• KRIS 6 News spoke with Shayleigh Sprague about her daughters experience with Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV).
  • KRIS 6 News spoke with Dr. Jamie Fergie, an Infectious Disease Doctor at Driscoll Hospital.
  • According to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, RSV affects an estimated 64 million people and causes more than 160,000 deaths each year.
  • Health experts encouraging pregnant women to get the RSV vaccine to increase protection for their baby.

Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is a common respiratory virus that typically affects children. Now many parents in the Coastal Bend are having to take the extra step to keep their children safe due to a rise in cases.

Shayleigh Sprague is the mother to Averi. Their world turned upside down when their young daughter was diagnosed with RSV just days ago.

“Last Tuesday I kind of noticed that she was feeling off. She was not eating, not sleeping. She was just not her normal happy self,” Sprague said.

Her daughter, Averi, is currently quarantined as the family navigates the challenges of supporting their daughter through this illness.

Health experts are reporting a surge in RSV cases, keeping their doors revolving.

Dr. Jamie Fergie, an Infectious Disease doctor at Driscoll Childrens Hospital, said that his office has seen an increase in the amount of people coming in for RSV treatment.

“Since late August of this year, we began to see in an increase in the number of children here at Driscoll were coming in with RSV and it is very significant,” Fergie said. “We are seeing many children in our urgent care centers or emergency.”

Health officials are urging parents to be aware of RSV symptoms, which can initially resemble a common cold but may progress to more severe respiratory issues. These symptoms include cough, fever, and difficulty breathing.

Sprague said that her daughter was not acting like herself and appeared to be sick.

“So, I took her to the ER and her fever was 103 and it had spiked back up. 104 is the danger zone for babies where it can mess with their brain capabilities and fry their brain and stuff like that,” she said.

According to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, RSV affects an estimated 64 million people and causes more than 160,000 deaths each year.

But for this Sprague, she said that every parent should know their baby’s risk.

“Don’t share drinks with them. Don’t kiss them. RSV season is so bad right now, just don’t kiss babies that aren’t yours,” Sprague said.

Experts said that if you are an expecting mother, you should consider getting the RSV vaccine.

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