in various parts of the country.

Everything about Influenza: It tends to occur more frequently after the monsoon season and can impact people of all ages. Young children and individuals over 65 years old have a higher likelihood of being affected worldwide. Those working in healthcare, as well as individuals with underlying health conditions like lung disease, heart disease, liver disease, kidney disease, blood disorders, or diabetes, and those with compromised immune systems are at increased risk.

Transmission: Flu is airborne which means it can spread from person-to-person, through large droplets generated by the act of coughing and sneezing. These infectious droplets are highly contagious and when inhaled by an otherwise healthy person can affect them. There are other modes of transmission, including indirect contact by touching a contaminated object or surface (fomite transmission) or close contact (including shaking hands).

Signs and Symptoms

  • Fever: 100.4F/higher temperature or feeling feverish/chills
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  •  Headaches and body aches
  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Fatigue
  • Runny or stuffy nose

Primary prevention of flu: – Preventing transmission of the influenza virus is a multi-faceted approach including covering the nose and mouth with a tissue when coughing or sneezing and washing your hands. Wearing a mask helps protect you and others from the flu and all other respiratory illnesses including COVID-19. Washing your hands regularly and using alcohol-based sanitizer is recommended. Avoid touching your face, periodically clean and disinfect the surfaces, getting yourself vaccinated with a seasonal flu shot, and staying indoors while you are sick to prevent the spreading of infection to others are also some vital tips that one should follow without fail.

 The diagnostic tests for flu: The treating doctor will advise the following tests and decide the treatment plan accordingly. These Tests aid the clinician in distinguishing influenza from other respiratory viral and/or bacterial infections.

  • Rapid flu tests: Can identify the influenza virus in a throat swab and deliver results in just minutes. Rapid antigen tests for influenza aid in spotting viral antigens in nasal secretions. Nevertheless, the accuracy of the test results is limited, as they can only detect 50-70% of flu cases. In case of a negative result from a rapid antigen test, a molecular test can be conducted as a follow-up.
  • Typically, molecular tests use the methodology of multiplex RT-PCR for targeting influenza A, H1N1, H3N2, and B. There are also other panels which would include Parainfluenza A, B, RSV, adenoviruses & Sars-Cov2.



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A woman who says she suffered chronic health complications after taking the AstraZeneca vaccine claims to have been censored from sharing her story on Facebook.

Caroline Pover, 52, received the jab in March 2021 and within nine hours, experienced convulsions, shivering, breathing difficulties and low blood pressure.

Ms Pover, of Cirencester, Gloucestershire, says she was hospitalised when her condition escalated to ‘stroke-like’ symptoms, in addition to exhaustion, breathing difficulties, a racing heart and migraines.

Her story was shared in a national newspaper in March last year as she and 800 other victims struggled to claim the Government’s Vaccine Damage Payment Scheme (VDPS).

But after sharing the link on her Facebook feed at the start of this year, Ms Pover says the website put a warning notice on her account.

Caroline Pover, 52, received the jab in March 2021 and says that within nine hours, she experienced convulsions, shivering, breathing difficulties and low blood pressure

Caroline Pover, 52, received the jab in March 2021 and says that within nine hours, she experienced convulsions, shivering, breathing difficulties and low blood pressure

Ms Pover says that over time the censorship led her to develop a specific writing style that would help prevent posts from being flagged up

Ms Pover says that over time the censorship led her to develop a specific writing style that would help prevent posts from being flagged up

Ms Pover's Facebook account was given a warning, allegedly after she posted a newspaper article detailing her difficult experiences with the AstraZeneca vaccine

Ms Pover’s Facebook account was given a warning, allegedly after she posted a newspaper article detailing her difficult experiences with the AstraZeneca vaccine

'It's a ridiculous situation for vaccine injured people, who have a right to information,' said Ms Pover

‘It’s a ridiculous situation for vaccine injured people, who have a right to information,’ said Ms Pover

Ms Pover, herself a freelance journalist and entrepreneur, said: ‘My posts about what was happening to me started having FB “notes” appearing underneath them about vaccination.

‘A group page I was an admin on was shut down completely by Facebook in the summer of 2021.

‘When I posted the Daily Express article, which did an excellent job of not discussing anything pro or anti… I received a warning and the post was hidden.

‘It’s a ridiculous situation for vaccine-injured people, who have a right to information.

‘If this was an online support group relating to cancer or another type of serious condition, we’d be outraged at the thought of it being censored and we’d be very sensitive to people having to navigate a very complicated health situation.’

Ms Pover said she made her first post about vaccine side effects on March 3, 2021, shortly after receiving a Covid jab.

She said: ‘In the week that followed I was posting about my health and I always thought I’d be fine the next day.

‘After a few weeks, I noticed that little notes from Facebook were appearing whenever I posted anything relating to the vaccine.’

Ms Pover claims she was subsequently ‘shadow banned’ on Facebook and that often, her posts failed to appear in the timelines of her friends and family.

She said: ‘People would tag me in posts and complain that they weren’t getting any traction. I’d say to them, “don’t tag me, it will just disappear if you do.”‘

Ms Pover says that over time, the censorship led her to develop a specific writing style that would help prevent posts from being flagged up.

She has now decided to write a book about people receiving adverse reactions from Covid jabs.

And she says her experiences with censorship have only made her even more determined to share her message.

Ms Pover said: ‘The physical health struggles we face aren’t just what happens in the minutes, hours or days immediately after injection; it’s what we are still dealing with years later, as well as the impact of being censored.’

Facebook has been approached for comment. 

Elsewhere on the platform, UK CV Family – a private Facebook group with over 1,000 members for those who claim they were left injured or bereaved by the Covid vaccines – has had to take steps to avoid being shut down.

The group began in November 2021 Charlet Crichton, 42, after she suffered an adverse reaction from the AstraZeneca jab after it was given to her while she was volunteering at a vaccination centre in Folkestone, Kent.

The bad reaction led Ms Crichton to become bed bound for weeks and has since been forced to give up her sports therapy business which she ran for 13 years.

She told the paper: ‘I set up the group because I was finding people online in the UK like me. And we felt we didn’t have anyone to talk to about it apart from each other.’

The Facebook group is now one of three online groups for those bereaved by the vaccine to have been granted core-participant status in the Covid Inquiry.

Lawyers representing those injured or bereaved by the jabs said the compensation scheme was 'no longer fit for purpose'

Lawyers representing those injured or bereaved by the jabs said the compensation scheme was ‘no longer fit for purpose’

Researchers tasked with investigating the adverse reaction believe it occurs due to the modified cold virus lurking in the jab acting like a magnet to a type of protein in the blood called platelet factor 4

Researchers tasked with investigating the adverse reaction believe it occurs due to the modified cold virus lurking in the jab acting like a magnet to a type of protein in the blood called platelet factor 4

Rare (approximately one in 1,000) issues include facial drooping on one side. Very rare (one in 10,000) side effects can see people paralysed

Rare (approximately one in 1,000) issues include facial drooping on one side. Very rare (one in 10,000) side effects can see people paralysed

Common side effects, which health bosses say can affect more than 10 per cent of recipients, include fatigue, 'flu-like' symptoms, and pain in the arms or legs. Stomach pain, a rash and excessive sweating were uncommon, strikes roughly one in 100 people who get vaccinated

Common side effects, which health bosses say can affect more than 10 per cent of recipients, include fatigue, ‘flu-like’ symptoms, and pain in the arms or legs. Stomach pain, a rash and excessive sweating were uncommon, strikes roughly one in 100 people who get vaccinated

A father of two is in the process of suing the pharmaceutical giant at the High Court in London over the injury, while the widower of a woman who died from the jab has also brought a claim to the court. Pictured: Doses of the AstraZeneca Covid vaccine

A father of two is in the process of suing the pharmaceutical giant at the High Court in London over the injury, while the widower of a woman who died from the jab has also brought a claim to the court. Pictured: Doses of the AstraZeneca Covid vaccine 

This means Ms Crichton, who claims she suffered from myocarditis following the jab, and other members of the group will be able to give evidence throughout the statutory process.  

In the page’s description it stresses that it is ‘not anti-vax’ and asks participants to ‘refrain from posting anything that suggests otherwise’.

‘We very quickly learned that we had to self censor, otherwise we’d be shut down,’ she added, explaining that her own comments had previously be blocked ‘to prevent misuse’. 

On one occasion Ms Critchon said her account was even banned after Meta claimed it did not meet its standards, while she claims others have been shadow banned – meaning individuals posts are hidden – over their comments.

‘It’s very, very difficult because we want to talk about what we’re going through,’ she added.

On a separate occasion, YouTube tried to censor a video of lawyers giving evidence at the Covid Inquiry about the vaccines. The streaming giant said the clip was a violation of ‘medical misinformation policy’. 

The paper also said that footage of Stephen Bowie, a member of the Scottish Vaccine Injury Group who suffered a spinal stroke and blood clots following the jab, was also flagged with a similar warning. 

Molly Kingsley, the co-founder of Us4Them, said the restrictions put in place by social media platforms were ‘Orwellian’ after her views by the Government’s Counter Disinformation Unit were allegedly criticsed by YouTube.

AstraZeneca said in a statement: ‘Patient safety is our highest priority and regulatory authorities have clear and stringent standards to ensure the safe use of all medicines, including vaccines. 

‘Our sympathy goes out to anyone who has lost loved ones or reported health problems.

‘From the body of evidence in clinical trials and real-world data, Vaxzevria has continuously been shown to have an acceptable safety profile and regulators around the world consistently state that the benefits of vaccination outweigh the risks of extremely rare potential side effects.

‘The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Authority (MHRA) has granted full marketing approval for Vaxzevria for the UK based on the safety profile and efficacy of the vaccine.’

MailOnline has contacted Meta and YouTube for comment.

  • Have YOU been censored on social media from talking about your Covid experiences? Email [email protected].

The full list of vaccines that Government will pay financial support for, if you’re left 60 per cent disabled 

  • COVID-19
  • diphtheria
  • haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)
  • human papillomavirus
  • influenza, except for influenza caused by a pandemic influenza virus
  • measles
  • meningitis B
  • meningitis C
  • meningitis W
  • mumps
  • pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 (swine flu) – up to 31 August 2010
  • pertussis (whooping cough)
  • pneumococcal infection
  • poliomyelitis
  • rotavirus
  • rubella
  • smallpox – up to 1 August 1971
  • tetanus
  • tuberculosis

You may have had a combined vaccination against a number of the diseases listed. For example, you might have been vaccinated against DTP (diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis) or MMR (measles, mumps and rubella).

You may also be able to get a payment if you’re severely disabled because either:

  • your mother was vaccinated against one of the diseases in the list while she was pregnant
  • you’ve been in close physical contact with someone who’s had an oral vaccine against poliomyelitis

Source: Gov.uk

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Cold wave in India: Severe cold weather continues to grip many parts of India, with maximum temperatures in Punjab, Chandigarh, Haryana and other parts of North India falling below normal.

As winter arrives and the cold wave intensifies, health officials are highlighting a sudden increase in viral infections, influenza, and COVID-19 cases.

Health risks amid cold weather

According to experts, declining temperatures cause increased moisture in the air, low wind speed, and an increase in pollution, all of which contribute to various infections.

Because of the falling temperature, there is fog, which, when combined with pollution, creates smog. This atmospheric condition can cause various types of infections, and many people are having difficulty breathing.

The rise in cases is not limited to COVID-19; other infections, such as swine flu, influenza, and H1N1, have also increased. Hospitals are seeing an increase in patients with symptoms such as cough, cold, fever, breathing issues, low oxygen levels, and pneumonia complaints.

Preventive measures to avoid infections this winter

Staying inside whenever possible and covering the body adequately in cold weather, particularly the head and legs. Consuming nutritious, hot food, staying clean, and wearing masks when going outside are all important precautions.

Wearing a mask whenever you leave the house is crucial as it will protect you from many viral infections as well as pollution.

Also Read | Weather update: Orange alert issued in these districts of Punjab, check details

Many people use room heaters to cope with low temperatures. To be honest, while room heaters can make everything more comfortable and warm, they are also hazardous to your health.

Room heaters can cause dry skin and amplify allergy symptoms. Furthermore, sleeping with the room heater on can result in elevated carbon monoxide levels, which can be fatal. 

If you use a room heater on a regular basis, you should be aware of the following health risks:

Also Read | Fog fallout : Delhi cops killed in horrific road accident in Sonipat

Fire Hazard

Many of us use portable heaters as an alternative to central heating technology, but they can cause serious fires if not used safely.

Firefighters and safety managers from Electrical Safety First, the UK’s electrical safety experts, recommend placing your heater on a flat surface to prevent it from falling over.

The heater should be at least 3 feet (1 metre) away from anything. You should not let it lean against curtains, clothes, blankets, or chairs.

Dryness and respiratory concerns

The heat from room heaters can dry out the air, resulting in dry skin, eyes, and throat. This dryness can exacerbate respiratory problems, causing nasal congestion and making people more vulnerable to infections. It is critical to keep the humidity levels in the room and hydrate properly. 

Also Read | Himachal Pradesh freezes: Sissu Lake transforms into frozen wonderland, watch visuals

Carbon monoxide poisoning

Faulty or improperly maintained room heaters, particularly those that use fuel, can emit carbon monoxide, a silent killer. Inhaling this odourless and colourless gas can cause headaches, dizziness, and nausea, and in extreme cases, it can be fatal. When using fuel-powered heaters, always make sure to provide adequate ventilation.

Allergies and asthma triggers

Room heaters can spread dust and other allergens, exacerbating allergies and causing asthma attacks. Regular cleaning and maintenance of the heater can reduce allergen circulation, resulting in a healthier environment.

Also Read | 10 Risks of Excessive Room Heater Use

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Currently, the cases of influenza (flu) are rising in people of all age groups. Here, we explain to you the types, transmission, signs and symptoms, prevention, and flu tests.

Influenza, commonly known as the flu, is a respiratory illness caused by Influenza RNA viruses. There are 2 main types of Influenza virus, namely Types A and B which cause most human illness and that are responsible for flu seasons each year. Type A viruses cause the greatest morbidity and mortality. Seasonal Influenza is caused by several circulating Influenza viruses such as Influenza A Subtypes – HI N l (Swine flu), H3N2, H2N2, Influenza B, etc. The Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1 or Swine Flu) 2009 virus that caused the Pandemic [2009-2010] continues to circulate causing outbreaks of Seasonal Influenza in various parts of the country.

Everything about Influenza: It tends to occur more frequently after the monsoon season and can impact people of all ages. Young children and individuals over 65 years old have a higher likelihood of being affected worldwide. Those working in healthcare, as well as individuals with underlying health conditions like lung disease, heart disease, liver disease, kidney disease, blood disorders, or diabetes, and those with compromised immune systems are at increased risk.

Transmission: Flu is airborne which means it can spread from person-to-person, through large droplets generated by the act of coughing and sneezing. These infectious droplets are highly contagious and when inhaled by an otherwise healthy person can affect them. There are other modes of transmission, including indirect contact by touching a contaminated object or surface (fomite transmission) or close contact (including shaking hands).

Signs and Symptoms

· Fever: 100.4◦F/higher temperature or feeling feverish/chills

· Cough

· Sore throat

· Headaches and body aches

· Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath

· Fatigue

· Runny or stuffy nose

Primary prevention of flu: – Preventing transmission of the influenza virus is a multi-faceted approach including covering the nose and mouth with a tissue when coughing or sneezing and washing your hands. Wearing a mask helps protect you and others from the flu and all other respiratory illnesses including COVID-19. Washing your hands regularly and using alcohol-based sanitizer is recommended. Avoid touching your face, periodically clean and disinfect the surfaces, getting yourself vaccinated with a seasonal flu shot, and staying indoors while you are sick to prevent the spreading of infection to others are also some vital tips that one should follow without fail.

The diagnostic tests for flu: The treating doctor will advise the following tests and decide the treatment plan accordingly. These Tests aid the clinician in distinguishing influenza from other respiratory viral and/or bacterial infections.

· Rapid flu tests: Can identify the influenza virus in a throat swab and deliver results in just minutes. Rapid antigen tests for influenza aid in spotting viral antigens in nasal secretions. Nevertheless, the accuracy of the test results is limited, as they can only detect 50-70% of flu cases. In case of a negative result from a rapid antigen test, a molecular test can be conducted as a follow-up.

· Typically, molecular tests use the methodology of multiplex RT-PCR for targeting influenza A, H1N1, H3N2, and B. There are also other panels which would include Parainfluenza A, B, RSV, adenoviruses & Sars-Cov2.

Dr Rajesh Bendre, National Technical Head & Chief Pathologist, Apollo Diagnostic



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Ahmedabad: Seven out of every 10 patients seen by the city’s general practitioners are complaining of symptoms such as cough, cold, fever, runny nose, body ache and sore throat. With temperatures dipping for the past few days, the citizens are battling with the long-term impact of flu infections.
Dr Pravin Garg, a city-based general practitioner, said that the onset often starts with fever and chills.“In the first phase, the citizens often try to treat themselves with over-the-counter medicines or home remedies. In case of flu, swine flu and Covid, it may not work. Not many go for the H1N1 (swine flu) test as it is expensive, but it is often cured by the antivirals by experts,” he said. “The bottom line is, do not wait beyond two days to consult a doctor.”
Government-run hospitals, including Civil Hospital and Sola Civil Hospital, have also recorded a spike in OPD patients with symptoms like flu. “Winter is often the time when there are multiple viral infections — fever and cold are often treated at home, and tests are seldom carried out to understand the type of flu, except the cases where the patients show extreme symptoms,” said a senior official with Civil Hospital.
Dr Manoj Vithlani, an internal medicine specialist, said that timely treatment with antiviral — especially in cases of swine flu — can reduce severity drastically. “The patients should take antiviral within 72 hours for it to work. We, however, recommend it for those with co-morbidities and old age. Flu vaccines, not very popular here, can surely reduce the chances of infection and severity,” he said. “Symptoms-based treatment, hydration and rest are recommended for the patients.”
We also published the following articles recently

Cold severe, cases of seasonal flu on the rise
Ludhiana is experiencing a cold wave, leading to a surge in flu cases. Health professionals report an increase in patients with symptoms such as fever, cough, sore throat, and cold. The active strain of flu is contagious, with entire families being infected. While symptoms in adults usually subside in a few days, cough may persist. Specialist consultations are advised for patients with prolonged fever, difficulty breathing, and chest pain. Differentiating between flu and Covid-19, flu cases have fewer hospital admissions and fatalities. Cold weather and high pollution levels worsen flu symptoms, especially among children aged 1-2. Parents are advised to avoid crowded places. Those with chronic illnesses should also take precautions.
For health dept, year-end comes with swine flu scare
An increase in swine flu cases has left the health department in Ludhiana on high alert. Over 15 cases have been reported in December, the second highest in recent years. Health officials advise wearing masks, avoiding crowded places, and caution for vulnerable individuals. Contacts of swine flu patients are given prophylactic treatment. The health team conducts surveys to identify flu-like symptoms. Experts recommend the Influenza vaccine to prevent swine flu, especially during the change of season.



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Islamabad : Viral pneumonia may prove to be more deadly and may kill more patients than dengue fever in the winter season if the concerned government authorities and individuals do not give due attention to its prevention and control.

It is important to make the public aware of the fact that influenza virus has peak activity in the months of January and February and the most virulent strains of flu including subtypes of influenza A, H1N1 and H3N2 along with influenza B have already been detected in a number of patients. Many patients with complications of flu have been undergoing treatment in intensive care units of various hospitals both in the public and private sectors in this region of the country.

The image shows a patient coughing. — Pixabay

The image shows a patient coughing. — Pixabay

Influenza A and B viruses are circulating in the environment though influenza A cases are on the rise and influenza A H1N1, seasonal flu is more prevalent. The National Institute of Health, Islamabad has already reported that influenza A H3N2 is causing serious respiratory illness among people across Pakistan. This year, the influenza outbreak seems to be hitting the population more severely.

Data collected by ‘The News’ has revealed that the number of cases with health threats caused by flu particularly influenza A virus in this region of the country is registering a sharp increase and the viral pneumonia, the flu strains cause, have emerged as a serious health threat.

Studies reveal that viral pneumonia is an infection of lungs caused by a virus and the most common cause is the flu, though one may get viral pneumonia from the common cold and other viruses. These nasty germs usually stick to the upper part of the respiratory system but the trouble starts when they get down into lungs and then the air sacs in lungs get infected and inflamed, and they fill up with fluid.

The ICUs of almost all public sector hospitals in the twin cities of Islamabad and Rawalpindi are overburdened and majority of the cases are with pneumonia requiring ventilator supported beds. Almost none of the public sector hospitals in the twin cities has vacant ventilator supported beds at the moment mainly because of the huge number of patients.

Health experts believe that the further spread of flu leading to pneumonia may make the situation worse in the days to come. Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs that can be bacterial, fungal or viral but some features are specific to viral pneumonia that need urgent interventions.

It is worth mentioning that influenza A H1N1 or swine flu, now known as seasonal flu outbreak of 2017-2018 killed more people in the year than any other disease. Equally virulent strains of viruses are prevalent in our population. The syndrome starts with fever, cough, throat rash, sinusitis and flu symptoms. Nothing happens in majority of the cases as viral influenza is self-limiting and only paracetamol is enough for relieving symptoms. However, one to five per cent of flu and respiratory tract infections lead to viral pneumonia, respiratory failure, Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), Sepsis and multi-organ dysfunction and death.

The warning signs of viral pneumonia include breathlessness that rapidly develops to respiratory distress. Other warning signs are increase in breathing rate, cough with blood, drowsiness, irritability, extreme fatigue and intractable chest pain. Chest radiographs show fluffy shadows and infiltrates in both lungs. Once this develops, the majority of patients need hospital admission and in many cases, ICU is required.

Experts say that it is time to follow preventive measures including administration of vaccine against flu and vaccine against pneumonia in those with pre-existing lung diseases like asthma, COPD and those with past history of pneumonia. Avoid cold and try to remain inside homes during the night and early in the morning. One should cover oneself and nose properly if staying outside in the extreme cold and must report to the nearest healthcare facility immediately in case of any warning signs of pneumonia.

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As winter sets in and cold wave intensifies, health experts are highlighting a sudden surge in viral infections, influenza, and COVID-19 cases.
Dr Nikhil Modi, a senior pulmonologist at Indraprastha Apollo Hospital, pointed out that the declining temperature leads to increased moisture in the air, low wind speed, and a rise in pollution, contributing to various infections.
“Due to the falling temperature, there is fog, which, along with pollution, forms smog. This atmospheric condition can result in different types of infections, and many people are experiencing difficulty in breathing,” Dr Modi said.
“The rise in cases is not limited to COVID-19, other infections, including swine flu, influenza, and H1N1, have also seen an increase. Hospitals are witnessing a surge in patients with symptoms such as cough, cold, fever, breathing problems, decreased oxygen levels, and pneumonia complaints,” he added.
Dr Nikhil Modi emphasized preventive measures to avoid infections in winter.
He recommended staying indoors whenever possible, covering the body adequately in cold weather, especially the head and legs. Consuming nutritious, hot food, maintaining cleanliness, and wearing masks when going outside are crucial precautions.
“Stay indoors in such weather and not go out of the house unless it is necessary. The best way to avoid diseases in winter is to keep your body properly covered in the cold. Especially cover your head and legs,” he said.
“Eat nutritious food, eat hot food, take care of cleanliness and wear a mask whenever you go out of the house. Because the mask will not only protect you from many viral infections but will also protect you from pollution,” Dr Modi added.
Amid the surge in COVID-19 cases, the doctor urged people not to ignore symptoms such as cough, cold, fever, body ache, loose motion, throat mucus, and headaches.
He emphasized the importance of testing for other viral infections, not just COVID.
“If a patient is continuously experiencing problems like cough, cold, fever, body ache, loose motion, mucus in the throat, headache, then do not ignore it and do not just get the corona test done. But also get tested for other viral infections. Because many times people get tested for COVID-19 only when they have a cough, cold, fever etc. and do not get tested for other diseases and later their problems increase,” the doctor said.
“Many times people ignore fever for several days, which is not right. If a fever above 100 persists for two or three days continuously, consult a doctor immediately and get it checked. It is not right to take only paracetamol,” he added.
India recorded 774 fresh cases of COVID-19 in the last 24 hours according to the Union Health Ministry.
As per official data, two deaths have been reported in the country in the last 24 hours – one each in Gujarat and Tamil Nadu.
With this, the total count of coronavirus cases in India since its outbreak in January 2020 has reached 4,50,17,431 with an increase of 774 cases in the last 24 hours. The death toll due to COVID-19 cases in India has risen to, 5,33,387 reflecting an increase of two deaths in the last 24 hours.
The total number of COVID-19 cases that have recovered in India is 4,44,79,804, an increase of 919 since yesterday morning



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NEW DELHI: As winter sets in and cold wave intensifies, health experts are highlighting a sudden surge in viral infections, influenza, and Covid-19 cases.
Dr Nikhil Modi, a senior pulmonologist at Indraprastha Apollo Hospital, pointed out that the declining temperature leads to increased moisture in the air, low wind speed, and a rise in pollution, contributing to various infections.
“Due to the falling temperature, there is fog, which, along with pollution, forms smog. This atmospheric condition can result in different types of infections, and many people are experiencing difficulty in breathing,” Dr Modi said.
“The rise in cases is not limited to Covid-19, other infections, including swine flu, influenza, and H1N1, have also seen an increase. Hospitals are witnessing a surge in patients with symptoms such as cough, cold, fever, breathing problems, decreased oxygen levels, and pneumonia complaints,” he added.
Dr Nikhil Modi emphasized preventive measures to avoid infections in winter.
He recommended staying indoors whenever possible, covering the body adequately in cold weather, especially the head and legs. Consuming nutritious, hot food, maintaining cleanliness, and wearing masks when going outside are crucial precautions.
“Stay indoors in such weather and not go out of the house unless it is necessary. The best way to avoid diseases in winter is to keep your body properly covered in the cold. Especially cover your head and legs,” he said.
“Eat nutritious food, eat hot food, take care of cleanliness and wear a mask whenever you go out of the house. Because the mask will not only protect you from many viral infections but will also protect you from pollution,” Dr Modi added.
Amid the surge in Covid-19 cases, the doctor urged people not to ignore symptoms such as cough, cold, fever, body ache, loose motion, throat mucus, and headaches.
He emphasized the importance of testing for other viral infections, not just Covid.
“If a patient is continuously experiencing problems like cough, cold, fever, body ache, loose motion, mucus in the throat, headache, then do not ignore it and do not just get the corona test done. But also get tested for other viral infections. Because many times people get tested for Covid-19 only when they have a cough, cold, fever etc. and do not get tested for other diseases and later their problems increase,” the doctor said.
“Many times people ignore fever for several days, which is not right. If a fever above 100 persists for two or three days continuously, consult a doctor immediately and get it checked. It is not right to take only paracetamol,” he added.
India recorded 774 fresh cases of Covid-19 in the last 24 hours according to the Union Health Ministry.
As per official data, two deaths have been reported in the country in the last 24 hours – one each in Gujarat and Tamil Nadu.
With this, the total count of coronavirus cases in India since its outbreak in January 2020 has reached 4,50,17,431 with an increase of 774 cases in the last 24 hours. The death toll due to Covid-19 cases in India has risen to, 5,33,387 reflecting an increase of two deaths in the last 24 hours.
The total number of Covid-19 cases that have recovered in India is 4,44,79,804, an increase of 919 since yesterday morning.



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Speaking about the seasonal illnesses brought on by cold waves, Apollo Hospital Senior Pulmonologist Dr. Nikhil Modi stated that lowering temperatures cause lower-level pollution to rise, which in turn slows down wind movement and creates smog, which causes allergy symptoms including coughing and breathing problems.
Dr. Nikhil Modi, a pulmonologist at Apollo Hospital, stated to the media that as the temperature drops, pollution at lower levels rises, the wind picks up, and haze forms. This leads to allergic reactions, including coughing and breathing difficulties. Numerous virus types can become active and cause viral diseases including coronavirus and influenza. People with asthma have trouble breathing, and COVID-19 cases are increasing. There are also reports of swine flu cases.

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