Call it an ode to joy.

New research has found “clear evidence” that listening to classical music in a group setting — such as a concert hall — causes a symphony of sorts throughout the body that impacts heart rate, breathing and even electrodermal activity, or the skin’s conductivity that can lead to goosebumps.

“Synchrony, especially heart-rate synchrony, was higher when listeners felt moved emotionally and inspired by a piece and were immersed in the music,” the research team from Switzerland’s University of Bern noted.

“When we talk about very abstract things such as aesthetic experiences, how you respond to art and to music, the body is always involved there,” lead researcher Wolfgang Tschacher, who observed 132 audience members at three classical performances, told Agence France-Presse.


"When we talk about very abstract things such as aesthetic experiences, how you respond to art and to music, the body is always involved there," said one researcher.
“When we talk about very abstract things such as aesthetic experiences, how you respond to art and to music, the body is always involved there,” said one researcher.
Getty Images/iStockphoto

Cameras used in the study, in spite of dark lighting and COVID seating separations, were even able to capture that those in attendance often moved in sync with one another, as their breathing rates also showed alignment.

Those who displayed “openness to new experiences” in addition to “agreeableness” experienced that the most.

Tschacher anticipates such a phenomenon would be “even stronger” across other musical genres.


Cameras captured that concert attendees often moved in sync with one another, as their breathing rates also showed alignment.
Cameras captured that concert attendees often moved in sync with one another, as their breathing rates also showed alignment.
China News Service via Getty Images

“There are additional reasons that people will synchronize in pop concerts, people move, they dance, and that’s that is synchronized by the music and that would give even clearer results,” he said.

The findings come on the heels of an audience member loudly moaningpossibly from an orgasm — as the Los Angeles Philharmonic played Tchaikovsky’s Fifth Symphony in Southern California last Spring.

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