CHANDIGARH: Half of the total 22 districts in Haryana on Sunday reported problematic air quality levels, with Faridabad faring the worst in the Air Quality Index.
The NCR district recorded an Air Quality Index of 322, which is described as very poor on the AQI by the Central Pollution Control Board. Seven districts recorded poor air quality and three recorded moderate air quality.
According to CPCB, very poor air quality could cause respiratory illness on prolonged exposure, while poor air quality could lead to breathing discomfort to most people on prolonged exposure. If air quality is moderate, it could cause breathing discomfort in people with lungs, asthma and heart diseases.
The Commission for Air Quality Management (CAQM) has already put in place a complete ban on diesel gensets in industries of NCR. Special directions have also been issued by the commission to NCR districts to use sprinkler system on roads and close down stone crushers.
The air quality is bad in spite of a decline in stubble burning in the state. With Kaithal topping the table with 12 active fire locations, a total of 25 stubble burning incidents were detected in the state during the day.
So far this month, the state has recorded only 714 cases.
Unclean air is also attributed to poorly maintained roads and excessive traffic. Cities which recorded poor air quality include Gurugram, Bahadrugarh, Ballabhgarh and Manesar, all cities which fall in Haryana’s NCR.
“Our teams are continuously monitoring industrial and other activities. As far as sprinkling of water is concerned, civic bodies have to carry it out,” said a senior officer of Haryana State Pollution Control Board (HSPCB) in Panchkula.
When contacted, the officials in agriculture department claimed that stubble burning was under control. “Haryana will maintain its reputation of having the minimum incidence of stubble burning.
Else, our punitive actions too are in place and these include penalties and withdrawing of facilities from farmers,” an officer of agriculture department said.



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