City workers hand out take-home Covid-19 test kits in New York, Dec. 23, 2021.



Photo:

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

From a Jan. 4 Twitter thread by CNN’s

Chris Cillizza

:

I’ve noticed something amid this Omicron surge that’s made me reconsider the first 20 months of this pandemic. For months and months, no one I came into contact with admitted they had Covid. Not neighbors. Not co-workers. Not friends. Not acquaintances. No one. Except that, with Omicron surging and lots and lots of people now getting it, I’ve found some of these same people telling me they had it last fall or at the start of the pandemic or whenever. Which is fascinating to me. Because it suggests that they were embarrassed or scared to say they (or their family) had it before. Why? Probably not one reason for everyone, honestly. But I do think societally we unknowingly turned having Covid into some sort of judgment on your character. Like, getting Covid was a sign you weren’t being responsible or careful enough. . . . We need to recognize that getting Covid isn’t a moral failing! It’s a super infectious disease that you can protect against, sure, but can’t guarantee you won’t get it.

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Appeared in the January 10, 2022, print edition as 'Notable & Quotable: Stigma.'



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