Even if the delta variant takes more COVID-19 patients to the hospital, treatment is becoming more effective by saving them. Dr. Stephen Bratt “In fact, some patients are about twice as likely to live with COVID infection when they are admitted to the hospital as they were when they first started treatment for COVID in early 2020. Research is out. ”One of the front-line treatments is monoclonal. These are laboratory-made antibodies that can be administered by infusion as an outpatient treatment. “It’s like getting an external vaccination with only antibodies to the virus-fighting protein,” Bratt Brat said, after a monoclonal infection, the normal progression of treatment is to gradually become antiviral drugs such as remdesivir. For those who need oxygen, the next step is steroids, which are even more powerful anti-inflammatory drugs when needed. y Explained well which medicines to use at different stages of the disease. If we don’t make progress, we don’t need the more serious medications that patients need when they get very ill, “Blat said. There are also new and promising COVID-19 treatments in the pipeline. We are conducting clinical trials and consulting services, research on a drug called Lenzilumab from Humanigen, headquartered in Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. Originally developed for the treatment of cancer, it has proven to be effective in the treatment of COVID. Lenzilumab data is currently being studied to consider whether to give urgent approval.

Even if the delta variant takes more COVID-19 patients to the hospital, treatment is becoming more effective by saving them.

“The percentage of people who survive COVID-19 is much better than when we first started treatment for COVID,” said Dr. Stephen Bratt of TriHealth. If you are hospitalized more than when you started treatment for COVID in early 2020, you can live with a COVID infection. “

Currently, one of the front-line treatments is monoclonal antibodies. These are laboratory-made antibodies that can be given as an outpatient treatment by intravenous drip.

“It’s like getting an external vaccination with just antibodies to a protein that fights the virus,” Bratt said.

According to Bratt, after monoclonal antibody therapy, the normal progression of treatment is gradually to antiviral drugs such as remdesivir. For those who need oxygen, the next step is steroids, which are even more powerful anti-inflammatory agents when needed.

“Which medicines to use at different stages of the disease is fairly well laid out. If it doesn’t progress, you don’t need the more serious medicines that patients need when they become very ill,” Bratt said. Mr. says.

There are also new and promising COVID-19 treatments in the pipeline.

A clinical trial and consulting service headquartered in Cincinnati and northern Kentucky is conducting research on a drug called Lenzilumab, a Humanigen drug.

“That is, what we are doing is adding treatment options for caregivers of critically ill patients,” said Tim Schroeder, CTI’s founder and CEO.

According to Schroeder, rangelumab was originally developed for the treatment of cancer, but has proven to be effective in treating COVID.

“It appears to be a reduction of about 50 percent of the primary endpoint, which was essentially keeping people away from the ventilator,” Schroeder said.

The FDA is currently reviewing data from the Lenzilumab study to determine whether to grant urgent approval.

More COVID Patients Survive With More Promising Treatments

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