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After a year of fighting COVID-19, when the restrictions were lifted and light began to appear at the end of the tunnel, doctors appeared in complex and devastating people with ongoing problems after the fight against the virus. I am concerned about the problem. Having been infected with COVID-19 and still having problems, it is known that doctors call it the inappropriate title of “long-distance carrier”. At the Tri-Health Good Samaritan Hospital in Cincinnati, we have set up a rehabilitation unit to help people suffering from fatigue. Symptoms such as shortness of breath, malaise, and cognitive impairment. Gaildo Novan said he was infected with COVID-19 in December, affecting not only his health but also his identity. COVID. Mr. Donovan feels like he’s still changing before COVID. ” Donovan said one of the most serious problems was trying to put together his thoughts. “I don’t even know what the conversation is about,” Donovan said, not just her. “It’s the secret story of this tragedy, 50-70% of people living with many disabilities,” says Tri. -Health Dr. David Wiltse. Wiltse is a pulmonary critical care center. According to the latest information, many people are still suffering even six months after COVID-19. According to Wilt, 75% have severe malaise, 50% have cognitive impairment, 50% have psychological problems, and nearly 50% have general muscle problems and dyspnea. 10% have serious lung damage. “I’ve been in this business for 40 years. I’ve never seen anything more scary or more embarrassing,” Wilze said.

When the restrictions were lifted a full year after the fight against COVID-19 and light began to appear at the end of the tunnel, doctors appeared to people with ongoing problems after the fight against the virus, a complex and devastating event. I’m worried about the problem.

People who are infected with COVID-19 and continue to have problems are known to be referred to by doctors as the inappropriate title of “long-distance carrier.”

At Tri-Health Good Samaritan Hospital in Cincinnati, we have set up a rehabilitation unit to help people suffering from prolonged conditions such as shortness of breath, malaise, and cognitive impairment.

Gail Donovan caught COVID-19 in December and said it affected not only her health but also her sense of identity.

“I don’t have a COVID, but I feel like I still have a COVID. Before the COVID, I feel like I’m still weird,” Donovan said.

Donovan said one of the most serious problems was trying to put together his thoughts.

“Once you don’t even know what the conversation is about, just like someone turns it off, your thoughts can disappear like a light,” says Donovan.

She is not alone.

“It’s the secret story of this tragedy, the story of 50-70% of people living with many disabilities,” said Dr. David Wiltse of Tri-Health.

Wiltse is a pulmonary critical care center. He said the latest information shows that many are still suffering, even six months after COVID-19.

According to Wilze, 75% are severe fatigue, 50% are cognitive impairment, 50% are psychological problems, nearly 50% are general muscle problems and dyspnea, and about 10% are severe lung damage. ..

“I’ve been in this business for 40 years. I’ve never seen anything more scary or more embarrassing,” Wilze said.

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